Author Archives: Admin

Nikkei: KDDI plans 220 Mbps cellular network upgrade for summer 2014

Nikkei KDDI prepping smartphone with 220Mbps LTEAdvanced data

Think 150Mbps LTE-Advanced data is quick? KDDI could offer far more bandwidth next year. Nikkei claims that the Japanese carrier plans to upgrade its cellular network to 220 Mbps data as soon as summer 2014. Service would reportedly launch with an Android smartphone, and rely on new wireless technology; it’s not clear whether this entails a faster LTE-A variant or something new. KDDI hasn’t confirmed the rumor, so we wouldn’t consider moving to Japan just yet. If there’s any truth to the claims, however, even NTT DoCoMo’s upgraded LTE could soon feel downright pokey.

[Image credit: TAKA@P.P.R.S, Flickr]

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Source: Nikkei (subscription required)

Turn an Old Film Canister Into a Compact Flashlight

Turn an Old Film Canister Into a Compact Flashlight

If you have any old film canisters lying around in your attic, you can give them new life by turning them into flashlights.

The electronics in this build are nothing surprising, but it’s a very tidy implementation. You just wire up a battery to an LED bulb through a switch, mount the switch to the side of the canister, and poke the light out through the lid. This build is so cheap and simple that you could probably build a bunch and store them in various drawers around your house. They might not be the biggest or the brightest flashlights you could hope for, but they’re fun to make and a great use of what might otherwise go to waste.

Film Canister Flashlight | Instructables

The 16 cylinder BMW that almost was…. BMW 767i “Goldfish”

The 16 cylinder BMW that almost was.... BMW 767i "Goldfish"

It’s 1987, and Dr. Karlhienz Lange, Adolf Fischer and Hanns-Peter Weisbarth, the very germanic gentlemen who would also be responsible for the 8 series BMW, decide to make a production ready 16 cylinder version of the e32 7 series.

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Ars readers choke down Soylent reviews, mull cell tower data dumps

Five days worth of Soylent. God help me.
Lee Hutchinson

This week, Ars used Senior Reviews Editor Lee Hutchinson as a guinea pig for a new substance called Soylent, a mixture created by engineer and entrepreneur Rob Rhinehart. One bag of Rhinehart’s concoction, which is mixed with water, is supposed to be “nutritionally complete” for humans who don’t have time to eat normal food in a busy workday, or who are trapped in a post-apocalyptic hell and waiting for transport to our terraformed Earth colonies.

Lee announced his plan to forsake solid food and eat only Soylent on Monday, and as far as we can tell (we do all work from home, after all), he’s stuck to his week-long plan. Read the Monday article, Nothing but the Soylent: We’re trying 1 full week of the meal substitute, and catch the subsequent updates on Lee’s condition in the articles displayed in the sidebar on the right.

Commenter tigas had heard of Soylent, but didn’t believe in it: “You mean this wasn’t a viral promotion for a videogame? It’s FOR REAL?!” Before Lee had had the chance to become familiar—a little too familiar—with Soylent, he responded, “Well, there’s something in those bags. Will find out tomorrow morning if it’s Soylent….OR SPIDERS. Really hoping it’s not spiders.”

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Under Review: Volvo Edition

Under Review: Volvo Edition

After I was granted authorship privileges on Oppo, I decided to make an attempt at creating a regular feature article. Every week I will review a specific carmaker and discuss the reasons why it sucks and why it rocks. Volvo will be the subject of my inaugural article.

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Moto X could have price slashed to $100 by Christmas, $50 for wooden covers

Motorola's Moto X could cost $100 by end of the year, $50 for wooden covers

When Motorola announced it’s first flagship since becoming part of Google’s empire, it was to mixed response. But, if evleaks is right, as is often the case, then a forthcoming $100 price-drop could suddenly change all that. Currently, the customisable phone that listens to your every word will set you back $199 on your network of choice, so a drop to $99 on contract — just in time for Christmas — could see this rise up the ranks. Oh, and those wooden covers? Our leaker claims will come with a $50 price tag, for those that want the natural look.

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Source: @evleaks (Twitter)

HTC’s exiting designers interrogated for expense fraud and stealing trade secrets

HTC's top designers arrested, accused of stealing trade secrets for new company

Earlier today, several top designers at HTC were arrested in Taipei under suspicion of fraudulent expense claims, as well as stealing trade secrets ahead of leaving the company to run a new mobile design firm in both Taiwan and mainland China. Five people were interrogated, with the most notable ones being Vice President of Product Design Thomas Chien (pictured above), R&D director Wu Chien Hung and design team senior manager Justin Huang (who also personally sketched out the One’s design). Their offices were also raided yesterday.

Reports say HTC chairwoman Cher Wang personally filed a complaint to Taiwan’s Investigation Bureau, which has since learned that Chien, Wu and Huang planned to set up a new design company aimed at the mainland Chinese market, and that they would resign after claiming their mid-year bonuses yesterday. The real beef HTC has here is that it apparently caught Chien secretly downloading files related to the upcoming Sense 6.0 UI design, and then bizarrely enough, shared them with external contacts via e-mail.

The trio is also accused of making false commission fee claims for the One’s aluminum chassis design. While the design was done in-house, the three designers partnered with an external design firm, used it to invoice HTC for over US$334,000 worth of commission fee between May and July, and then split the money between themselves.

We reached out to HTC for a statement on this matter, but the spokesperson doesn’t have much to provide at this moment:

“The matter is under investigation by relevant authorities. We therefore refrain from further comments.”

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Source: UDN (Chinese)

Weekend Motorsports Roundup, August 31-September 1, 2013

Weekend Motorsports Roundup, August 31-September 1, 2013

Welcome to the Jalopnik Weekend Motorsports Roundup, where we let you know what’s going on in the world of racing, where you can see it, and where you can talk about it all in one convenient place. Where else would you want to spend your weekend?

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Facebook’s Windows Phone beta updated to work on WP7 too

There was a time when Windows Phone 7 users could only look on as WP8-using peers Like status updates on their newer and shinier Facebook app. Not anymore. An update to the Beta version is now ready for download, bringing to the table a user interface similar to the WP8 version that meshes well with the platform’s aesthetics. Those who’ve been waiting for the update forever can hit the source link below — it’s available for both platforms, so WP8-toting folks can also join the party.

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Source: Facebook (Windows Phone Market)

Washington Post report details how often security agencies break into other networks

The latest national security related revelation to come from the documents leaked by Edward Snowden is an account of how offensive computer operations work, and how many there are. The Washington Post reports that in 2011, 231 took place with about three quarters of them against “top-priority” targets, which its sources indicate include Iran, Russia, China and North Korea. Also interesting are details of software and hardware implants designed to infiltrate network hardware, persist through upgrades and access other connected devices or networks. The effort to break into networks is codenamed Genie, while the “Tailored Access Operations” group custom-builds tools to execute the attacks. One document references a new system “Turbine” that automates control of “potentially millions of implants” to gather data or execute an attack. All of this access isn’t possible for free however, with a total cyber operations budget of $1.02 billion which includes $25.1 million spent this year to purchase software vulnerabilities from malware vendors. Get your fill of codenames and cloak-and-dagger from the article posted tonight, or check out the “Black Budget” breakdown of overall intelligence spending.

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Source: Washington Post (1), (2)