Category Archives: Apple

Apple’s TV app gets live and on-demand shows with PS Vue integration

PlayStation Vue, Sony's sneakily growing video service, has earned the distinct honor of being the first streaming TV provider to be integrated into Apple's TV app. Subscribers will now be able to watch live and on-demand content through the TV app o…

“There’s more in the making”—Apple announces October 30 event

Apple

Apple will host another product announcement event on October 30 at 10am Eastern time, according to invitations that have gone out to members of the press and an update to Apple’s live events page.

The invitation for the event carries the copy, “There’s more in the making,” and it’s accompanied by artistic renditions of Apple’s logo. This combo suggests the products discussed at this event might be targeted at creative professionals and hobbyists—a common theme for Apple’s products of late. In fact, there appear to be several versions of the logo, and different members of the press received different ones. You can see many of them above or by refreshing the Apple live events page.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla come together to end TLS 1.0

A green exterior door is sealed with a padlock.

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl / Flickr)

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla have announced a unified plan to deprecate the use of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 early in 2020.

TLS (Transport Layer Security) is used to secure connections on the Web. TLS is essential to the Web, providing the ability to form connections that are confidential, authenticated, and tamper-proof. This has made it a big focus of security research, and over the years, a number of bugs that had significant security implications have been found in the protocol. Revisions have been published to address these flaws.

The original TLS 1.0, heavily based on Netscape’s SSL 3.0, was first published in January 1999. TLS 1.1 arrived in 2006, while TLS 1.2, in 2008, added new capabilities and fixed these security flaws. Irreparable security flaws in SSL 3.0 saw support for that protocol come to an end in 2014; the browser vendors now want to make a similar change for TLS 1.0 and 1.1.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The Apple Watch is being used to study joint replacement patients

As part of its latest healthcare-focused venture, Apple has teamed up with Zimmer Biomet on an app designed for knee and hip replacement patients. The app, called mymobility, works with the Apple Watch and iPhone, and it provides patients with guidan…

The full Photoshop CC is coming to the iPad in 2019

Adobe is bringing Photoshop CC to the iPad. Set for release next year, Photoshop CC for iPad will bring the full Photoshop engine to Apple’s line of tablets.

Photoshop for iPad has a user interface structured similarly to the desktop application. It is immediately familiar to users of the application but tuned for touch screens, with larger targets and adaptations for the tablet as well as gestures to streamline workflows. Both touch and pencil input are supported. The interface is somewhat simpler than the desktop version, and although the same Photoshop code is running under the hood to ensure there’s no loss of fidelity, not every feature will be available in the mobile version. The first release will contain the main tools while Adobe plans to add more in the future.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Apple is using backpacks to collect map data in San Francisco

Apple's quest to improve Maps' accuracy appears to include some on-foot action. Former Engadget writer Dante Cesa has posted photos of an Apple Maps worker carrying a backpack loaded with cameras, LiDAR sensors and other equipment as he walked throu…

Police told to avoid looking at recent iPhones to avoid lockouts

Police have yet to completely wrap their heads around modern iPhones like the X and XS, and that's clearer than ever thanks to a leak. Motherboard has obtained a presentation slide from forensics company Elcomsoft telling law enforcement to avoid lo…

Apple to Australia: “This is no time to weaken encryption”

Apple to Australia: “This is no time to weaken encryption”

Enlarge (credit: Michael Dodge/Getty Images)

Apple has filed its formal opposition to a new bill currently being proposed by the Australian government that critics say would weaken encryption.

If it passes, the “Assistance and Access Bill 2018″ would create a new type of warrant that would allow what governments often call “lawful access” to thwart encryption, something that the former Australian attorney general proposed last year.

The California company said in a filing provided to reporters on Friday that the proposal was flawed.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Apples fires back at Australian encryption bill

In a seven-page letter to the Australian government, Apple criticized the country's proposed Access and Assistance Bill 2018. Apple claims, among other complaints, that the legislation raises cybersecurity concerns and give the state power to abuse u…

Fitbit Charge 3 review: Peppering a fitness tracker with smartwatch powers

Fitbit Charge 3 review: Peppering a fitness tracker with smartwatch powers

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Fitbit contracted smartwatch fever last year. And since the debut of its Ionic smartwatch, the company’s signature fitness trackers haven’t made as many waves as they once did. That’s due in part to users embracing the smartwatch more as the technology improves over time.

But fitness trackers aren’t dead—or at least, Fitbit hopes they aren’t—and the company’s new Charge 3 tracker is designed for users who want some smartwatch features in a fitness tracker’s simple-band package.

Even today, fitness trackers have a few advantages over smartwatches: they’re easier to wear since they have slimmer, lighter profiles. They’re less complicated because they’re designed primarily to keep you fit (not necessarily for things like emailing on the go). And, perhaps the most important distinction of all, fitness trackers are generally less expensive than smartwatches.

Read 50 remaining paragraphs | Comments