Category Archives: Auto

Oh nothing, just 99 of Audi’s hottest ever cars all in one place.

Oh nothing, just 99 of Audi’s hottest ever cars all in one place. That’s cool, I guess. If you like that sort of thing.

Who doesn’t love a vintage bus? This “Mobile Cinema” is stunning.

Who doesn’t love a vintage bus? This "Mobile Cinema" is stunning. (Photo via Newspress)

This Is How Space Exploration Was Imagined Before Sputnik

Artists’ impressions always played key role in promoting the ideas of space travel, forming our view of future, preparing people for the upcoming of manned or unmanned cosmic missions, spreading the visions of astronomical scientists and aerospace engineers.

I found the following illustrations in several Hungarian scientific journals, most of them are from the early Fifties, depicting the future Soviet space activities like launching one or more stage rockets, travelling to the Moon, constructing space stations. It is very interesting for me to see how they imagined the space age years before the first successful satellite launch in 1957.

Collection and scan: Attila Nagy

2014 Porsche 911 Turbo: This Is It

The 911 Turbo celebrates its 40th birthday this year, so it’s only natural that Stuttgart made a new one. As you know already, the 991 Turbo won’t have a manual option, but comes with 560 horsepower in the S (520 in the Turbo), longer wheelbase, rear axle steering and all-wheel drive.

The 3.8-liter flat-six with variable geometry twin-turbocharging and direct injection packs 45 horsepower more in the Turbo than what you get from the naturally-aspirated 2014 911 GT3 for the European price of £118,349 ($184,186). The top of the range Turbo S has 85 more horses for £140,852 ($219,207) in Europe, so expect it to do "well under 7 min 30 sec" on the Nurburgring on standard street tires. We’ll update with U.S. pricing when we get it.

That has a lot to do with the fact that the steering angle of the rear wheels can be varied by up to 2.8 degrees, depending on vehicle speed. Porsche puts it this way:

Instead of conventional control arms, the system consists of two electro-mechanical actuators on the left and right of the rear axle. The steering angle of the rear wheels can be varied by up to 2.8 degrees, depending on vehicle speed. At speeds up to 31 mph (50 km/h), when the front wheels are turned the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction. This actually corresponds to a virtual shortening of the wheelbase by 250 mm, which gives the 911 Turbo unrivalled cornering agility. The system lets the car turn faster into the bend and offers more dynamic steering responses. Furthermore, this noticeably simplifies low speed manoeuvring and parking.

At speeds above 50 mph (80 km/h), the system steers the rear wheels parallel to the turned front wheels. This is equivalent to a virtual lengthening of the wheelbase by a significant 500 mm and gives the sports car tremendous stability, especially at high speeds.

The all-wheel drive system is also new, with an electronically controlled and activated multi-plate clutch and a water cooling function. This, and the standard seven-speed dual-clutch transmission, improves the Turbo’s acceleration to 3.2 seconds (with the optional Sport Chrono Package Plus), while the S is one tenth faster. Top speed is just under 200 mph. We will see what the 2015 McLaren P13 can say to those figures.

Apart from the full LED headlamps (optional on the Turbo), the two-tone 20-inch wheels (with central locking hubs on the S) and the usual widened body panels, the 991 Turbo features active aerodynamics thanks to the retractable three-stage front spoiler and a deployable rear wing which also has three settings depending on the conditions.

In case you were wondering, the new generation is "up to 16 percent" more fuel efficient than before.

Sounds nice, but can you forgive for the lack of manual?

Why TAG Heuer is The Gearhead Watch Brand

TAG Heuer is the quintessential gearheads’s watch. Not the Rolex Daytona, Hublot F1 King Power, or IWC Ingenieur (as IWC’s marketing department would now like you to think), but almost any TAG Heuer.

This piece won’t discuss car model-branded watches, as Michael Ballaban wrote about before, but rather watches for the proper car guy who likes to showcase his or her love of cars in general rather than something in particular.

A Brief History

Of course, TAG Heuer did not become TAG Heuer until 1985, when Mansour Ojjeh’s TAG Group bought the company because of the Quartz Watch Crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s, when the Swiss mechanical watch industry took a nosedive because of the cheap quartz watches from Japan. Mansour Ojjeh also happened at the time to own a large stake in McLaren Group, who also races cars in Formula One. The TAG Group also financed the engines (built by Porsche) for McLaren F1 cars from 1983 to 1987. This alone should make TAG Heuer the watch for gearheads. Eventually, TAG Heuer was sold to the LVMH Group, who make Louis Vuitton bags, Moët champagne, and Hennessey cognac, now with some watches thrown in, but don’t let that stop you from thinking of TAG Heuer as a watch for complete tools.

Why You Should Have One

When you wear a Formula 1, Carrera, but especially the Monaco, it is safe to think that you have a gearhead in front of you. (Though a Monaco owner may be trying to live out his Steve McQueen fantasies.) A Daytona owner will probably like cars too, but chances are he doesn’t know how to service them. (The exception is anyone who got their Daytona due to winning the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona.)

Also, as gearheads, we have an appreciation of all that is mechanical, meaning all TAG Heuers with the exception of the Formula 1 have a proper mechanical movement inside. Is it going to be more accurate than a quartz watch? No. Will it have a countdown timer and tell me the date down to the year? Probably not. But it is a watch that marks people as gearheads and who most of the time are willing to talk about cars.

But here’s the pervasive reason. Numerous racers loved Heuer watches. Enzo Ferrari gave a gold Carrera watch to all of his drivers. Mark Moss over at Calibre 11 has a great article on the numerous F1 drivers who wore Heuer watches from Jo Siffert (who actually sold Heuer watches to other drivers) to Ayrton Senna. Furthermore, even Allan McNish, one of my favorite sports car racers, wears a Carrera (though his compatriot Tom Kristensen is a Rolex Daytona ambassador). (Pictured is Clay Regazzoni with his Heuer Silverstone.)

Even today, TAG Heuer sponsors a lot of motorsports and pushes the envelope with regard to proper chronographs. At Monte Carlo, you can see the TAG Heuer logo all over the track even though Rolex is now the official watch of F1. At this year’s Baselworld, TAG Heuer showed off the MikroPendulumS concept (yes, concept products exist for watches too, especially when they cost as much as a car), whose stopwatch timing is intended to be even more accurate than the race timers, with two tourbillons (one for telling time and one for the stopwatch).

Maybe a reason why not…

One thing I will say is that TAG Heuer has branched out into sunglasses, mobile phones, and clothing accessories. Do not buy any of them. They are a travesty and a waste of money that could be going into a motoring hobby. Frankly, I wonder how much profit actually comes from those products. (Pictured are the Ayrton Senna-branded TAG Heuer sunglasses. As much as most of us like Senna, please don’t buy them.)

Overall, a TAG Heuer watch is generally the mark of a true gearhead, and it is something you’ll want to have for the rest of your life. It is something that pays for itself, as I found, and it is nowhere near as expensive as any Rolex or IWC. And you know it’s what the racers wear.

All photos courtesy TAG Heuer and Calibre11. Special thanks to Calibre11 for inspiring this article and doing the research.

Why TAG Heuer is The Gearhead Watch Brand

TAG Heuer is the quintessential gearheads’s watch. Not the Rolex Daytona, Hublot F1 King Power, or IWC Ingenieur (as IWC’s marketing department would now like you to think), but almost any TAG Heuer.

This piece won’t discuss car model-branded watches, as Michael Ballaban wrote about before, but rather watches for the proper car guy who likes to showcase his or her love of cars in general rather than something in particular.

A Brief History

Of course, TAG Heuer did not become TAG Heuer until 1985, when Mansour Ojjeh’s TAG Group bought the company because of the Quartz Watch Crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s, when the Swiss mechanical watch industry took a nosedive because of the cheap quartz watches from Japan. Mansour Ojjeh also happened at the time to own a large stake in McLaren Group, who also races cars in Formula One. The TAG Group also financed the engines (built by Porsche) for McLaren F1 cars from 1983 to 1987. This alone should make TAG Heuer the watch for gearheads. Eventually, TAG Heuer was sold to the LVMH Group, who make Louis Vuitton bags, Moët champagne, and Hennessey cognac, now with some watches thrown in, but don’t let that stop you from thinking of TAG Heuer as a watch for complete tools.

Why You Should Have One

When you wear a Formula 1, Carrera, but especially the Monaco, it is safe to think that you have a gearhead in front of you. (Though a Monaco owner may be trying to live out his Steve McQueen fantasies.) A Daytona owner will probably like cars too, but chances are he doesn’t know how to service them. (The exception is anyone who got their Daytona due to winning the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona.)

Also, as gearheads, we have an appreciation of all that is mechanical, meaning all TAG Heuers with the exception of the Formula 1 have a proper mechanical movement inside. Is it going to be more accurate than a quartz watch? No. Will it have a countdown timer and tell me the date down to the year? Probably not. But it is a watch that marks people as gearheads and who most of the time are willing to talk about cars.

But here’s the pervasive reason. Numerous racers loved Heuer watches. Enzo Ferrari gave a gold Carrera watch to all of his drivers. Mark Moss over at Calibre 11 has a great article on the numerous F1 drivers who wore Heuer watches from Jo Siffert (who actually sold Heuer watches to other drivers) to Ayrton Senna. Furthermore, even Allan McNish, one of my favorite sports car racers, wears a Carrera (though his compatriot Tom Kristensen is a Rolex Daytona ambassador). (Pictured is Clay Regazzoni with his Heuer Silverstone.)

Even today, TAG Heuer sponsors a lot of motorsports and pushes the envelope with regard to proper chronographs. At Monte Carlo, you can see the TAG Heuer logo all over the track even though Rolex is now the official watch of F1. At this year’s Baselworld, TAG Heuer showed off the MikroPendulumS concept (yes, concept products exist for watches too, especially when they cost as much as a car), whose stopwatch timing is intended to be even more accurate than the race timers, with two tourbillons (one for telling time and one for the stopwatch).

Maybe a reason why not…

One thing I will say is that TAG Heuer has branched out into sunglasses, mobile phones, and clothing accessories. Do not buy any of them. They are a travesty and a waste of money that could be going into a motoring hobby. Frankly, I wonder how much profit actually comes from those products. (Pictured are the Ayrton Senna-branded TAG Heuer sunglasses. As much as most of us like Senna, please don’t buy them.)

Overall, a TAG Heuer watch is generally the mark of a true gearhead, and it is something you’ll want to have for the rest of your life. It is something that pays for itself, as I found, and it is nowhere near as expensive as any Rolex or IWC. And you know it’s what the racers wear.

All photos courtesy TAG Heuer and Calibre11. Special thanks to Calibre11 for inspiring this article and doing the research.

Why TAG Heuer is The Gearhead Watch Brand

TAG Heuer is the quintessential gearheads’s watch. Not the Rolex Daytona, Hublot F1 King Power, or IWC Ingenieur (as IWC’s marketing department would now like you to think), but almost any TAG Heuer.

This piece won’t discuss car model-branded watches, as Michael Ballaban wrote about before, but rather watches for the proper car guy who likes to showcase his or her love of cars in general rather than something in particular.

A Brief History

Of course, TAG Heuer did not become TAG Heuer until 1985, when Mansour Ojjeh’s TAG Group bought the company because of the Quartz Watch Crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s, when the Swiss mechanical watch industry took a nosedive because of the cheap quartz watches from Japan. Mansour Ojjeh also happened at the time to own a large stake in McLaren Group, who also races cars in Formula One. The TAG Group also financed the engines (built by Porsche) for McLaren F1 cars from 1983 to 1987. This alone should make TAG Heuer the watch for gearheads. Eventually, TAG Heuer was sold to the LVMH Group, who make Louis Vuitton bags, Moët champagne, and Hennessey cognac, now with some watches thrown in, but don’t let that stop you from thinking of TAG Heuer as a watch for complete tools.

Why You Should Have One

When you wear a Formula 1, Carrera, but especially the Monaco, it is safe to think that you have a gearhead in front of you. (Though a Monaco owner may be trying to live out his Steve McQueen fantasies.) A Daytona owner will probably like cars too, but chances are he doesn’t know how to service them. (The exception is anyone who got their Daytona due to winning the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona.)

Also, as gearheads, we have an appreciation of all that is mechanical, meaning all TAG Heuers with the exception of the Formula 1 have a proper mechanical movement inside. Is it going to be more accurate than a quartz watch? No. Will it have a countdown timer and tell me the date down to the year? Probably not. But it is a watch that marks people as gearheads and who most of the time are willing to talk about cars.

But here’s the pervasive reason. Numerous racers loved Heuer watches. Enzo Ferrari gave a gold Carrera watch to all of his drivers. Mark Moss over at Calibre 11 has a great article on the numerous F1 drivers who wore Heuer watches from Jo Siffert (who actually sold Heuer watches to other drivers) to Ayrton Senna. Furthermore, even Allan McNish, one of my favorite sports car racers, wears a Carrera (though his compatriot Tom Kristensen is a Rolex Daytona ambassador). (Pictured is Clay Regazzoni with his Heuer Silverstone.)

Even today, TAG Heuer sponsors a lot of motorsports and pushes the envelope with regard to proper chronographs. At Monte Carlo, you can see the TAG Heuer logo all over the track even though Rolex is now the official watch of F1. At this year’s Baselworld, TAG Heuer showed off the MikroPendulumS concept (yes, concept products exist for watches too, especially when they cost as much as a car), whose stopwatch timing is intended to be even more accurate than the race timers, with two tourbillons (one for telling time and one for the stopwatch).

Maybe a reason why not…

One thing I will say is that TAG Heuer has branched out into sunglasses, mobile phones, and clothing accessories. Do not buy any of them. They are a travesty and a waste of money that could be going into a motoring hobby. Frankly, I wonder how much profit actually comes from those products. (Pictured are the Ayrton Senna-branded TAG Heuer sunglasses. As much as most of us like Senna, please don’t buy them.)

Overall, a TAG Heuer watch is generally the mark of a true gearhead, and it is something you’ll want to have for the rest of your life. It is something that pays for itself, as I found, and it is nowhere near as expensive as any Rolex or IWC. And you know it’s what the racers wear.

All photos courtesy TAG Heuer and Calibre11. Special thanks to Calibre11 for inspiring this article and doing the research.

Why TAG Heuer is The Gearhead Watch Brand

TAG Heuer is the quintessential gearheads’s watch. Not the Rolex Daytona, Hublot F1 King Power, or IWC Ingenieur (as IWC’s marketing department would now like you to think), but almost any TAG Heuer.

This piece won’t discuss car model-branded watches, as Michael Ballaban wrote about before, but rather watches for the proper car guy who likes to showcase his or her love of cars in general rather than something in particular.

A Brief History

Of course, TAG Heuer did not become TAG Heuer until 1985, when Mansour Ojjeh’s TAG Group bought the company because of the Quartz Watch Crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s, when the Swiss mechanical watch industry took a nosedive because of the cheap quartz watches from Japan. Mansour Ojjeh also happened at the time to own a large stake in McLaren Group, who also races cars in Formula One. The TAG Group also financed the engines (built by Porsche) for McLaren F1 cars from 1983 to 1987. This alone should make TAG Heuer the watch for gearheads. Eventually, TAG Heuer was sold to the LVMH Group, who make Louis Vuitton bags, Moët champagne, and Hennessey cognac, now with some watches thrown in, but don’t let that stop you from thinking of TAG Heuer as a watch for complete tools.

Why You Should Have One

When you wear a Formula 1, Carrera, but especially the Monaco, it is safe to think that you have a gearhead in front of you. (Though a Monaco owner may be trying to live out his Steve McQueen fantasies.) A Daytona owner will probably like cars too, but chances are he doesn’t know how to service them. (The exception is anyone who got their Daytona due to winning the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona.)

Also, as gearheads, we have an appreciation of all that is mechanical, meaning all TAG Heuers with the exception of the Formula 1 have a proper mechanical movement inside. Is it going to be more accurate than a quartz watch? No. Will it have a countdown timer and tell me the date down to the year? Probably not. But it is a watch that marks people as gearheads and who most of the time are willing to talk about cars.

But here’s the pervasive reason. Numerous racers loved Heuer watches. Enzo Ferrari gave a gold Carrera watch to all of his drivers. Mark Moss over at Calibre 11 has a great article on the numerous F1 drivers who wore Heuer watches from Jo Siffert (who actually sold Heuer watches to other drivers) to Ayrton Senna. Furthermore, even Allan McNish, one of my favorite sports car racers, wears a Carrera (though his compatriot Tom Kristensen is a Rolex Daytona ambassador). (Pictured is Clay Regazzoni with his Heuer Silverstone.)

Even today, TAG Heuer sponsors a lot of motorsports and pushes the envelope with regard to proper chronographs. At Monte Carlo, you can see the TAG Heuer logo all over the track even though Rolex is now the official watch of F1. At this year’s Baselworld, TAG Heuer showed off the MikroPendulumS concept (yes, concept products exist for watches too, especially when they cost as much as a car), whose stopwatch timing is intended to be even more accurate than the race timers, with two tourbillons (one for telling time and one for the stopwatch).

Maybe a reason why not…

One thing I will say is that TAG Heuer has branched out into sunglasses, mobile phones, and clothing accessories. Do not buy any of them. They are a travesty and a waste of money that could be going into a motoring hobby. Frankly, I wonder how much profit actually comes from those products. (Pictured are the Ayrton Senna-branded TAG Heuer sunglasses. As much as most of us like Senna, please don’t buy them.)

Overall, a TAG Heuer watch is generally the mark of a true gearhead, and it is something you’ll want to have for the rest of your life. It is something that pays for itself, as I found, and it is nowhere near as expensive as any Rolex or IWC. And you know it’s what the racers wear.

All photos courtesy TAG Heuer and Calibre11. Special thanks to Calibre11 for inspiring this article and doing the research.

Will Gran Turismo 6 Be Released On Nov. 28, 2013?

Great news for racing game fans: a possible release date for the sixth installment of the Gran Turismo franchise was leaked onto the web recently, and that puts the game as debuting on Nov. 28, 2013. The question is, where?

Here’s the situation. According to CNET, Italian game retailer Multiplayer.com briefly put up a listing for the game, including when it will come out and the potential box art you see above. That has since been taken down.

It all sounds very tentative. In addition, as MotorAuthority reports today, that may also only be the European release date.

If it’s true, it’s great news for gamers because it means we’ll get a new GT right before the holiday season and on the PlayStation 3, not the upcoming PS4. Details about the game itself are few and far between, but Sony may put more information out there at E3 in June.

Who’s excited for GT6?

Volvo Burnout Goes Great Until The Car Catches On Fire

Slow down, you’re burning out too fast/you’ve got to make the moment last/Just spinning tires on the cobblestones/looking for fun but catching on fire.

do it do doooo/feeling on fire