Category Archives: Intel

Ryzen gains on Intel with second generation

(credit: AMD)

The second-generation Ryzen chips announced last week are now out, and reviews have hit the ‘Net. Unlike the situation last week, we’re now free to talk about what has changed in the second-generation chips and where their improvements lie.

Model Cores/Threads Clock base/boost/GHz TDP/W Cooler Price
Ryzen 7 2700X 8/16 3.7/4.3 105 Wraith Prism (LED) $329
Ryzen 7 2700 8/16 3.2/4.1 65 Wraith Spire (LED) $299
Ryzen 5 2600X 6/12 3.6/4.2 95 Wraith Spire $229
Ryzen 5 2600 6/12 3.4/3.9 65 Wraith Stealth $199

AMD is calling the new parts “Zen+.” This isn’t a new architecture; rather, it’s a tweaked version of the first-generation Zen architecture. The basic layout of the chips remains the same: each contains two core complexes (CCXes), which are blocks of four cores, eight threads, and 8MB level 3 cache, joined with AMD’s Infinity Fabric.

Architecturally, the biggest improvements seem to have been made to memory and cache latencies. AMD says that the cache latency for level 1, level 2, and level 3 caches and main memory have all improved, reduced by up to 13 percent, 34 percent, 16 percent, and 11 percent, respectively. Tech Report’s benchmarks show improved main-memory latency, and PC Perspective found improved communications latency between CCXes.

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Intel cancels its smart glasses due to lack of investment

When Intel showed off its Vaunt smart glasses (aka "Superlight" internally) back in February, we had high hopes for a new wave of wearable tech that wouldn't turn us into Borgs. Alas, according to The Information's source, word has it that the chip m…

Intel reworks its malware scanner to speed up its processors

Since the full impact of Spectre and Meltdown became clear earlier this year, Intel has been making a big effort to reassure its customers that security is its top priority. To that end, the company has announced Intel Threat Detection Technology (TD…

Intel, Microsoft to use GPU to scan memory for malware

Intel Skylake die shot. (credit: Intel)

Since the news of the Metldown and Spectre attacks earlier this year, Intel has been working to reassure the computer industry that it takes security issues very seriously and that, in spite of the Meltdown issue, the Intel platform is a sound choice the security conscious.

To that end, the company is announcing some new initiatives that use features specific to the Intel hardware platform to boost security. First up is Intel Threat Detection Technology (TDT), which uses features in silicon to better find malware.

The company is announcing two specific TDT features. The first is “Advanced Memory Scanning.” In an effort to evade file-based anti-virus software, certain kinds of malware refrain from writing anything to disk. This has can have downsides for the malware—it can’t persistently infect a machine and, instead, has to reinfect the machine each time it is rebooted—but makes it harder to spot and analyze. To counter this, anti-malware software can scan system memory to look for anything untoward. This, however, comes at a performance cost, with Intel claiming it can cause processor loads of as much as 20 percent.

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Intel’s Hades Canyon NUC is a tiny gaming powerhouse

We called Intel's last NUC the future of tiny desktops. And with this latest model, the Hades Canyon NUC, that's truer than ever. It has just about everything you'd want in a desktop, thanks to a single chip that houses Intel's eighth-generation Core…

Google, other tech giants outline ways to improve IoT security

Google, Intel, Microsoft, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and a handful of other tech industry giants joined former FCC Chief Technologist Dale Hatfield to form the Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group in 2010, in an attempt to develop a s…

Report: Apple’s next iPhone will use Intel’s LTE modems

Enlarge / Modern iPhones in three sizes. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

Unlike Qualcomm, Samsung, MediaTek, and other SoC manufacturers, Apple doesn’t integrate an LTE modem into its iPhone SoCs along with the CPU and GPU, which means the company needs to order external modems. Those modems have historically been provided by Qualcomm, but according to a report from Bloomberg, Intel is officially being tapped as a second source of modems for the next iPhone.

The report indicates that iPhones sold on the Verizon network and in China will continue to use Qualcomm modems—it’s unclear what this means for carrier-unlocked iPhones in the US, which can be used on any major mobile network without issues—but even so, this is still a big deal for Intel. The company dominates the shrinking PC market, but so far it hasn’t been able to make much money from smartphones. In recent months, it has even dramatically scaled back its plans for smartphone SoC designs.

These rumors have been floating around since just after the iPhone 6S was released, and Qualcomm indicated in April that it could be losing modem orders from its “biggest customer” to a “second source.”

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Computex 2016: It’s a wrap!

Just like that, Computex 2016 has come to an end. As in previous years, the show kicked off with ASUS' big keynote presentation, but this time it wasn't just laptops, tablets and smartphones — the company also unveiled its first home robot, Zenbo. W…

Catch up with Computex 2016: Day two

After yesterday's ASUS keynote, Computex has finally kicked off under the hot Taipei sunshine. The show is no stranger to a variety of unusual PC parts, including enthusiast motherboards, gaming keyboards and bizarre cases, so it was rather fitting t…

Origin PC, Velocity Micro jump on Intel’s 10-core processor

Now that Intel has officially trotted out Core i7 Extreme Edition processors based on its shiny new Broadwell-E platform, gaming PC makers are coming out of the woodwork with systems that tout these extra-fast chips. You'll now find up to a 10-core p…