Category Archives: Memory

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

MRAM Developer Day, IBM Keynote Live Blog

Third Keynote in this session is from IBM Research: STT-MRAM is Ready for Applications Today. 

Intel at last announces Optane memory: DDR4 that never forgets

Enlarge / A stick of Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory. (credit: Intel)

Ever since Intel and Micron announced 3D XPoint memory in 2015, the world has been waiting for the companies to use it to build memory sticks.

3D XPoint blends the properties of flash storage and DRAM memory. Like flash, it’s persistent, retaining its value even when systems are powered down, and it’s dense, with about ten times the density of DRAM. Like DRAM, it supports low latency random access. Intel also claimed that its write endurance is substantially better than that of flash. This combination of features created the prospect of memory sticks that look like DIMMs and appear to the system as if they’re DDR4 RAM, but with much greater capacities, and with persistence: data written to “RAM” is retained permanently. Memory with these properties is exciting for a wide range of applications—for example, databases that no longer need to concern themselves with flushing data back to disk—and might one day provoke significant changes in the way operating systems and software are designed.

But while persistent memory was perhaps the most interesting application of 3D XPoint, the first products to hit the market were simply storage drives using “Optane” as their branding. There was a series of drives for enterprise customers, and some consumer-oriented M.2 sticks designed to be paired with a spinning disk to produce a high-speed hybrid. While 3D XPoint did offer some benefits over flash SSDs—in particular, the latency of the drives is significantly lower than that of comparable flash units, and the I/O performance is sustained even under heavy mixed read/write workloads—this wasn’t quite the revolution that we were hoping for.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments