Category Archives: Memory

Hide Your PIN or Password On a Fake Business Card With Magic Ink

Carrying a note to help you remember your PIN, password, or lock combination can be risky, especially if thieves get a hold of it. This DIY fake business card will only reveal your secret note when you give it a little heat.

In this video from the Shake the Future YouTube channel, you’ll learn how to hide any message on a fake business card (like an easy-to-forget PIN) with some thermochromatic pigment and some nail polish. Create and print out a fake business card on some thick paper using a word processor or free template online (a quick Google search will do the trick). Then create and print out an extra logo that matches the card (with your note printed inside). Mix your thermochromatic pigment with some gel effect nail polish, and paint it over the extra logo and note. Then cut out the newly painted logo and attach it to your business card with some glue.

If you press your thumb on the new logo, you’ll see the pigment fade and your hidden message will appear. Now whenever you forget your PIN, lock combination, password, or whatever you have trouble remembering, you know where to look. And if your wallet or purse gets stolen, thieves will never be able to find it.

http://lifehacker.com/5785420/the-on…

The Secret PIN Number | YouTube

Hide Your PIN or Password On a Fake Business Card With Magic Ink

Carrying a note to help you remember your PIN, password, or lock combination can be risky, especially if thieves get a hold of it. This DIY fake business card will only reveal your secret note when you give it a little heat.

In this video from the Shake the Future YouTube channel, you’ll learn how to hide any message on a fake business card (like an easy-to-forget PIN) with some thermochromatic pigment and some nail polish. Create and print out a fake business card on some thick paper using a word processor or free template online (a quick Google search will do the trick). Then create and print out an extra logo that matches the card (with your note printed inside). Mix your thermochromatic pigment with some gel effect nail polish, and paint it over the extra logo and note. Then cut out the newly painted logo and attach it to your business card with some glue.

If you press your thumb on the new logo, you’ll see the pigment fade and your hidden message will appear. Now whenever you forget your PIN, lock combination, password, or whatever you have trouble remembering, you know where to look. And if your wallet or purse gets stolen, thieves will never be able to find it.

http://lifehacker.com/5785420/the-on…

The Secret PIN Number | YouTube

Hide Your PIN or Password On a Fake Business Card With Magic Ink

Carrying a note to help you remember your PIN, password, or lock combination can be risky, especially if thieves get a hold of it. This DIY fake business card will only reveal your secret note when you give it a little heat.

In this video from the Shake the Future YouTube channel, you’ll learn how to hide any message on a fake business card (like an easy-to-forget PIN) with some thermochromatic pigment and some nail polish. Create and print out a fake business card on some thick paper using a word processor or free template online (a quick Google search will do the trick). Then create and print out an extra logo that matches the card (with your note printed inside). Mix your thermochromatic pigment with some gel effect nail polish, and paint it over the extra logo and note. Then cut out the newly painted logo and attach it to your business card with some glue.

If you press your thumb on the new logo, you’ll see the pigment fade and your hidden message will appear. Now whenever you forget your PIN, lock combination, password, or whatever you have trouble remembering, you know where to look. And if your wallet or purse gets stolen, thieves will never be able to find it.

http://lifehacker.com/5785420/the-on…

The Secret PIN Number | YouTube

Once thought safe, DDR4 memory shown to be vulnerable to “Rowhammer”

Researchers were able to reproduce bit-flipping attacks on Crucial Ballistix DDR4 DIMMs like those shown here.

Physical weaknesses in memory chips that make computers and servers susceptible to hack attacks dubbed “Rowhammer” are more exploitable than previously thought and extend to DDR4 modules, not just DDR3, according to a recently published research paper.

The paper, titled How Rowhammer Could Be Used to Exploit Weaknesses in Computer Hardware, arrived at that conclusion by testing the integrity of dual in-line memory modules, or DIMMs, using diagnostic techniques that hadn’t previously been applied to finding the vulnerability. The tests showed many of the DIMMs were vulnerable to a phenomenon known as “bitflipping,” in which 0s were converted to 1s and vice versa. The report was published by Third I/O, an Austin, Texas-based provider of high-speed bandwidth and super computing technologies. The findings were presented over the weekend at the Semicon China conference.

“Based on the analysis by Third I/O, we believe that this problem is significantly worse than what is being reported,” the paper warned. “And it is still visible on some DDR4 memory modules.”

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Scientists may have found molecular gatekeeper of long-term memory

(credit: NASA)

For a long-term memory to form in our noggins, a complex chain of cellular events needs to kick into action. It starts with chemical cues set off by a behavior or experience that make their way to specific nerve cells in the brain. Upon arrival to those cells, the chemical signals are ferried from the outer waiting area of the cell to the nucleus—a cell’s command center where the genetic blueprints are kept. In the nucleus, the molecular messenger can persuade the cell to switch on or off genes—which can strengthen nerve connections and, ultimately, lock down a memory for long-term recall.

While those general steps are clear, the details are still a bit fuzzy. For instance, researchers don’t know how exactly the molecular signals get shuttled to the command center, which generally have tight security. But a new study may finally have that answer.

In the tiny minds of fruit flies, a protein called importin-7 acts to shuttle the memory-triggering signal into the nucleus with its top-level clearance to the restricted area, researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Because this step of long-term memory formation seems the same in everything from flies to humans, and humans have their own version of importin-7, the finding could help fill in the details of how our minds form memories, the authors suggest.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

’5D’ discs can store data until well after the sun burns out

Researchers at the University of Southampton's Optical Research Center announced on Tuesday that they've perfected a technique that can record data in 5 dimensions and keep it safe for billions of years. The method etches data into a thermally stable…

Hibou Helps You Remember What You Read with Spaced Repetition

Hibou Helps You Remember What You Read with Spaced Repetition

Chrome: Ever read an article online, only to forget most of what it said a few days later? Hibou is an extension that will remind you to re-read it later for better retention.

Hibou uses spaced repetition to help you remember stuff you read. Just add an article to the Hibou extension, highlight the information you want to remember, and in a few days, it’ll remind you to brush up on that article. If you’re getting the hang of it, you can have it remind you less often, or if you still need a bit more repetition, you can tell it to remind you more often. It’s a great little extension for those of us that end up in Wikipedia holes for hours on end, and don’t remember any of it the next day.

You can read more about how Hibou works here, or check it out for yourself at the link below.

Hibou | via Reddit

Retain Information by Testing Yourself, Not Re-Reading

Retain Information by Testing Yourself, Not Re-Reading

If you want to learn something new—a foreign language, perhaps—you’ll probably study it by reading and re-reading the same words and phrases over and over until it sticks. But you’ll actually have more luck if you just start testing yourself.

In a study from Temple University, researchers examined two different methods for retaining information: studying and then testing yourself over the info (what they call repeated testing) or just studying and then studying some more (repeated study). Researchers found the latter was effective in the short term (as in five minutes), but over time, repeated testing was better for retaining the info. They reported:

Two experiments investigated recall following two study conditions, (1) repeated test: a study trial followed by multiple recall trials, and (2) repeated study: multiple study trials with no tests. At a retention interval of 5 minutes, repeated study produced a higher level of recall than repeated test. When the retention interval was extended, forgetting was much more rapid in the study condition, with the repeated test manipulation leading to higher recall at an interval of 7 days.

You’ve probably done this in your own studies. If you’re trying to learn a language, you’ll look at the word, then put your hand over it and try to say it on your own. That’s repeated testing, and, what the research suggests is that this is worth more of your study time than trying to memorize the word just by looking at it over and over.

Business Insider cites a similar study and goes into more detail about how efficient this strategy is. Check out their full post at the link below.

Different rates of forgetting following study versus test trials | National Center for Biotechnology Information via Business Insider

Photo by Komsomolec.

Remembered.io Offers Smart Reminders to Keep You Inspired, Make or Break Habits

Remembered.io Offers Smart Reminders to Keep You Inspired, Make or Break Habits

To-dos are easy to remember if you have an app with reminders. Principles, personal goals, things that motivate you, or reminders to help you build good habits (or break bad ones) are trickier, and not well handled by apps that just ping until you ignore them. That’s where Remembered.io comes in, with a more habit-based approach.

Remembered.io isn’t really designed to help you remember your to-dos or regular responsibilities (although you could use it for that.) Instead, the service wants to help you remember things that are personally important to you. You can use it to remind yourself of those dream projects that seem to slip through the cracks, motivational tidbits to make the day a little easier or give your work a little more meaning, or just facts and data you hate forgetting but constantly seem to.

For example, if you’re struggling to quit smoking, and a photo of your loved ones will encourage you to do so, Remembered.io can send it to you at specific times a day, up to three times a day, right when you need it most. Similarly, if you need a little encouragement to stay motivated during a depressing time, the service can send you just what you need to keep going (whether it’s a quotable, a memorable passage from a book or speech, or something else) to help you keep going. When you’re tired of it, or just don’t want to see a specific reminder again, you can tell it you “remember” it, and it won’t show it to you again. The service keeps track of whether you look at those reminders and how often you look, so you can see easily how well you’re doing.

http://lifehacker.com/5948871/master…

Part of this is based on the habit loop. Your remember me notifications serve as a “cue,” which encourages your routine (and thus, your reward.) I’ve been trying Remembered.io out for a while now, and it’s good at cycling reminders and giving you visual feedback to when you’re actually paying attention and when you’re not, which is great. Speaking of paying, the service isn’t free—it’s $2.50/month, which the team behind it says they’re charging because: One, they think the service is worth your money, and two, that’s how they plan to stay afloat—you’re the customer, not the product. There is a free trial, however, and you can check it out at the link below.

Remembered.io

Protect Your Short Term Memory by Avoiding the “Fluency” Trap

Protect Your Short Term Memory by Avoiding the "Fluency" Trap

If you’ve ever forgotten something immediately after learning it, you’ve probably experienced “fluency.” With this simple trick, you can counteract your brief memory loss and avoid any negative consequences.

Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel, psychologists at Washington University and coauthors of Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, explain that something called “fluency” can mess with your mind when you’re trying to remember the things you’re seeing. Essentially, it’s that feeling you get when you’re reading something and you quickly glance over it because you automatically assume it will be easy to remember. Drake Baer at Business Insider gives an example:

Say, for instance, you’re at the airport and you’re trying to remember which gate your flight to Chicago is waiting for you at. You look at the terminal monitors — it’s B44. You think to yourself, Oh, B44, that’s easy. Then you walk away, idly check your phone, and instantly forget where you’re going.

To avoid the fluency trap in that situation, you should read the gate number, turn away from the monitor, and ask yourself “what’s the gate number?” Now you’ll either recall the number or realize you looked at it and never actually committed it to memory. The same thing can happen with learning people’s names. They can go in one ear and out the other if you’re not careful. You can’t always prevent fluency from happening, but you can avoid it’s negative effects if you’re aware of it.

http://lifehacker.com/why-its-so-har…

4 strategies for remembering everything you learn | Business Insider

Photo by Keenan Pepper.