Category Archives: Monitors

Philips launches a 43-inch HDR monitor that reaches 1,000 nits of brightness

Philips

EPI this week announced a new 4K monitor under the Philips brand called the Philips Momentum 436M6, which will arrive in mid-to-late June for $999.99. At 43 inches, it’s big, but most notably it’s the first PC monitor to gain DisplayHDR 1000 certification from the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA), the organization that sets standards for displays and other electronics.

VESA introduced the DisplayHDR spec last December to create a consistent and open standard for high dynamic range (HDR) performance on LCD displays, most prominently PC monitors. There are three tiers to the benchmark: DisplayHDR 400 for low-end HDR panels, DisplayHDR 600 for those in the mid-range, and DisplayHDR 1000 for higher-end screens. We’ve seen a handful of monitors sporting the first two classifications in recent months, but this is the first to officially claim the top-level spec.

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Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

A substantial PC upgrade, or even a better workspace, doesn’t have to be a huge project that drains your time and energy. If you can order the parts, there are several worthwhile improvements you can make that’ll pay off big when it’s time to work (or play). Here are some of them.

10. Switch to a New, Better Case

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

This one’s for the PC builders out there. Even if you keep all of the same components, there’s nothing like a brand new case to give your computer—and your desk—a new lease on life. Maybe you’d like some more easily accessible USB ports, or maybe you bought a huge case back in the day and now you’d rather have a space-saving model.

http://lifehacker.com/5994570/five-b…

As long as you buy smart and don’t let a new case spiral into building a new PC, you can have your cake and eat it too. If you need some suggestions, we have our favorite PC cases here, and our favorite small form-factor PC cases here to get you started. You can (and should) also check out what the folks at Logical Increments suggests based on your budget, and what’s popular over on PCPartPicker.

http://lifehacker.com/5951431/five-b…

9. Upgrade Your Display

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

A new display, bigger display, or additional display can make all the difference in your productivity (or not, but it’ll definitely make your desk cooler.) Whether you’re rocking an old 22" display you’ve had forever, don’t even have an external display, or could use the screen real estate that a 4K display could offer, now’s a good time to upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/ultrawide-vs-d…

Even if you don’t want to go full 4K, there are plenty of affordable, large panels that could give you more room to work. You could always go with an ultrawide display instead of multiple panels, or you can pick up a large, solid budget LED display to give your desk a facelift and a utility boost.

http://lifehacker.com/five-best-budg…

8. Get a New Keyboard and Mouse

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

You use your keyboard and mouse every day, and there’s no easier way to give yourself that “new computer” feeling than to upgrade them both. Sure, your PC’s innards will be the same as they’ve always been, but new peripherals, especially ones you’ve had your eyes on, can make a huge difference.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-…

If you’ve been using the keyboard and mouse that came with your computer, now’s a good time to upgrade to a new one. Maybe give a mechanical keyboard a try (we love them around here), or pick up a sleek new gaming keyboard (and mouse). They’re fun for play, sure, but they can also help you get real work done. If you need some mouse suggestions, we’ve always been big fans of Logitech’s Performance MX, but the new MX Master is a fitting successor to it. It’s not your only option, though!

http://lifehacker.com/logitech-mouse…

7. Upgrade your Graphics Card

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

Again, this is for the desktop PC owners (and builders) here, but a graphics card upgrade can be a big improvement for a PC that’s starting to show its age (or slow down when you try to unwind and play some video games!) Of course, it’s not always a smart investment, so you should make sure you think hard before rushing out to buy whatever card everyone’s shouting about these days. Still, if yours is due for an upgrade and you’ll actually benefit from the upgrade, it’s easy to find even budget-friendly cards that will make the most of that new display we mentioned earlier, and speed up your system’s performance in your favorite games.

http://lifehacker.com/5883376/what-h…

6. Give Yourself the Gift of Better Audio

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

Whether you like to listen to music, or you record audio for podcasts, streams, or just do the occasional Skype call or Hangout with coworkers, a new pair of speakers or headphones (and we have some suggestions in the headphone department,) and a microphone can go a long long way toward making sure your audio is crystal clear. Best of all, they don’t cost a fortune, and installation is easy enough to do in a couple of minutes.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-make-su…

We’re big fans of the Blue Yeti, but if that’s not your style, here are some of our other picks. If you’re still not sure, check out our guide to choosing the best microphone for you, or check out some of our favorite headsets with attached microphones if that’s more your speed.

When it comes to speakers, you have plenty of options, from simple bookshelf speakers you can connect to anything, great desktop speaker systems designed for PCs, to full 5.1 surround systems. Choose what works for you and your space, but anything will be an upgrade over the speakers that came with your PC, or whatever’s built into your laptop.

5. Add a New, HD Camera

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

If you’re thinking about doing video streams, or just want your visuals to match the crystal clear audio you got from that last upgrade, a new camera is in order. Odds are whatever camera is built into your laptop may not be the best, and certainly isn’t adjustable. A new, HD-capable camera will make sure everyone can see you clearly and you’re not a fuzzy blob on-screen when you fire up a Skype call, or try to do a Google Hangout with friends or coworkers when you work from home. Worst case, if you don’t have a camera at all, you probably have a good one on your phone. We have guides to turn your iOS device or Android phone into a PC-connected webcam.

http://lifehacker.com/5961369/five-b…

4. Add More Convenient Power (Strips)

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

When you set up your desk the first time, odds are you didn’t include all the power you’d need to connect everything you have now. Maybe you added some power strips later, or worse, you’re daisy-chaining power strips together for some reason. Stop that and get yourself a good surge protector, or better yet, a good UPS to protect your gear. Then tack on a long, server-style power strip to connect to it and give you all the power you need for all your gear. It’s a better solution than big, bulky power strips hanging off the walls, and your cables will be easier to manage.

http://lifehacker.com/long-server-ro…

3. Upgrade Your Power Supply

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

Now we’re getting serious. Upgrading your power supply may take a little time (no more than transplanting all of your gear to a new case, however!) but if you’re rocking the one that came with your case when you built your PC, one that’s way too underpowered for the gear you’ve crammed into your build, or you’re experiencing strange and quirky problems with your system, it might be time for an upgrade. Don’t expect to save money on energy though, that’s not what this is about—it’s about stability and giving you enough juice to run everything you want to run. Get thee to a power supply calculator and make sure the one you buy can support your system.

http://lifehacker.com/5970985/why-hi…

2. Add more RAM

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

We’ve said before that most modern systems probably won’t benefit from more than around 4GB of RAM, but that doesn’t mean that yours won’t be an outlier. If you don’t have that much, or you do memory intensive tasks, high-end gaming, or use virtualization software to test software or experiment, you’ll need more—a lot more. For everyday use though, 16GB is the new ceiling. Plus, while RAM isn’t as cheap as it used to be, it’s still cheap enough that in some cases it makes more sense to just max out your motherboard and call it a day.

http://lifehacker.com/performance-te…

However, just make sure you’re not spending more on RAM than you would on other, better and more valuable upgrades to your system. More RAM isn’t a silver bullet to better performance, but if your system is hurting for memory, you probably know it already, so full speed ahead.

1. Install an (or Upgrade Your) SSD

Top 10 PC and Workspace Upgrades You Can Do in an Afternoon

If you have a computer built at all in the past few years, your boot drive is probably already an SSD. That’s great! You may want another one—bigger SSDs are cheaper now than they’ve ever been, and even if you already have one, if it’s super old and slow, there’s nothing wrong with upgrading to a newer, faster one. Even if you have a laptop, your drive is probably easy to swap out and replace, and the benefits will show themselves the first time you reboot your machine.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-soli…

If you need some help picking a good one, here are some suggestions, and of course, you can always find some good picks at Logical Increments and make sure they’re compatible with your gear at PCPartPicker. When it comes time to actually do the installation, make sure you take your files and settings with you, and optimize it for performance.

http://lifehacker.com/5837543/how-to…


Lifehacker’s Weekend Roundup gathers our best guides, explainers, and other posts on a certain subject so you can tackle big projects with ease. For more, check out our Weekend Roundup and Top 10 tags.

Illustration by Fruzsina Kuhári. Photos by TJStamp, Brett Morrison, Kevin Pham, Matthew Keefe, yoppy, Murat Tanyel, danrock, Yutaka Tsutano, and Intel Free Press.

Build a Low-Light Streaming Video Baby Monitor With a Raspberry Pi

If you’re looking for a DIY way to keep an eye on your baby, Element 14′s put together a guide that shows off how to build your own night vision camera with motion detection using a Raspberry Pi.

The project here uses the Raspberry Pi 3 alongside the NoIR camera adapter. From there, the Raspberry Pi runs a live video stream that can send you a notification any time it detects motion. It might seem a little stressful to use a DIY system for something as important as a baby monitor, but the live stream makes it so you can check in as often as you like to make sure it’s always working. Still, you might want to use it in addition to a more traditional audio monitor. Either way, head over to Element14 for the full guide to make it for yourself.

NoIR V2 Video Streaming Baby Monitor | Element14

Dell’s Affordable 4K IPS Monitor Is Down to $361 on Amazon

Dell's Affordable 4K IPS Monitor Is Down to $361 on Amazon
Dell P2415Q IPS 4K Monitor, $361

Dell’s P2415Q 4K monitor has always been the most affordable 4K IPS display on the market, but today, it’s all the way down to $361 on Amazon, the best price we’ve ever seen.

To be clear, there have been arguably better deals on this monitor from Dell, but those all involved Dell promo gift cards; this is the best cash price we’ve ever seen.

If you aren’t familiar, IPS displays boast superior color accuracy and viewing angles compared to the TN panels you’ll find in most cheap 4K monitors, and with this deal, you’re basically getting IPS for “free” compared to the going rate for similar 4K displays. I happen to own this exact monitor, and I absolutely love it.

http://www.amazon.com/Dell-Monitor-P…

Here’s a macro shot I took of my own screen. Look how tiny those pixels are!

Dell's Affordable 4K IPS Monitor Is Down to $361 on Amazon

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I Bought An Expensive-Ass PC Gaming Monitor And It’s Really Good

I Bought An Expensive-Ass PC Gaming Monitor And It’s Really Good

Look, sometimes you spend $709 on a gaming monitor and wind up really happy with your purchase. I’m not saying it happens every time, but it happened this time.

After months of hemming, hawing, and talking myself out of it, last week I went ahead and dropped a bunch of bucks on a newfangled G-Sync monitor. This was a luxury purchase, and in many ways a ridiculous one: The monitor I bought cost twice as much as my PC’s graphics card, which itself cost as much as a PS4 or Xbox One. Whatever, though. Thirty minutes after I plugged the thing in, it was already clear: This shit was worth it.

As a single upgrade, this monitor has had a bigger and more immediate impact than upgrading to a 4GB graphics card; more than moving my Windows installation and games to a solid-state hard drive; certainly more than upgrading to Windows 10 or overclocking my GPU and CPU.

G-Sync is a proprietary monitor technology that the graphics-card manufacturer Nvidia introduced a couple of years ago. The idea sounded good: A chip that’s built into a monitor allows the monitor to talk directly with your PC’s graphics card and change its refresh rate on the fly, smoothly matching whatever is being output by the card.

If you’ve seen all the talk about frame-rate and 60fps over the last couple of years, that’s all tied to refresh rate, too. The higher (and more stable) the frame-rate on a game, the smoother it looks. The closer the game’s frame-rate is to the screen’s refresh rate, the less chance of tearing or hitching.

I Bought An Expensive-Ass PC Gaming Monitor And It’s Really Good

Historically, PC gamers have been stuck with two options for syncing frames with their monitor refresh-rates: They can use vertical sync (Vsync), which artificially locks a game’s frame-rate to a target number, or they can simply run the game with an unlocked frame-rate. Both options have downsides, and both options can leave you feeling like you’re not getting the most out of your expensive graphics card. Everything I’d heard about G-Sync suggested that this technology is a for-real, actual, bona-fide way to sync your PC and your screen, and that it makes games run noticeably more smoothly.

Last week I decided, fuck it, I’m going for it. Here’s the monitor I bought. It’s a 27-inch, 2560×1440 Acer with a 144Hz refresh rate and built-in G-Sync support. There are plenty of other G-Sync monitors out there; this one had some good reviews, so I decided to go with it. I got mine from Amazon for a little below list price, but lots of stores carry them.

Thoughts informing my decision:

  1. It seems like a safe bet to get a 1440p monitor, given that it’s become a more reasonable resolution for stable PC gaming. 4K resolution just doesn’t seem practical or even necessary for a monitor-sized screen.
  2. 144Hz is more than double the 60Hz refresh rate of the other screens in my apartment, but I’ve seen enough PC gamers swear by higher frame-rates that I wanted to see what the deal was.
  3. Between the resolution and refresh rate, this monitor seems like it’ll be future-resistant, at least for a few years. For better or for worse, I’ve already committed to Nvidia’s whole deal by buying my latest graphics card from them, so I don’t really see myself switching to AMD anytime soon.
  4. It’s getting dark at like 4PM in Portland this time of year, and buying myself something cool will make me temporarily forget about that and feel happy.

Downsides:

  1. It only has a single DisplayPort input, so I won’t be able to have it double as an aux monitor for my game consoles without buying an expensive adapter and manually swapping inputs. Apparently this is always true for this kind of G-Sync monitor, and it’s a bummer.
  2. It costs $709, which is an insane amount of money to spend on a gaming peripheral, and enough to buy a whole lot of donuts and pastrami sandwiches.
  3. I don’t really care for some of the ways Nvidia does business. (More on that in a bit.)

The pros outweighed the cons, so I ordered the thing. A few days later, it arrived. I plugged it in, and yow. It is a damn good monitor.

I Bought An Expensive-Ass PC Gaming Monitor And It’s Really Good

It’s tricky to write about this kind of technology, because I can’t just show it to you. You’ll have to take my word for it. So: G-Sync works as advertised, and it’s noticeably changed how I experience PC games. I no longer sweat frame-rate fluctuations at all—I just turn on a game, turn off Vsync, and let it run. I have a GTX 970 graphics card, which can run most games at at least 1080p and get them north of 60fps. Since my monitor now goes all the way up to 144Hz, it has plenty of headroom to let games exist in the 60-80fps range, and thanks to G-Sync, it runs all of those frame-rates smoothly, with no tearing.

(Some purists may need their games to run at 144fps—I’m not there yet. I can usually detect when a game drops below 60fps, but in the midst of gameplay, I can’t really tell the difference between, say, 78fps and 94fps. When I run a game at a locked 144fps I can detect that it’s unusually smooth, but anything north of 60 is fine by me.)

I wasn’t aware of just how thoroughly screen-sync issues had invaded my PC gaming consciousness until I no longer had to deal with them. Time was, I’d start playing a new PC game with one eye on the FPS counter in the corner of the screen. If I saw a hitch or a slow point, both eyes would dart to the edge of the screen, like I was trying to catch the performance dip in the act. “Oh, nicked down to 54fps that time,” I’d think. “That’s not good.” Eventually I would have to turn off the FPS counter just so I would stop fixating on it and enjoy the game.

Now, every game just runs. GTA V is capable of maintaining 70-90fps on near-ultra settings in 1440p, and you should see it. It looks perfect. Even in the rare event that the frame-rate dips below 60fps, I barely notice, because there’s no hitching or stutter. Other games look just as good: Shadow of Mordor, Mad Max, The Witcher 3, Black Ops III, and on, and on. Dying Light looks bananas. Fallout 4 and Just Cause 3 have some real problems running at a consistent frame-rate, but even those games’ dips aren’t a big deal with G-Sync running.

The monitor can be a little funky sometimes: Assassin’s Creed Syndicate, for instance, drops its FPS to zero every time I leave a menu, though it returns to 60+ a few moments after that. Divinity: Original Sin will sometimes start freezing and unfreezing periodically, though that problem is addressed by restarting the game and I actually can’t say whether it’s G-Sync related or not. Regardless, a few hiccups don’t do much to mar the overall experience for me. It’s PC gaming, after all. There’ll always be some funkiness.

There are a few other things I don’t like about the monitor, however, chiefly the fact that it’s required me to make a substantial financial commitment to Nvidia’s hardware ecosystem. Ugh. Just typing the phrase “hardware ecosystem” makes me feel compromised. It’s one thing to take the initial step of buying an Nvidia or AMD graphics card. That’s a first step, and you can always change your mind next time around and go the other way. Buying a second piece of hardware is a much more substantial investment; it effectively removes any chance that I’ll switch to AMD for the duration of this monitor’s lifespan.

I Bought An Expensive-Ass PC Gaming Monitor And It’s Really Good

The technology is so good that I wish all monitors had it and that it could work with any graphics card. So, it’s too bad that G-Sync is proprietary to Nvidia and requires such a financial commitment to get it. AMD has a competing technology called FreeSync, which sounds like it works similarly, in that it requires a monitor to be equipped with the technology before your AMD card can work with it. There are some technical differences in how the two operate, but a primary difference is that Nvidia has controlled who can and can’t have a G-Sync module for use in their monitors, while AMD has made FreeSync freely available to any company that might want to support it.

AMD’s more open approach is doubtless fueled in part by the fact that they’re the less popular brand and need to cut into Nvidia’s lead, but the dichotomy between the two still reinforces my distaste for the way Nvidia operates. Nvidia is all about injecting their proprietary tech anywhere they can, meaning that most big-budget games ship with GameWorks features that can (and often do) hobble performance on non-Nvidia GPUs. I get how competitive the PC gaming market is, and I don’t entirely begrudge Nvidia their attempts to succeed and make money, but as we’ve seen over the last couple of years, that kind of cutthroat maneuvering hurts games as often as it helps them and causes headaches for gamers who don’t get in line.

It feels like it’ll only be a matter of time before all gaming-oriented monitors and TVs can do something similar to G-Sync. I may dislike that I’m forced to pick a brand and stick with it for the foreseeable future, but for the time being, I’m ultimately fine throwing in with Nvidia. I trust that they’re not going anywhere and that their cards will generally do a good job of running the games I want to play. It’ll do for now.

I understand that this article might get some of you considering spending too much money on a piece of hardware that you really don’t need. I sympathize! Most PC gamers have that one piece of equipment that they don’t own, but that they’d like to own. Your PC can always be a little bit better, after all; it’s both the blessing and the curse of PC gaming. You could always have that slightly faster CPU or that slightly improved graphics card; that clackier keyboard, or that mouse with all the buttons.

All of us have that one thing—the next thing—that we’re considering getting. Sometimes that next thing is more trouble than it’s worth; sometimes, that next thing is a disappointment. But sometimes, you spend a bunch of money on a thing and it winds up being totally worth it. Hooray, a new piece of technology does exactly what it promised it would.

To contact the author of this post, write to kirk@kotaku.com.

If You’re Upgrading to 4K, You Won’t Do Better Than This $380 IPS Display

If You're Upgrading to 4K, You Won't Do Better Than This $380 IPS Display

Dell’s P2415Q 4K monitor has always been the most affordable 24” 4K IPS display on the market, but today, it’s all the way down to $380 with promo code 22Z$5FP?ZHLWPT.

If you aren’t familiar, IPS displays boast superior color accuracy and viewing angles compared to the TN panels you’ll find in most cheap 4K monitors, and with this deal, you’re basically getting IPS for “free” compared to the going rate for similar 4K displays. I happen to own this exact monitor, and I absolutely love it. [Dell P2415Q 24” 4K IPS Display, $380 with promo code 22Z$5FP?ZHLWPT]

More Deals

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Most Popular 4K Computer Monitor: Dell 27-Inch Ultra HD 4K Monitor

Most Popular 4K Computer Monitor: Dell 27-Inch Ultra HD 4K Monitor

Great 4K monitors used to be hard to find, and very expensive. That’s not the case anymore, with plenty of solid 60Hz panels at all prices and sizes. Earlier in the week we asked you for your favorites, then looked at the five best 4K computer monitors. Now we’re back to highlight your top pick.

Most Popular 4K Computer Monitor: Dell 27-Inch Ultra HD 4K Monitor

Voting was pretty tight across all five displays, and there were definitely champions and detractors for each. At the end of the day, the price, features, and screen size of the Dell 27-Inch Ultra HD 4K Monitor (P2715Q) won most of your hearts (and many of your dollars) with over 31% of the votes cast. You praised it for being a 60Hz IPS display with a solid screen size to desk footprint ratio, and for bringing Dell’s known-quality to the table.

Second place and 24% of the vote went to the slightly larger Samsung 28-Inch Ultra High Definition LED Monitor (U28D590D), a popular favorite among Kinja Deals shoppers and budget-friendly buyers who love the fact that it’s often on sale at incredible prices. It’s not perfect, but tons of you came out to express your love of—and purchase of—this panel. In third place, the Seiki Pro SM40UNP 40-Inch 4K Monitor brought in over 18% of the votes cast, thanks to its legacy as the successor of one of the first affordable 4K displays, and its massive screen size that makes all those packed pixels easier to work with. Fourth place went to the Monoprice CrystalPro 28-Inch LED 4K 60Hz Monitor, which earned 14% of the overall vote, and your praises for being a budget friendly option. Bringing up the rear was the smaller sibling of our winner, the Dell 24-Inch Ultra HD 4K Monitor (P2415Q), which offers the same features and a lower price, but of course a smaller panel in the process. It earned 12% of the votes cast.

For more on each of these and the honorable mentions not listed here, head back to our full Hive Five feature to read more.

The Hive Five is based on reader nominations. As with most Hive Five posts, if your favorite was left out, it didn’t get the nominations required in the call for contenders post to make the top five. We understand it’s a bit of a popularity contest. Have a suggestion for the Hive Five? Send us an email attips+hivefive@lifehacker.com!

Here’s the Best Deal We’ve Ever Seen on a 27″ 4K IPS Display

Here's the Best Deal We've Ever Seen on a 27" 4K IPS Display

Dell’s 27” 4K IPS display is the early voting leader in Lifehacker’s 4K monitor Hive Five, and you can get one today direct from dell for $540, along with a $150 promo e-gift card. That’s a great deal for any 4K monitor, let alone one with an IPS panel.

I actually own the 24” model of this monitor, and absolutely love it. If you have any questions about it, let me know in the comments. [Dell 2715Q 4K Display, $540 + $150 Dell E-Gift Card]

Note: You’ll need to redeem the gift credit within 90 days.


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker

Here’s the Best Deal We’ve Ever Seen on a 27″ 4K IPS Display

Here's the Best Deal We've Ever Seen on a 27" 4K IPS Display

Dell’s 27” 4K IPS display is the early voting leader in Lifehacker’s 4K monitor Hive Five, and you can get one today direct from dell for $540, along with a $150 promo e-gift card. That’s a great deal for any 4K monitor, let alone one with an IPS panel.

I actually own the 24” model of this monitor, and absolutely love it. If you have any questions about it, let me know in the comments. [Dell 2715Q 4K Display, $540 + $150 Dell E-Gift Card]

Note: You’ll need to redeem the gift credit within 90 days.


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker

Here’s the Best Deal We’ve Ever Seen on a 27″ 4K IPS Display

Here's the Best Deal We've Ever Seen on a 27" 4K IPS Display

Dell’s 27” 4K IPS display is the early voting leader in Lifehacker’s 4K monitor Hive Five, and you can get one today direct from dell for $540, along with a $150 promo e-gift card. That’s a great deal for any 4K monitor, let alone one with an IPS panel.

I actually own the 24” model of this monitor, and absolutely love it. If you have any questions about it, let me know in the comments. [Dell 2715Q 4K Display, $540 + $150 Dell E-Gift Card]

Note: You’ll need to redeem the gift credit within 90 days.


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker