Category Archives: Soc

Samsung reveals high-end, low-power chips for midrange phones

Samsung has announced that it's bringing its 14nm Exynos chips to cheaper smartphones. These are smaller chips that are both more efficient and more powerful, and given that the company is already putting the technology to use on competitors' chips (…

LG disputes claim that the Snapdragon 810 is too hot

Yesterday a Bloomberg report stated that the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S6 would be skipping Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 810 due to the chip overheating. The report said that the heat issues would force Samsung to go with its own Exynos chip worldwide, a big departure from the way previous Samsung products have worked. We already knew the Snapdragon 810 will be in Xiaomi’s Mi Note Pro and LG’s Flex 2, and after Samsung’s reported Qualcomm diss, LG has stepped up to defend the semiconductor company’s honor.

Speaking to Reuters, Woo Ram-chan, LG’s Vice President for Mobile Product Planning said, “I am very much aware of the various concerns in the market about the [Snapdragon] 810, but the chip’s performance is quite satisfactory… I don’t understand why there is a [sic] issue over heat.”

Of course, Samsung can be a lot pickier than LG when it comes to SoCs. LG has only dabbled in SoC production, but Samsung has far more advanced capabilities and uses its own SoCs in many territories. LG is essentially stuck with whatever Qualcomm puts out, unless it wants to switch to unpopular options from Nvidia and Intel.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The AnandTech Mobile Show – MWC 2014 Edition

Earlier this morning (Barcelona time) Brian and I sat down in front of a camera and recapped some of the major news at MWC. We talked about the new Snapdragon 610/615, IMG's Series 6XT architecture disclosure, Intel's Merrifield and Moorefield as well as our hands on experience with Samsung's Galaxy S 5.

Check it all out in the video below!

The AnandTech Mobile Show – MWC 2014 Edition

Earlier this morning (Barcelona time) Brian and I sat down in front of a camera and recapped some of the major news at MWC. We talked about the new Snapdragon 610/615, IMG's Series 6XT architecture disclosure, Intel's Merrifield and Moorefield as well as our hands on experience with Samsung's Galaxy S 5.

Check it all out in the video below!

The AnandTech Mobile Show – MWC 2014 Edition

Earlier this morning (Barcelona time) Brian and I sat down in front of a camera and recapped some of the major news at MWC. We talked about the new Snapdragon 610/615, IMG's Series 6XT architecture disclosure, Intel's Merrifield and Moorefield as well as our hands on experience with Samsung's Galaxy S 5.

Check it all out in the video below!

The AnandTech Mobile Show – MWC 2014 Edition

Earlier this morning (Barcelona time) Brian and I sat down in front of a camera and recapped some of the major news at MWC. We talked about the new Snapdragon 610/615, IMG's Series 6XT architecture disclosure, Intel's Merrifield and Moorefield as well as our hands on experience with Samsung's Galaxy S 5.

Check it all out in the video below!

NVIDIA Tegra K1 Preview & Architecture Analysis

NVIDIA has taken to using CES as its platform for launching members of its Tegra mobile SoC family. This year was no different as it shifted branding a bit in its announcement of the Tegra K1, formerly known as Project Logan.

With Tegra 2 NVIDIA’s big selling point was being first to dual-core in Android. Tegra 3 attempted to do the same with being first to quad-core. Tegra 4 just made things faster. Tegra K1 on the other hand does away with the gimmicks and instead focuses on fundamentals.

The SoC will come in two versions, one version with a quad-core (4+1) Cortex-A15, and one that leverages two of NVIDIA’s own 64-bit ARMv8 Denver CPUs. More importantly, they both ship with a full implementation of NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU architecture. In fact, Tegra K1 marks a substantial change in the way NVIDIA approaches mobile GPU design. From this point forward, all mobile GPUs will leverage the same architectures as NVIDIA’s desktop parts. As if that wasn’t enough, starting now, all future NVIDIA GeForce designs will begin first and foremost as mobile designs. NVIDIA just went from playing with mobile to dead serious in a heartbeat.


    







NVIDIA Tegra K1 Preview & Architecture Analysis

NVIDIA has taken to using CES as its platform for launching members of its Tegra mobile SoC family. This year was no different as it shifted branding a bit in its announcement of the Tegra K1, formerly known as Project Logan.

With Tegra 2 NVIDIA’s big selling point was being first to dual-core in Android. Tegra 3 attempted to do the same with being first to quad-core. Tegra 4 just made things faster. Tegra K1 on the other hand does away with the gimmicks and instead focuses on fundamentals.

The SoC will come in two versions, one version with a quad-core (4+1) Cortex-A15, and one that leverages two of NVIDIA’s own 64-bit ARMv8 Denver CPUs. More importantly, they both ship with a full implementation of NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU architecture. In fact, Tegra K1 marks a substantial change in the way NVIDIA approaches mobile GPU design. From this point forward, all mobile GPUs will leverage the same architectures as NVIDIA’s desktop parts. As if that wasn’t enough, starting now, all future NVIDIA GeForce designs will begin first and foremost as mobile designs. NVIDIA just went from playing with mobile to dead serious in a heartbeat.


    







NVIDIA Tegra K1 Preview & Architecture Analysis

NVIDIA has taken to using CES as its platform for launching members of its Tegra mobile SoC family. This year was no different as it shifted branding a bit in its announcement of the Tegra K1, formerly known as Project Logan.

With Tegra 2 NVIDIA’s big selling point was being first to dual-core in Android. Tegra 3 attempted to do the same with being first to quad-core. Tegra 4 just made things faster. Tegra K1 on the other hand does away with the gimmicks and instead focuses on fundamentals.

The SoC will come in two versions, one version with a quad-core (4+1) Cortex-A15, and one that leverages two of NVIDIA’s own 64-bit ARMv8 Denver CPUs. More importantly, they both ship with a full implementation of NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU architecture. In fact, Tegra K1 marks a substantial change in the way NVIDIA approaches mobile GPU design. From this point forward, all mobile GPUs will leverage the same architectures as NVIDIA’s desktop parts. As if that wasn’t enough, starting now, all future NVIDIA GeForce designs will begin first and foremost as mobile designs. NVIDIA just went from playing with mobile to dead serious in a heartbeat.


    







NVIDIA Tegra K1 Preview & Architecture Analysis

NVIDIA has taken to using CES as its platform for launching members of its Tegra mobile SoC family. This year was no different as it shifted branding a bit in its announcement of the Tegra K1, formerly known as Project Logan.

With Tegra 2 NVIDIA’s big selling point was being first to dual-core in Android. Tegra 3 attempted to do the same with being first to quad-core. Tegra 4 just made things faster. Tegra K1 on the other hand does away with the gimmicks and instead focuses on fundamentals.

The SoC will come in two versions, one version with a quad-core (4+1) Cortex-A15, and one that leverages two of NVIDIA’s own 64-bit ARMv8 Denver CPUs. More importantly, they both ship with a full implementation of NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU architecture. In fact, Tegra K1 marks a substantial change in the way NVIDIA approaches mobile GPU design. From this point forward, all mobile GPUs will leverage the same architectures as NVIDIA’s desktop parts. As if that wasn’t enough, starting now, all future NVIDIA GeForce designs will begin first and foremost as mobile designs. NVIDIA just went from playing with mobile to dead serious in a heartbeat.