Category Archives: Tech

Google Chromecast Review – An Awesome $35 HDMI Dongle

So I have a confession to make – I didn’t hate the Nexus Q. While I didn’t necessarily love it and use it daily like a small minority of my peers did, I also didn’t immediately declare the product an unmitigated disaster like the vast majority of people. The fate of that product was so quickly decided that I hadn’t even begun writing my review when the whole thing was terminated. When I spoke with Googlers about Nexus Q, what was obvious to me was that the Q had begun as an audio-only product that later on had HDMI added, and that tiny bit of context made all the difference in understanding the choices behind it. I left the Nexus Q plugged into my AV Receiver up until the most recent set of Google Play apps killed functionality entirely.

Today we're taking a look at Google's new attempt to make a TV accessory for streaming videos and music from Chrome, smartphones, and tablets, the $35 Chromecast. Read on for our full review. 

Google Chromecast Review – An Awesome $35 HDMI Dongle

So I have a confession to make – I didn’t hate the Nexus Q. While I didn’t necessarily love it and use it daily like a small minority of my peers did, I also didn’t immediately declare the product an unmitigated disaster like the vast majority of people. The fate of that product was so quickly decided that I hadn’t even begun writing my review when the whole thing was terminated. When I spoke with Googlers about Nexus Q, what was obvious to me was that the Q had begun as an audio-only product that later on had HDMI added, and that tiny bit of context made all the difference in understanding the choices behind it. I left the Nexus Q plugged into my AV Receiver up until the most recent set of Google Play apps killed functionality entirely.

Today we're taking a look at Google's new attempt to make a TV accessory for streaming videos and music from Chrome, smartphones, and tablets, the $35 Chromecast. Read on for our full review. 

Google Chromecast Review – An Awesome $35 HDMI Dongle

So I have a confession to make – I didn’t hate the Nexus Q. While I didn’t necessarily love it and use it daily like a small minority of my peers did, I also didn’t immediately declare the product an unmitigated disaster like the vast majority of people. The fate of that product was so quickly decided that I hadn’t even begun writing my review when the whole thing was terminated. When I spoke with Googlers about Nexus Q, what was obvious to me was that the Q had begun as an audio-only product that later on had HDMI added, and that tiny bit of context made all the difference in understanding the choices behind it. I left the Nexus Q plugged into my AV Receiver up until the most recent set of Google Play apps killed functionality entirely.

Today we're taking a look at Google's new attempt to make a TV accessory for streaming videos and music from Chrome, smartphones, and tablets, the $35 Chromecast. Read on for our full review. 

Google Chromecast Review – An Awesome $35 HDMI Dongle

So I have a confession to make – I didn’t hate the Nexus Q. While I didn’t necessarily love it and use it daily like a small minority of my peers did, I also didn’t immediately declare the product an unmitigated disaster like the vast majority of people. The fate of that product was so quickly decided that I hadn’t even begun writing my review when the whole thing was terminated. When I spoke with Googlers about Nexus Q, what was obvious to me was that the Q had begun as an audio-only product that later on had HDMI added, and that tiny bit of context made all the difference in understanding the choices behind it. I left the Nexus Q plugged into my AV Receiver up until the most recent set of Google Play apps killed functionality entirely.

Today we're taking a look at Google's new attempt to make a TV accessory for streaming videos and music from Chrome, smartphones, and tablets, the $35 Chromecast. Read on for our full review. 

Google Chromecast Review – An Awesome $35 HDMI Dongle

So I have a confession to make – I didn’t hate the Nexus Q. While I didn’t necessarily love it and use it daily like a small minority of my peers did, I also didn’t immediately declare the product an unmitigated disaster like the vast majority of people. The fate of that product was so quickly decided that I hadn’t even begun writing my review when the whole thing was terminated. When I spoke with Googlers about Nexus Q, what was obvious to me was that the Q had begun as an audio-only product that later on had HDMI added, and that tiny bit of context made all the difference in understanding the choices behind it. I left the Nexus Q plugged into my AV Receiver up until the most recent set of Google Play apps killed functionality entirely.

Today we're taking a look at Google's new attempt to make a TV accessory for streaming videos and music from Chrome, smartphones, and tablets, the $35 Chromecast. Read on for our full review. 

Google debuts new Zagat app for Android and iOS, redesigned website

Google debuts new Zagat app for Android and iOS, redesigned website

Sure, Mountain View slowly infused Maps with Zagat content after acquiring the brand, but now it’s revamped the outfit’s mobile apps on Android and iOS, along with its website, to boot. As you’d expect, users can wield the apps and website to find venues with searches and map-based browsing, and catch up on news and videos from the service’s editors. In this fresh incarnation, Google’s lifted a registration requirement that was previously necessary to peruse reviews online. Schmidt and Co.’s redesigned experience only covers restaurants and nightlife in nine cities, but will include hotels, shopping and other points of interest in a total of 50 US cities over the coming months. In the meantime, Zagat promises its existing ratings and reviews for spots in those markets will soon be available on the web. Hit the bordering source links below to grab the reimagined applications.

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Source: Google, Google Play, iTunes

Professor spoofs $80M superyacht’s GPS receiver on the high seas

A team from the University of Texas spoofed the GPS receiver on a live superyacht in the Ionian Sea.

One of the world’s foremost academic experts in GPS spoofing—University of Texas assistant professor Todd Humphreys—released a short video on Monday showing how he and his students spoofed the GPS equipment aboard an expensive superyacht.

Humphreys conducted the test in the Ionian Sea in late June 2013 and early July 2013 with the full consent of the “White Rose of Drachs” yacht captain. His work shows just how vulnerable and relatively easy it is to send out a false GPS signal and trick the on-board receiver into believing it.

“What we did was out in the open, it was against a live vehicle, a vessel—an $80 million superyacht, controlling it with a $2,000 box,” he told Ars. “This is unprecedented. This has never been shown in this kind of demonstration. That’s what so sinister about the attack that we did. There were no alarms on the bridge. The GPS receiver showed a strong signal the whole time. You just need to have approximate line of sight visibility. Let’s say you had an unmanned drone, you could do it from 20 to 30 kilometers away or on the ocean you could do two to three kilometers.”

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Join the Engadget HD Podcast live on Ustream at 8:30PM ET

Join the Engadget HD Podcast live on Ustream at 530PM ET

It’s Monday, and you know what that means; another Engadget HD Chromecast Podcast. We hope you will join us live when we talk all things Chromecast at 8:30PM. If you’ll be joining us, be sure to go ahead and get ready by reviewing the Chromecast news after the break, then you’ll be ready to participate in the live chat.

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Time Warner gobbles up more cash from customers by raising modem fees

Time Warner Cable informed customers today that it is raising the price of leasing a modem from $3.95 to $5.99 per month.

Time Warner only started charging customers for use of the company’s modems last November after introducing the $3.95 monthly fee. With the fee now being $5.99, that’s $71.88 extra per year compared to the days when Time Warner did not charge for modem usage—for the same “equipment that customers already had in their homes” as Consumerist notes. The modem fee charges are in addition to the various price increases Time Warner customers have been seeing for Internet service.

The message sent to customers today regarding the modem fee increase was reprinted by several news sites. According to Reuters, the fee is charged to “[s]ubscribers on Time Warner’s Cable’s most popular Internet plan,” and the fee hike does not affect “customers who buy higher-end packages.” We’ve contacted Time Warner to ask exactly which customers are affected but haven’t heard back yet.

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Mercedes-Benz imagines seamless door-to-door directions with Google Glass

Despite apps that let a few lucky Glass owners control their Nest thermostat or unlock that Tesla Model S, one of the futuristic headgear’s most practical applications is still just the default turn-by-turn directions that come courtesy of Google. The R&D department over at Mercedes-Benz realizes that as well, but wants to take it a step further. According to a report in the Silicon Valley Business Journal, the automotive company is working on a Google Glass project that combines both pedestrian and automotive directions to take a user literally from door to door. MBRDNA President and CEO Johann Jungwirth told the publication that he wants Glass to seamlessly transition between walking and in-car navigation. Of course, not everyone has access to the pricey wearable just yet, so the project won’t likely see real-world application any time soon. In the meantime, Mercedes does have a few more down-to-earth solutions for the gadgets you might already have.

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Source: Silicon Valley Business Journal