Category Archives: Windows

The Fusion Desktop

The Fusion Desktop

Flickr user Alexandru Tropenpflanze‘s desktop is a great example of what you can do with Rainmeter in Windows, and it’s not difficult to set up. Shortcuts, a few well-placed widgets, and some useful information is all it takes. Here’s what you’ll need to make one of your monitors look this way.

This isn’t Alexandru’s only desktop—he has a few more with varying wallpapers, but the general look and feel is the same. We like this one because it captures a lot of information on one screen, perfect for a quick-look HUD when you sit down to work, or a second monitor that’s not always in active use. Here’s what you’ll need to set it up:

  • The Fusion wallpaper from DeviantArt
  • The Rainmeter system tweaking and monitoring tool for Windows
  • The Enigma suite for Rainmeter for the system/network/volume graphs, mini taskbar, and the feed reader
  • The Circuitous skin for Rainmeter for the Recycle Bin in the lower left
  • The Soul skin for Rainmeter for the text-based application launcher
  • The Elegance 2 skin for Rainmeter for the clock, time, and date
  • The Elementary skin for the weather forecast
  • The Do I Need a Jacket skin for the simplified, plain-text weather forecast
  • The Arcs skin for Rainmeter for the clock/status/disk usage display in the center
  • Stardock Fences to organize and hide desktop icons

It’s a lot in one package, but the nice thing here is that while the whole thing looks great, you can take or leave individual components and skins to craft what you really want. It’s just a really solid list of skins and tools that offer a lot of customization options and tweaks that can personalize your desktop. If you like what you see, or you’re having trouble getting the components to work just right, head over to Alexandru’s Flickr page (linked below) to ping him with questions. Let him know we sent you and that you like his work when you do!

Do you have a good-looking, functional desktop of your own to show off? Share it with us! Post it to your personal Kinja blog using the tag desktop showcase or add it to our Lifehacker Desktop Show and Tell Flickr pool. Screenshots must be at least at least 640×360 and please include information about what you used, links to your wallpaper, skins, and themes, and any other relevant details. If your awesome desktop catches our eye, you might get featured!

Desktop 4 | Flickr

The Fusion Desktop

The Fusion Desktop

Flickr user Alexandru Tropenpflanze‘s desktop is a great example of what you can do with Rainmeter in Windows, and it’s not difficult to set up. Shortcuts, a few well-placed widgets, and some useful information is all it takes. Here’s what you’ll need to make one of your monitors look this way.

This isn’t Alexandru’s only desktop—he has a few more with varying wallpapers, but the general look and feel is the same. We like this one because it captures a lot of information on one screen, perfect for a quick-look HUD when you sit down to work, or a second monitor that’s not always in active use. Here’s what you’ll need to set it up:

  • The Fusion wallpaper from DeviantArt
  • The Rainmeter system tweaking and monitoring tool for Windows
  • The Enigma suite for Rainmeter for the system/network/volume graphs, mini taskbar, and the feed reader
  • The Circuitous skin for Rainmeter for the Recycle Bin in the lower left
  • The Soul skin for Rainmeter for the text-based application launcher
  • The Elegance 2 skin for Rainmeter for the clock, time, and date
  • The Elementary skin for the weather forecast
  • The Do I Need a Jacket skin for the simplified, plain-text weather forecast
  • The Arcs skin for Rainmeter for the clock/status/disk usage display in the center
  • Stardock Fences to organize and hide desktop icons

It’s a lot in one package, but the nice thing here is that while the whole thing looks great, you can take or leave individual components and skins to craft what you really want. It’s just a really solid list of skins and tools that offer a lot of customization options and tweaks that can personalize your desktop. If you like what you see, or you’re having trouble getting the components to work just right, head over to Alexandru’s Flickr page (linked below) to ping him with questions. Let him know we sent you and that you like his work when you do!

Do you have a good-looking, functional desktop of your own to show off? Share it with us! Post it to your personal Kinja blog using the tag desktop showcase or add it to our Lifehacker Desktop Show and Tell Flickr pool. Screenshots must be at least at least 640×360 and please include information about what you used, links to your wallpaper, skins, and themes, and any other relevant details. If your awesome desktop catches our eye, you might get featured!

Desktop 4 | Flickr

Oh Sweet, You Can Use the Xbox One Controller on PC Now

Oh Sweet, You Can Use the Xbox One Controller on PC Now

For all its flaws, I’m a pretty big fan of the Xbox One . But while the voice control can occasionally miss the mark and sometimes the Kinect won’t recognize you, there’s one thing that’s flawless: that controller. And now Microsoft has released the drivers for download so you can use it on PC. I’ve been dreaming of this day for months.

When I went off to college and said goodbye to my (family’s) old-school desktop PC, the old, wired Xbox 360 controller became a huge part of my life. Almost like an old friend. I know the wear and tear on my trusty controller almost too well. I mean, who wants to whip out a Bluetooth mouse to play computer games which you can just plug in a controller, lean back, and go? OK, super competitive shooter players, but I am not one of those.

And now, with controller support being more common than ever, the dream lives on. The only problem is that once I laid hands on the Xbox One controller, with its wonderfully little textured control sticks, I could never go back, which made playing controller-games on the PC a bit of a drag. But now that I can use the Xbox One controller? Oh man it’s like so many games just got a breath of fresh air. I can’t wait to sit down and play some Dustforce tonight. You can grab the drivers here to get in on some fun of your own.

Oh Sweet, You Can Use the Xbox One Controller on PC Now

Chrome Releases Faster, More Stable 64-Bit Builds for Windows

Chrome Releases Faster, More Stable 64-Bit Builds for Windows

Windows: If you have a 64-bit capable machine, you can now download a 64-bit version of Chrome that includes better performance, security, and stability.

Right now, the 64-bit builds are available in the Dev and Canary channels of Chrome, but with Chrome’s rapid-release cycle, should hit Beta and Stable soon. Google claims the 64-bit builds come with a number of improvements:

    • Speed: 64-bit allows us to take advantage of the latest processor and compiler optimizations, a more modern instruction set, and a calling convention that allows more function parameters to be passed quickly by registers. As a result, speed is improved, especially in graphics and multimedia content, where we see an average 25% improvement in performance.
    • Security: With Chrome able to take advantage of the latest OS features such as High Entropy ASLR on Windows 8, security is improved on 64-bit platforms as well. Those extra bits also help us better defend against exploitation techniques such as JIT spraying, and improve the effectiveness of our existing security defense features like heap partitioning.
    • Stability: Finally, we’ve observed a marked increase in stability for 64-bit Chrome over 32-bit Chrome. In particular, crash rates for the the renderer process (i.e. web content process) are almost half that of 32-bit Chrome.

    If you’ve been waiting for 64-bit builds, now’s your chance to try it out! Download the Canary or Dev channel to get started, or hit the link below to read more.

    Try Out the New 64-Bit Windows Canary and Dev Channels | Chromium Blog

    Mailviewer Opens Old Outlook, Thunderbird, and Windows Live Emails

    Mailviewer Opens Old Outlook, Thunderbird, and Windows Live Emails

    Windows: If you’ve got some old emails you’d like to retrieve from Windows Live, Outlook Express, or Thunderbird, Mailviewer can do so—no installation required.

    Mailviewer can view an email database from Outlook Express, Windows Vista Mail, Windows Live Mail, and Thunderbird. Just open it up, browse to your mail database, and you’ll be able to see your messages as well as search or extract individual ones.

    The best part? It’s completely portable, so you don’t need to install anything. Hit the link to check it out.

    Mailviewer

    New “Windows 8.1 with Bing” SKU announced

    Microsoft has announced a new Windows 8.1 version for OEMs to preinstall. “Windows 8.1 with Bing,” as it is known, appears to be identical in every way to regular Windows 8.1, with one exception: OEMs have to leave the system defaulting to using the Bing search engine.

    Windows 8.1 already defaults to using Bing, but OEMs can change that default if they choose. In the Bing edition, they cannot.

    The new version is only available to OEMs for preinstallation, and it may also be combined with Office or a one-year Office 365 subscription.

    Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Averting Disaster – A Guide To Computer Backups (2014)

    We all store more and more of our lives in digital form; spreadsheets, résumés, wedding speeches, novels, tax information, schedules, and of course digital photographs and video. All of this data is easy to store, transmit, copy, and share, but how easy is it to get back?

    Averting Disaster – A Guide To Computer Backups (2014)

    We all store more and more of our lives in digital form; spreadsheets, résumés, wedding speeches, novels, tax information, schedules, and of course digital photographs and video. All of this data is easy to store, transmit, copy, and share, but how easy is it to get back?

    Averting Disaster – A Guide To Computer Backups (2014)

    We all store more and more of our lives in digital form; spreadsheets, résumés, wedding speeches, novels, tax information, schedules, and of course digital photographs and video. All of this data is easy to store, transmit, copy, and share, but how easy is it to get back?

    Averting Disaster – A Guide To Computer Backups (2014)

    We all store more and more of our lives in digital form; spreadsheets, résumés, wedding speeches, novels, tax information, schedules, and of course digital photographs and video. All of this data is easy to store, transmit, copy, and share, but how easy is it to get back?