Monthly Archives: July 2014

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Feedback Loop: DOS gaming and tech-themed vacations

In this week’s Feedback Loop, we fondly remember the golden age of Sega, recommend technology themed places to visit on a vacation, share tips for getting a good deal when switching carriers and talk about the first DOS games we ever played. Head…

These Automatically-Reversing Seats On Japanese Trains Are The Best

These Automatically-Reversing Seats On Japanese Trains Are The Best

Everyone! Hey everyone! It’s official. As in, I, me, have just declared these automatically-reversing seats on a Japanese train to be the new Best Thing Ever. Why hasn’t America, home of achievements like the iPad and the Apollo program and the KFC Double Down , not thought of this???

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US claims Chinese exec used hackers to steal warplane data

The US isn’t done throwing the book at alleged Chinese industrial spies. The Department of Justice has charged a Chinese executive living in Canada, Su Bin, with stealing sensitive info for Boeing and Lockheed Martin warplanes like the C-17 cargo…

Person Buys Tesla, Person Immediately Crashes Tesla

Person Buys Tesla, Person Immediately Crashes Tesla

Today’s the big day. You’re just bought a Tesla Model S. You’ve waited so long. Saved up all that money. You’re going to be the hit of the board room. "So forward thinking, so progressive," they’ll say about you. No one will notice your gray hairs now. Just ease it out of the lot. There we go.

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How would you change the Lumia 720?

Just like the Star Trek movies, we’ve mostly preferred the even-numbered ranges of Nokia Lumia handsets to the odds. We heaped praise on the 620, for example, with equal vitriol being poured onto the 520 that nestled beneath it. The Lumia 720…

Google’s Play Store is getting a big, visually intensive makeover

Many would argue that the Google Play Store for Android is useful in its current form, but pretty? Not so much. However, there are now signs that it’s going to be much better-looking — if not necessarily more functional. Android Police has obtained…

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

Sometimes you get a potentially great job opportunity, but you have to travel to go to an interview. Consider asking the interviewer to split some of the costs before agreeing to attend.

Over at Ask the Headhunter they tackle the question of who foots the bill for a job interview: the applicant or the employer. Usually with entry-level jobs, this isn’t an issue. But when recruiters contact you for a very specific skill set, things are different. These employers know you aren’t local and travel usually comes later in the interview process. First interviews are usually over email or skype these days, so the employer already has a strong interest if you are invited for an out-of-town interview.

They may decline to pay the expenses upfront, but just like every aspect of the hiring process, this denial is negotiable. When you pay the expenses upfront, you take on all the risk. If you’ve been out of work for a period of time, you may not have the money to pay airfare, hotel, and meals. Ask the Headhunter has a nice compromise to propose to your potential employer:

Split the costs into portions that each of you pay up front, and settle the rest later. For example, make them this offer: If they pre-pay the airline ticket, you will pay for the hotel and meals and then submit for reimbursement. That way you don’t get stuck holding the entire bag, even if they ignore your requests later. Of course, if they decline to front any costs for your trip, you must decide whether to gamble. My advice is: Don’t. A company that won’t pay to fly you out is trouble.

Check out the link for other ways to maximize your opportunities when interviewing for a position out of town.

Make interview travel pay off | Ask the Headhunter

Photo by Alan Cleaver.

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

Sometimes you get a potentially great job opportunity, but you have to travel to go to an interview. Consider asking the interviewer to split some of the costs before agreeing to attend.

Over at Ask the Headhunter they tackle the question of who foots the bill for a job interview: the applicant or the employer. Usually with entry-level jobs, this isn’t an issue. But when recruiters contact you for a very specific skill set, things are different. These employers know you aren’t local and travel usually comes later in the interview process. First interviews are usually over email or skype these days, so the employer already has a strong interest if you are invited for an out-of-town interview.

They may decline to pay the expenses upfront, but just like every aspect of the hiring process, this denial is negotiable. When you pay the expenses upfront, you take on all the risk. If you’ve been out of work for a period of time, you may not have the money to pay airfare, hotel, and meals. Ask the Headhunter has a nice compromise to propose to your potential employer:

Split the costs into portions that each of you pay up front, and settle the rest later. For example, make them this offer: If they pre-pay the airline ticket, you will pay for the hotel and meals and then submit for reimbursement. That way you don’t get stuck holding the entire bag, even if they ignore your requests later. Of course, if they decline to front any costs for your trip, you must decide whether to gamble. My advice is: Don’t. A company that won’t pay to fly you out is trouble.

Check out the link for other ways to maximize your opportunities when interviewing for a position out of town.

Make interview travel pay off | Ask the Headhunter

Photo by Alan Cleaver.

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

Sometimes you get a potentially great job opportunity, but you have to travel to go to an interview. Consider asking the interviewer to split some of the costs before agreeing to attend.

Over at Ask the Headhunter they tackle the question of who foots the bill for a job interview: the applicant or the employer. Usually with entry-level jobs, this isn’t an issue. But when recruiters contact you for a very specific skill set, things are different. These employers know you aren’t local and travel usually comes later in the interview process. First interviews are usually over email or skype these days, so the employer already has a strong interest if you are invited for an out-of-town interview.

They may decline to pay the expenses upfront, but just like every aspect of the hiring process, this denial is negotiable. When you pay the expenses upfront, you take on all the risk. If you’ve been out of work for a period of time, you may not have the money to pay airfare, hotel, and meals. Ask the Headhunter has a nice compromise to propose to your potential employer:

Split the costs into portions that each of you pay up front, and settle the rest later. For example, make them this offer: If they pre-pay the airline ticket, you will pay for the hotel and meals and then submit for reimbursement. That way you don’t get stuck holding the entire bag, even if they ignore your requests later. Of course, if they decline to front any costs for your trip, you must decide whether to gamble. My advice is: Don’t. A company that won’t pay to fly you out is trouble.

Check out the link for other ways to maximize your opportunities when interviewing for a position out of town.

Make interview travel pay off | Ask the Headhunter

Photo by Alan Cleaver.

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

​Ask to Split the Cost of Your Next Interview if You Have to Travel

Sometimes you get a potentially great job opportunity, but you have to travel to go to an interview. Consider asking the interviewer to split some of the costs before agreeing to attend.

Over at Ask the Headhunter they tackle the question of who foots the bill for a job interview: the applicant or the employer. Usually with entry-level jobs, this isn’t an issue. But when recruiters contact you for a very specific skill set, things are different. These employers know you aren’t local and travel usually comes later in the interview process. First interviews are usually over email or skype these days, so the employer already has a strong interest if you are invited for an out-of-town interview.

They may decline to pay the expenses upfront, but just like every aspect of the hiring process, this denial is negotiable. When you pay the expenses upfront, you take on all the risk. If you’ve been out of work for a period of time, you may not have the money to pay airfare, hotel, and meals. Ask the Headhunter has a nice compromise to propose to your potential employer:

Split the costs into portions that each of you pay up front, and settle the rest later. For example, make them this offer: If they pre-pay the airline ticket, you will pay for the hotel and meals and then submit for reimbursement. That way you don’t get stuck holding the entire bag, even if they ignore your requests later. Of course, if they decline to front any costs for your trip, you must decide whether to gamble. My advice is: Don’t. A company that won’t pay to fly you out is trouble.

Check out the link for other ways to maximize your opportunities when interviewing for a position out of town.

Make interview travel pay off | Ask the Headhunter

Photo by Alan Cleaver.