Monthly Archives: May 2015

You are browsing the site archives by month.

Solar Impulse 2 begins world’s longest flight: Six days, five nights non-stop

Solar Impulse 2, which is attempting the world’s first solar-powered circumnavigation of Earth, has begun the longest leg of its journey: a single, non-stop flight of about 5078 miles (8172km) from China to Hawaii. The plane, and pilot André Borschberg, will be aloft for six days and five nights, with Borschberg attempting to stay awake for much of that time.

The solar-powered aircraft, which has a larger wingspan than a 747, began its round-the-world trip in March. It departed from Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, headed down the Persian Gulf to Oman, hopped over to India, then Myanmar, and finally into Nanjing in China at the end of April. You can watch the current flight live on the Solar Impulse website. (The website is pretty cool; you should check it out.)

This flight, from Nanjing to Hawaii, is the first true test of Solar Impulse’s capabilities, and Borschberg’s endurance. The previous six legs were all fairly short hops; this, the seventh leg, will be longer than the previous six flights combined. The flight to Hawaii will finally showcase whether a solar airplane can reliably stay aloft at night, with lithium-ion batteries providing all of the necessary juice.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Photos From The Greenwich Concours d’Elegance

The Greenwich Concours d’Elegance is an event that happens once a year in Connecticut. It seems as if every car enthusiast in the northeast makes the pilgrimage to see and bid on many wonderful vehicles. This makes for a very large and extravagant event. It also makes for a neat parking lot . Thankfully, the rain held up for much of the morning, and a great time was had by all.

Read more…

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube