Monthly Archives: June 2018

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Leak shows the Samsung folding phone that might have been

Samsung has been talking about making folding phones for years with little to show for it, but it might have come closer to doing that than you think. A leaker has claimed to have photos of "Project V," a dual-screen phone that would have been in dev…

My Cars Have Always Reflected The Best Times In My Life

So often we tie our cars to the great events in our lives. This is my story.

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Fox turns ad breaks into dramas in bid to fight ad skipping

There's little doubt that TV's commercial breaks are on the decline. How do you get people to watch ads in an era of ad-skipping DVRs and commercial-free streaming services like Netflix or Hulu? Fox Networks has an idea: turn ad time into mini dram…

What It Was Like Getting My First Driver’s License At 31 Years Old

Not many residents of the Lower East Side of Manhattan owned cars in the 1960s and 1970s. A metal subway token, and a dose of courage, would get you to almost any corner in New York City your heart desired. The East Broadway subway station of the F train and the bus stop (for my daily trips to and from high school)…

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The best drip coffee maker

By Cale Guthrie Weissman and Liz Clayton This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read the full article…

This Amazing Artist Stayed Awake All Night To Capture The 24 Hours Of Le Mans In 24 Pieces

This year, during the 24 Hours of Le Mans race, artist and photographer Jayson Fong sat down to his desk to produce one piece of art for each hour of the race. A motorsport fanatic of the first degree, Jayson’s art is usually quite detailed. For this endeavor, however, he needed to finish a piece quite quickly, and it…

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Blame The FIA For How Boring The 24 Hours Of Le Mans Was This Year

There are a lot of awful rule sets in the world of racing, but this season the ACO and the FIA have combined to produce what is perhaps the worst rule in racing history. While the rule was technically implemented at the 6-hour race at Spa last month, the full extent of its impact on endurance racing was shown in stark…

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Beyoncé and Jay-Z take digs at Spotify in latest Tidal exclusive

Beyoncé and Jay-Z aren't keeping quiet in the wake of Tidal's scandals around inflated numbers and late royalties… if anything, they're ramping things up. The power couple have released a joint album exclusive to the service, Everything is L…

Sunday’s Best Deals: Brother Scanner, Vitamix Blender, Clear the Rack, and More

Celebrate Father’s Day with deals on a Brother scanner, a Vitamix blender, the last day of Nordstrom Rack’s Clear the Rack, and more

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The President is Missing… a few finer points on how the cyber works in this novel

Enlarge / LONDON: A President Trump impersonator poses in a mock-up of the Oval Office to promote the global release of James Patterson and Bill Clinton’s book, The President is Missing at Waterloo Station. (credit: Eamonn M. McCormack / Getty Images)

If you hadn’t heard, former President William Jefferson Clinton and well-established mass-production author James Patterson have collaborated on a novel titled The President is Missing. The book is a political cyber-thriller of sorts, the second such book from a member of the Clinton family—that is, if you count Hillary Clinton’s What Happened as one. And just as with with Ms. Clinton’s book, The President is Missing gives shout outs to Russian hacking groups, mentioning Fancy Bear by name.

The President is Missing is, however, a work of fiction. At 513 pages in hardcover, it’s slightly slimmer than the recently-released Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General report on the FBI’s conduct during the Clinton email investigation, and certainly better paced—with Patterson’s trademarked five-to-10 page chapters cutting it up for easy digestion. The prose is largely marked by Patterson’s hand as well, but there are places where Clinton’s voice pushes through (and not always for the better)—particularly in the passages of first-person narration from the protagonist, President Jon Duncan, which are laden with Democratic talking points and the moral weight of every presidential decision.

The plot, in brief, is this: a Democratic president from a southern state is on the verge of facing an impeachment (sound familiar?) in the midst of a national security crisis. A terrorist mastermind has managed to plant “wiper” malware in every computer in the United States. Racing against time, the president disguises himself, exits the White House through a secret tunnel, and meets in person with the hacker who helped distribute the malware while a crack mercenary hit squad led by a pregnant Bosnian sniper attempts to take the hacker and President Duncan out.

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