Today Only, Great Deals On Some Of Your And Our Favorite Logitech Peripherals

Today Only, Great Deals On Some Of Your And Our Favorite Logitech Peripherals

Amazon’s Gold Box is overflowing with Logitech computing accessories today, ranging from keyboards and mice to entire surround sound systems. The entire list is full of great deals, especially for gamers, but we broke out a few highlights below, all of which carry record low prices. A lot of these would make great gifts as well, so you can knock out a nice chunk of your holiday shopping before Black Friday even hits. [Amazon]


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This post is brought to you by the Commerce Team, a dedicated group of deal hunters and product enthusiasts. We operate independently of Editorial to bring you the best bargains every day, share our favorite products with you, and ask you about yours. When you buy something we recommend, we may also get a small share of the sale. We welcome your questions and want your feedback.

IRL: the Samsung Galaxy Round is a curved Note 3 that costs way too much

Welcome to IRL, an ongoing feature where we talk about the gadgets, apps and toys we’re using in real life and take a second look at products that already got the formal review treatment.

IRL: the Samsung Galaxy Round is a curved Note 3 that costs way too much

Flat smartphones are so early 2013; concave is the new hotness. At least, that’s what Samsung and LG might have you believe: both companies have brought new curved displays to a limited market for an extremely high price. The Samsung Galaxy Round and the LG G Flex probably won’t be on most people’s wish lists, as each one costs well above $900 in Korea. Still, we have a feeling we’ll be seeing plenty more (for a lower price) in the not-too-distant future. If this is indeed a sign of things to come, why shouldn’t we want to spend more time with the phone that started the whole craze? Fortunately for us, our friends at Negri Electronics — an online retailer which sells the Galaxy Round and G Flex — offered us the chance to use an imported Korean version for a few days. Take a look at the galleries below and read on for some detailed impressions.%Gallery-slideshow122862%

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Watch Two Guys Hilariously Go Nuts With A Snake On The Windshield

Everything, including the people, can kill you in Australia. This is a Fact. But what do you do when a venomous snake ends up on your windshield? You hit the wipers, obviously. Except now you have a very pissed-off and very Australian snake being smeared across your car. Cue the screaming.

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Time Machines: Say 01100011 01101000 01100101 01100101 01110011 01100101!

Welcome to Time Machines, where we offer up a selection of mechanical oddities, milestone gadgets and unique inventions to test out your tech-history skills.

Today the world can easily be captured in 1s and 0s for our viewing pleasure. The hardware behind this capability all started as a DIY lab project in 1974 to test out some new gear, and the result was a Frankenstein-like device that would eventually lead to world-changing advances in photographic technology. Head on past the break for the full story.

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Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Whether you’re hitting the road or taking to the skies this travel season, you could do with a digital companion to help you plan your itinerary, make sure your tickets and connections are all lined up, and that you have plenty of time to do everything you want (or need) to do while you’re traveling. This week, we’re looking at five of the best travel planning apps or services, based on your nominations.

Earlier in the week we asked you which travel planning apps or services were the best. Keep in mind we’re talking about travel planning, not travel booking, so the apps that can help you find a good deal and land a great price may not be the same apps as the ones that will show you all of your flight details, make sure you’ll make your connection, help you dig out your rental car confirmation number, and so on. Without further ado, here’s what you suggested, in no particular order:

Tripit

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TripIt is the type of app that almost needs no introduction. When it comes to travel planning, it won’t suggest destinations for you, or help you plan the best possible way to spend your time in town wherever you go, but what TripIt does offer is a complete, hassle free way to combine all of your travel confirmations, itineraries, tickets, hotel bookings, rental car reservations, and the rest in one simple view. That view then becomes the central hub for all of your travel needs—no more fishing for a confirmation email to get your reservation number, or wondering what flight number you’re on before you check in; it’s all right there, and it’s all incredibly handy. It’ll even let you know if there’s a better seat on your flight so you can switch to it. As someone who uses TripIt when he travels, I wouldn’t leave home without it.

We covered TripIt when it launched, and we’ve mentioned it several times since then. Those of you who praised it in the call for contenders called out the fact that it’s also easy to share trip plans with people who may need to know where you are, like friends in town or loved ones picking you up from the airport, so they know what flight you’re on and when you’ll arrive, or where you’re staying and when. Sync it with your Google Calendar, set up a few mail rules to push your travel confirmations to TripIt, and you have a custom built itinerary, automatically, every time you travel. You can grab the TripIt mobile apps for iOS, Android, and other platforms here.


TouristEye

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TouristEye is a little different; instead of helping you organize your trip or helping you find the best prices and options for your trip, it helps you build a "wishlist" of destinations where you’d like to travel and experiences you’d like to have. It doesn’t have to be as fancy as a once-in-a-lifetime trip, either: the app is great for planning your annual family vacation (if you get to take one, that is), or if you want to just take a few day trips here or there. Of course, you can build your bucket-list of places you want to see before you die, and you can share that list with friends or family and collaborate with them on them. They can add waypoints and things to check out in the area, specific things to do when you’re there, and together you can plan a trip together. Then, when you’re on the road, you can look back over those plans with detailed information, links, maps, and more.

Those of you who praised TouristEye highlighted the collaboration aspect of the service, and the fact that it’s easy to get ideas for trips of all sizes, find inspiration of places to go, or just read travel tips and suggestions from other users. The service was recently purchased by Lonely Planet, which ideally is a good thing, and while the service is coy about its features on its front page (it prompts you to just start planning trips), you can read more about its features here. Similarly, you can pick up the TouristEye iPhone app and Android app to give the service a whirl on the go.


TripCase

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Much like TripIt and Worldmate, TripCase is another service that aims to centralize all of your travel documentation and planning in one handy interface that’s easy to refer to both before you leave for your trip, and on the go while you’re out and about. TripCase gives you an easy to use interface on your mobile devices to add your flight, train, hotel, rental car, and other information, or you can send all of your confirmations directly over to TripCase and have them automatically organized for you. From there, you have the option to view your trip in the timeline-based "itinerary" view, where you see each step of your trip laid out in front of you along with relevant times and places for each, or the "action" view, which adds more detail for each step of the way and shows you important information for each leg, like flight alerts and other notifications (flight alerts, which it should be noted, are free with TripCase.)

Those of you who highlighted TripCase noted the fact that it integrates nicely with corporate travel systems like Sabre, and while it’s a matter of opinion, said that it was easier to use than its alternatives. To its credit, TripCase does make getting things like driving directions, alternate flights, and other on-the-fly travel info that you may need in a pinch very easy at a time when it may be most frustrating to run down—when you’re on the go and using your phone. You can grab the TripCase mobile apps for iOS and Android here.


TripAdvisor

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TripAdvisor is the quintessential travel planning service. It’s not going to collect your travel information and help you plan out each leg of your trip and when you need to get where you have to go, but it will help you plan your trip from the beginning, much like TouristEye (and unlike TripIt, WorldMate, and TripCase.) Plus, since TripAdvisor is arguably the web’s largest repository of hotel and destination reviews, ratings, photos, and other information, it’s difficult to use any of the other services without finding TripAdvisor data integrated somewhere. If you’re headed to a hotel you’ve never stayed at, TripAdvisor is your best bet to see if there are amenities you need, or if people who have stayed there before report horror stories in their wake. Similarly, it’s a great site to use to plan destination getaways, huge trips, or find resorts and other places you’d love to retreat to.

Those of you who praised TripAdvisor highlghted the fact that it’s a fantastic resource for travelers of all stripes, and the fact that it’s great for finding new and interesting destinations as well as figuring out what to do when you’re in a given place. Of course, if you know you want to go to a specific place but don’t know how to get there, where to stay, or what to do, TripAdvisor will help walk you through that process as well. Just tell it where you want to go and when, and it’ll help you find hotel rooms, flights, and so on. It’ll even keep all of those confirmations organzied in your account for easy reference later. It is, by and large, the default service to answer the question: "I’d like to go to X place, I wonder what I should do while I’m there." Plus, it’s packed with travel tips and tricks from experts, business travelers, and enthusiasts. Grab the TripAdvisor mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone here.


WorldMate

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

WorldMate is aimed firmly at business and frequent travelers, but you don’t have to be one to use and make the most of the app. Like other robust travel planning and organization tools, you can use it to get all of your itineraries and reservations in one place, and then add other destinations, appointments, meetings, and events that you need to attend when you’re out and about. WorldMate has some very business-friendly service integrations too, like LinkedIn, for example. You can use WorldMate on the web or on your smartphone to organize your trips, and you can either use their TripCatch service to automatically pull in your travel info, or you can send it over piecemeal, whichever you prefer.

One useful feature that WorldMate offers above some of the other tools like it are its automatic travel briefings and alerts; or notifications when there’s something you should know about the place you’re going, your scheduled events for the day, connecting flight information (as soon as you land), and so on. Paying users get features like flight status alerts. Everyone gets some other useful features, like a real-time currency converter, weather forecasts for your destination (or each leg of your trip), world clocks, and more. You can grab WorldMate’s mobile apps for iOS and Android here.


There you have it! Each app is a little different from the others, and they all have their own strengths, but as always, only one can be the community favorite. Cast your vote in the poll below.

This week’s honorable mention goes out to Roadtrippers, which is iOS and web-only, but it’s fantastic at giving you off the beaten path destination suggestions, and a great way to plan out every nuance of your trip before you leave the house. If you’re planning a road trip specifically, it’s great—just give it your starting point and your destination, and it’ll show you interesting things along your route from great restaurants to places movies were filmed and more. You can add your own waypoints, and it even helps you estimate how much gas you’ll use along the way.

Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn’t included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don’t just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.

The Hive Five is based on reader nominations. As with most Hive Five posts, if your favorite was left out, it didn’t get the nominations required in the call for contenders post to make the top five. We understand it’s a bit of a popularity contest. Have a suggestion for the Hive Five? Send us an email at tips+hivefive@lifehacker.com!

Title photo by yuheitomi.

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Whether you’re hitting the road or taking to the skies this travel season, you could do with a digital companion to help you plan your itinerary, make sure your tickets and connections are all lined up, and that you have plenty of time to do everything you want (or need) to do while you’re traveling. This week, we’re looking at five of the best travel planning apps or services, based on your nominations.

Earlier in the week we asked you which travel planning apps or services were the best. Keep in mind we’re talking about travel planning, not travel booking, so the apps that can help you find a good deal and land a great price may not be the same apps as the ones that will show you all of your flight details, make sure you’ll make your connection, help you dig out your rental car confirmation number, and so on. Without further ado, here’s what you suggested, in no particular order:

Tripit

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TripIt is the type of app that almost needs no introduction. When it comes to travel planning, it won’t suggest destinations for you, or help you plan the best possible way to spend your time in town wherever you go, but what TripIt does offer is a complete, hassle free way to combine all of your travel confirmations, itineraries, tickets, hotel bookings, rental car reservations, and the rest in one simple view. That view then becomes the central hub for all of your travel needs—no more fishing for a confirmation email to get your reservation number, or wondering what flight number you’re on before you check in; it’s all right there, and it’s all incredibly handy. It’ll even let you know if there’s a better seat on your flight so you can switch to it. As someone who uses TripIt when he travels, I wouldn’t leave home without it.

We covered TripIt when it launched, and we’ve mentioned it several times since then. Those of you who praised it in the call for contenders called out the fact that it’s also easy to share trip plans with people who may need to know where you are, like friends in town or loved ones picking you up from the airport, so they know what flight you’re on and when you’ll arrive, or where you’re staying and when. Sync it with your Google Calendar, set up a few mail rules to push your travel confirmations to TripIt, and you have a custom built itinerary, automatically, every time you travel. You can grab the TripIt mobile apps for iOS, Android, and other platforms here.


TouristEye

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TouristEye is a little different; instead of helping you organize your trip or helping you find the best prices and options for your trip, it helps you build a "wishlist" of destinations where you’d like to travel and experiences you’d like to have. It doesn’t have to be as fancy as a once-in-a-lifetime trip, either: the app is great for planning your annual family vacation (if you get to take one, that is), or if you want to just take a few day trips here or there. Of course, you can build your bucket-list of places you want to see before you die, and you can share that list with friends or family and collaborate with them on them. They can add waypoints and things to check out in the area, specific things to do when you’re there, and together you can plan a trip together. Then, when you’re on the road, you can look back over those plans with detailed information, links, maps, and more.

Those of you who praised TouristEye highlighted the collaboration aspect of the service, and the fact that it’s easy to get ideas for trips of all sizes, find inspiration of places to go, or just read travel tips and suggestions from other users. The service was recently purchased by Lonely Planet, which ideally is a good thing, and while the service is coy about its features on its front page (it prompts you to just start planning trips), you can read more about its features here. Similarly, you can pick up the TouristEye iPhone app and Android app to give the service a whirl on the go.


TripCase

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

Much like TripIt and Worldmate, TripCase is another service that aims to centralize all of your travel documentation and planning in one handy interface that’s easy to refer to both before you leave for your trip, and on the go while you’re out and about. TripCase gives you an easy to use interface on your mobile devices to add your flight, train, hotel, rental car, and other information, or you can send all of your confirmations directly over to TripCase and have them automatically organized for you. From there, you have the option to view your trip in the timeline-based "itinerary" view, where you see each step of your trip laid out in front of you along with relevant times and places for each, or the "action" view, which adds more detail for each step of the way and shows you important information for each leg, like flight alerts and other notifications (flight alerts, which it should be noted, are free with TripCase.)

Those of you who highlighted TripCase noted the fact that it integrates nicely with corporate travel systems like Sabre, and while it’s a matter of opinion, said that it was easier to use than its alternatives. To its credit, TripCase does make getting things like driving directions, alternate flights, and other on-the-fly travel info that you may need in a pinch very easy at a time when it may be most frustrating to run down—when you’re on the go and using your phone. You can grab the TripCase mobile apps for iOS and Android here.


TripAdvisor

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

TripAdvisor is the quintessential travel planning service. It’s not going to collect your travel information and help you plan out each leg of your trip and when you need to get where you have to go, but it will help you plan your trip from the beginning, much like TouristEye (and unlike TripIt, WorldMate, and TripCase.) Plus, since TripAdvisor is arguably the web’s largest repository of hotel and destination reviews, ratings, photos, and other information, it’s difficult to use any of the other services without finding TripAdvisor data integrated somewhere. If you’re headed to a hotel you’ve never stayed at, TripAdvisor is your best bet to see if there are amenities you need, or if people who have stayed there before report horror stories in their wake. Similarly, it’s a great site to use to plan destination getaways, huge trips, or find resorts and other places you’d love to retreat to.

Those of you who praised TripAdvisor highlghted the fact that it’s a fantastic resource for travelers of all stripes, and the fact that it’s great for finding new and interesting destinations as well as figuring out what to do when you’re in a given place. Of course, if you know you want to go to a specific place but don’t know how to get there, where to stay, or what to do, TripAdvisor will help walk you through that process as well. Just tell it where you want to go and when, and it’ll help you find hotel rooms, flights, and so on. It’ll even keep all of those confirmations organzied in your account for easy reference later. It is, by and large, the default service to answer the question: "I’d like to go to X place, I wonder what I should do while I’m there." Plus, it’s packed with travel tips and tricks from experts, business travelers, and enthusiasts. Grab the TripAdvisor mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone here.


WorldMate

Five Best Travel Planning Apps

WorldMate is aimed firmly at business and frequent travelers, but you don’t have to be one to use and make the most of the app. Like other robust travel planning and organization tools, you can use it to get all of your itineraries and reservations in one place, and then add other destinations, appointments, meetings, and events that you need to attend when you’re out and about. WorldMate has some very business-friendly service integrations too, like LinkedIn, for example. You can use WorldMate on the web or on your smartphone to organize your trips, and you can either use their TripCatch service to automatically pull in your travel info, or you can send it over piecemeal, whichever you prefer.

One useful feature that WorldMate offers above some of the other tools like it are its automatic travel briefings and alerts; or notifications when there’s something you should know about the place you’re going, your scheduled events for the day, connecting flight information (as soon as you land), and so on. Paying users get features like flight status alerts. Everyone gets some other useful features, like a real-time currency converter, weather forecasts for your destination (or each leg of your trip), world clocks, and more. You can grab WorldMate’s mobile apps for iOS and Android here.


There you have it! Each app is a little different from the others, and they all have their own strengths, but as always, only one can be the community favorite. Cast your vote in the poll below.

This week’s honorable mention goes out to Roadtrippers, which is iOS and web-only, but it’s fantastic at giving you off the beaten path destination suggestions, and a great way to plan out every nuance of your trip before you leave the house. If you’re planning a road trip specifically, it’s great—just give it your starting point and your destination, and it’ll show you interesting things along your route from great restaurants to places movies were filmed and more. You can add your own waypoints, and it even helps you estimate how much gas you’ll use along the way.

Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn’t included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don’t just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.

The Hive Five is based on reader nominations. As with most Hive Five posts, if your favorite was left out, it didn’t get the nominations required in the call for contenders post to make the top five. We understand it’s a bit of a popularity contest. Have a suggestion for the Hive Five? Send us an email at tips+hivefive@lifehacker.com!

Title photo by yuheitomi.

Woman on First Walk Since Motorcycle Accident Gets Run Over By Car

Woman on First Walk Since Motorcycle Accident Gets Run Over By Car

A Virginia woman who survived both cancer and a devastating motorcycle accident was struck and killed by a car last Sunday, during her first walk outdoors since her accident six months ago.

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Amazon’s next-gen Kindle Paperwhite reportedly arriving in Q2 with a sharper screen, lighter design

Amazon's next-gen Kindle Paperwhite reportedly arriving in Q2 with a sharper screen, lighter design

Amazon only just released a new Kindle Paperwhite e-reader two months ago, but we’re already hearing rumors that a newer model is on the way. According to a new report from TechCrunch, the new version, to be released in early Q2 of next year, will boast a sharper 300-pixel-per-inch screen, allowing it to better compete with models like the Kobo Aura, which has a 265-ppi screen. (Not that Kobo’s represents much of a threat to Amazon’s book-selling empire.) Also it’s worth noting that E Ink makes the displays for basically all these e-readers, so it seems unlikely that Amazon would hold an exclusive on a 300-ppi panel — at least not for long.

Additionally, TechCrunch claims the new Paperwhite will have a lighter design that mimics the new Kindle Fire HDX tablets, with chamfered edges, a rear power button and a glass screen that sits flush with the bezels. The device is also rumored to have haptic feedback along the edges, which will give vibrating feedback when you do things like move to the next page. There’s no big software update planned, apparently, although Amazon is said to be working on a new custom font that’s more conducive to marathon reading sessions. We suppose if this report is true, all will be revealed over the coming months — hopefully those of you who just bought a new Paperwhite won’t be too cheesed off by the timing.

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Source: TechCrunch

U.S. Taxpayers Out $139 Million As Fisker Files For Bankruptcy

U.S. Taxpayers Out $139 Million As Fisker Files For Bankruptcy

Fisker, the perennially-challenged but incredibly innovative hybrid car manufacturer, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. No, it technically hadn’t before, despite suspending operations. And no, this might not be the end of the company. Maybe. Hopefully.

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Inhabitat’s Week in Green: Apple’s new headquarters, rocket-powered bike and bees that detect cancer

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week’s most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us — it’s the Week in Green.

A flying saucer is set to land in Silicon Valley! This week, the Cupertino City Council gave a big thumbs-up to Apple’s new $5 billion headquarters. The circular building is designed by Foster + Partners, and it looks like a futuristic wonderland for tech workers. Lego bricks are mighty popular in the design world, but can you imagine an entire house that snaps together? That’s the basic idea behind Eric Schimelpfening’s WikiHouse, which can be customized to fit a user’s needs and created using a 3D printer. In other green architecture news, starchitect Zaha Hadid shared images of her proposed Qatar World Cup stadium, which will use passive design to cool itself. Architect Sou Fujimoto released plans for a complex in Doha that uses the mist from interior waterfalls to provide relief from the region’s intense heat. The world-famous Swedish Ice Hotel is one structure that doesn’t need to worry about keeping cool. Quite the contrary: Swedish law requires that the owners of the structure, which is made from ice, install fire alarms to comply with national building regulations.

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