Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

When life deals us a tough hand, it’s natural to get frustrated and wallow in self pity. Unfortunately, that’s not very productive, so Guy Neyens at Tiny Buddha suggests his own four step process for overcoming the curveballs of life. Guy’s four steps are simple, but work well when used in combination:

  1. Accept and let go.
  2. Observe and decide.
  3. Face your fears and take action.
  4. Practice gratitude.

Rule #1 suggests that we stop blaming ourselves for getting into these predicaments. What happened in the past should stay in the past. Second, you should look at the problem from a detached, unemotional viewpoint, and gather all the facts. Third, you need to get over whatever preconceptions or fears you might have, and enact a solution. His fourth step though is my personal favorite:

You may label problems as such because dealing with them takes you out of your comfort zone. Dealing with them in the correct manner means you are growing as a person. So, learn to be grateful for the challenges in your life, because they make you stronger.

Taken separately, these are all great techniques for dealing with stressful situations, but methodically going through them one by one should help you tackle anything. Be sure to check out the source link for some more details on each step, and read about how Guy used this method to pull himself out of debt.

A 4-Step Plan to Deal with Even the Toughest Challenge | Tiny Buddha

Photo by ollyy (Shutterstock).

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

When life deals us a tough hand, it’s natural to get frustrated and wallow in self pity. Unfortunately, that’s not very productive, so Guy Neyens at Tiny Buddha suggests his own four step process for overcoming the curveballs of life. Guy’s four steps are simple, but work well when used in combination:

  1. Accept and let go.
  2. Observe and decide.
  3. Face your fears and take action.
  4. Practice gratitude.

Rule #1 suggests that we stop blaming ourselves for getting into these predicaments. What happened in the past should stay in the past. Second, you should look at the problem from a detached, unemotional viewpoint, and gather all the facts. Third, you need to get over whatever preconceptions or fears you might have, and enact a solution. His fourth step though is my personal favorite:

You may label problems as such because dealing with them takes you out of your comfort zone. Dealing with them in the correct manner means you are growing as a person. So, learn to be grateful for the challenges in your life, because they make you stronger.

Taken separately, these are all great techniques for dealing with stressful situations, but methodically going through them one by one should help you tackle anything. Be sure to check out the source link for some more details on each step, and read about how Guy used this method to pull himself out of debt.

A 4-Step Plan to Deal with Even the Toughest Challenge | Tiny Buddha

Photo by ollyy (Shutterstock).

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

When life deals us a tough hand, it’s natural to get frustrated and wallow in self pity. Unfortunately, that’s not very productive, so Guy Neyens at Tiny Buddha suggests his own four step process for overcoming the curveballs of life. Guy’s four steps are simple, but work well when used in combination:

  1. Accept and let go.
  2. Observe and decide.
  3. Face your fears and take action.
  4. Practice gratitude.

Rule #1 suggests that we stop blaming ourselves for getting into these predicaments. What happened in the past should stay in the past. Second, you should look at the problem from a detached, unemotional viewpoint, and gather all the facts. Third, you need to get over whatever preconceptions or fears you might have, and enact a solution. His fourth step though is my personal favorite:

You may label problems as such because dealing with them takes you out of your comfort zone. Dealing with them in the correct manner means you are growing as a person. So, learn to be grateful for the challenges in your life, because they make you stronger.

Taken separately, these are all great techniques for dealing with stressful situations, but methodically going through them one by one should help you tackle anything. Be sure to check out the source link for some more details on each step, and read about how Guy used this method to pull himself out of debt.

A 4-Step Plan to Deal with Even the Toughest Challenge | Tiny Buddha

Photo by ollyy (Shutterstock).

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

Meet Any Challenge Head On with This Four Step System

When life deals us a tough hand, it’s natural to get frustrated and wallow in self pity. Unfortunately, that’s not very productive, so Guy Neyens at Tiny Buddha suggests his own four step process for overcoming the curveballs of life. Guy’s four steps are simple, but work well when used in combination:

  1. Accept and let go.
  2. Observe and decide.
  3. Face your fears and take action.
  4. Practice gratitude.

Rule #1 suggests that we stop blaming ourselves for getting into these predicaments. What happened in the past should stay in the past. Second, you should look at the problem from a detached, unemotional viewpoint, and gather all the facts. Third, you need to get over whatever preconceptions or fears you might have, and enact a solution. His fourth step though is my personal favorite:

You may label problems as such because dealing with them takes you out of your comfort zone. Dealing with them in the correct manner means you are growing as a person. So, learn to be grateful for the challenges in your life, because they make you stronger.

Taken separately, these are all great techniques for dealing with stressful situations, but methodically going through them one by one should help you tackle anything. Be sure to check out the source link for some more details on each step, and read about how Guy used this method to pull himself out of debt.

A 4-Step Plan to Deal with Even the Toughest Challenge | Tiny Buddha

Photo by ollyy (Shutterstock).

Exclusive: an early look at Intel’s own phone UI, “Obsidian”

Obsidian’s start-up sequence (video link)

Intel is planning its own UI overlay, codenamed “Obsidian,” that it will bring to the mobile operating system Tizen and possibly Android, eventually. A source working at Intel has tipped Ars with several early screenshots and some video of Intel’s Obsidian project, which includes a handful of unique UI touches.

Tizen, a mobile operating system backed by the Linux Foundation, Samsung, and Intel, has yet to ship on any physical devices. Samsung announced that it plans to launch Tizen devices later this year, mainly in Eastern markets. Intel’s Atom chips have also made appearances in a handful of Android phones and tablets, but the company has yet to publicly announce further Tizen devices.

From what we see in the materials passed to us, it’s still fairly early days for Obsidian, and it’s not quite feature-complete yet. The UI overlay appears to use very boxy, closely-packed icons that mirror the flatter designs of Windows Phone and Android over the skeuomorphism of iOS. Three buttons are persistent along the bottom of the screen (phone, messages, and people), which our source says are not analogs for hardware buttons that come later but are meant to be soft keys.

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1950′s NASCAR Racing Was The Best Racing, Because Names

Welcome to Sunday Matinee, where we highlight classic car reviews or other longer videos I find on YouTube. Kick back and enjoy this blast from the past.

One of the most common and overwrought criticisms of NASCAR from people who don’t really know the sport is that it’s all full of rednecks who are from the South and they’re all driving stupid American cars with pushrod V8s and that must mean something.

With drivers like Juan Pablo Montoya and Danica Patrick regularly doing well and millions being spent every year, however, it’s a little bit different from the old tropes. Where the old tropes weren’t wrong, however was the 1950s.

At first you might think that the overlaid bluegrass music (of which I am a fan), or the dirt track, or the old pre-war Fords would make this seem like a NASCAR stereotype. You, my friend, would be wrong. The best and most stereotype-y part about this race are the drivers, and more specifically, the driver’s names. Here’s a sampling:

  • Fuzzy Clifton
  • Shorty York
  • Pee Wee Jones
  • Slim Rominger
  • Perk Brown
  • Spider Stultz
  • Toots Jenkins
  • Whitey Norman
  • Burley Myers
  • Peanut Brown

And, of course, Chicken Boggs. Yeah, a guy was actually called "Chicken."

Now normally I’d see all those aliases and think that this was some sort of Mafia gathering, and everyone was some sort of "made man." Considering the fact that most of these guys were probably bootleggers, though, you wouldn’t be far off.

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

The Canadian Grand Prix was a strange one this year. Not that anything particularly strange happened, because nothing strange happens in Canada, but it was different from most of the past few races there.

In the same way that the last race in Monaco was considered a bit of a blip, as it was exciting, this Grand Prix in Canada was a bit, well, dull. Usually races at Montreal are full of thrills, with unpredictable weather and the especially daring drivers kissing the wall of champions as they slide around the chicane. This time, Sebastian Vettel started from the pole, and he led the pack all the way until the end with a large margin.

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

The sure-fire predictability was perhaps a surprise in itself, considering the fact that the teams had practiced on wet tires throughout a rainy Friday practice and the track temperature doubled under sunny skies for the Sunday race. Even still, the technical wizardry of the Red Bull team seemed to make that a null factor.

The real racing (and strangeness) came towards the back, with Valtteri Bottas battling it out with Fernando Alonso early on and with great helmetcam views, courtesy of Bottas. No crashes ensued on the first lap as well, ensuring a smoother start than the one at Monaco. True Canadian manners were observed shortly after, when Adrian Sutil took a bit of a spin and yet somehow he managed to hit nothing and nothing managed to him.

Still, I admired the free-wheeling style he continued from earlier.

Pastor Maldonado managed to stay relatively quiet in Canada despite causing a collision with Sutil and enduring a drive-through penalty, which was a nice break from his earlier crashing and bashing at Monaco. The real nutter this time, however, was Dutchman Giedo van der Garde.

Van der Garde seemed to be all over this race, first earning a 10-second stop-go drive-through penalty after ignoring blue flags to pull over and causing a bit of an incident on lap 40, and then smashing into Nico Hulkenberg on lap 48.

Van der Garde then proceeded to drag his front wing all around the track while he tried to drive back to the pits. Get it together, Van der Garde. Sutil didn’t help matters either, earning a drive-through penalty in much the same fashion as Van der Garde on lap 61.

There was perhaps no greater violator of Canadian norms, however, than the fans, who hilariously booed Vettel as he was doing his initial post-race interview with Eddie Jordan. The fans’ reaction to Vettel is neatly summed up in this photo:

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

You know, I’m sure he’s a nice guy, but people can’t stop hating him. Probably because every time it’s so funny. And because he has such a friendly demeanor with well-wishers. Here’s that picture again:

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

Hilarious.

Here are the provisional results:

Van Der Garde, Sutil Violate Supreme Rules Of Canadian Politeness

Photos credit: Getty, AP, Getty

Opinion: Congress to vet grant applications?

In the not too distant past, Congress decided that it wanted more direct oversight over science granting. Canada seems to be jumping on the same bandwagon, so maybe it’s something in the water. Scientists were outraged, and there has been much written about how bad an idea this is. But most of the objections have centered on the expertise of legislators—or rather a lack thereof—while the problems actually run a lot deeper than that.

Political oversight: It’s not all bad

I don’t happen to agree that political oversight should be absent from science. Taxpayers pay for science, so they should, through the political process, have some say in funding priorities. This idea can be seen in action in Europe, where science funding has been made largely subservient to societal needs. Funding priorities are set through a consultative and consensus-driven process that combines relevant industries, scientists, and relevant government institutes. Their recommendations are taken to the politicians, who either release the money or make recommendations for changes based on other considerations.

For instance, in energy research, fusion is often specifically excluded because fusion researchers draw on money through ITER, which is government funded. Essentially, everybody (except maybe the fusion researchers) wants to make sure that fusion research doesn’t get two slices of the pie.

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How can I take water on a run without carrying a water bottle?

How can I take water on a run without carrying a water bottle?

AT&T extends upgrade period to two years, continues a worrying trend

AT&T extends upgrade period to full years, continues a worrying trend

The big US carriers tend to echo each other’s customer-hostile policy decisions all too often, and that’s unfortunately happening once again. Effective today, AT&T is shadowing Verizon by extending its standard device upgrade interval from 20 months to the full two years of a typical agreement. All of its new contract subscribers, as well as those whose terms finish in March or later, will have to cope with the longer waiting periods. There’s little context for the decision in a corporate memo that we’ve obtained; we’ve reached out to AT&T for some background, and we’ll let you know if we hear more. Whatever the motivations, it’s clearer than ever that habitual upgraders need to either pay the full hardware price or move to more flexible providers.

[Thanks, anonymous tipster]

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