My BEETLE HAS BEEN SPOTTED! Now Help Me Figure Out Where This is… UPDATE

Commenter Jake posted this comment and took the above pic of my de-headlighted and roof rack’d car. But with no address! Can anyone help me ID the location? Most likely East LA, Boyle Heights, Frogtown, Highland Park… Help!

UPDATE: Thanks to everyone for the assistance. Jason and the police are with the car right now. Follow up story coming as soon as Jason sorts this all out, but obviously you’re all wonderful. – Matt

Hands on with the Pebble watch: a handy device with a lot of potential

After several months of patient waiting, I finally received my Pebble in the mail a few weeks ago. This Pebble is not the kind that gets stuck in your shoe (hopefully); it’s a brand-spankin’-new, Kickstarter-funded “smart watch”—an e-paper bracelet that connects to your iOS and Android devices, which means you can tell the time and do some other cool stuff too.

The “other cool stuff” is the part that had Kickstarter backers excited in early 2012; excited to the tune of $10.2 million. During the fundraiser (which ended in May of last year), backers who pledged $99 or more were promised one Pebble watch, which now retails at $150. While it’s not perfect, it is a rather interesting step forward that should culminate in a healthy platform later this year.

First impressions

At its most basic level, Pebble tells the time. You may scoff at that—it’s a watch you say, of course it tells the time. But it does its time-telling really freakin’ well. It currently ships with three default watch faces, as well as 12 others that you can load onto the watch with the companion app (free on iOS and Android). By far my favorite custom watch face is “Fuzzy Time,” which rounds the current time to the nearest 5-minute interval and translates that number to what you might say if your friend asked you the time. While seemingly trivial, I love this rough approximation of time. Rarely do I need to know that it’s 5:13:23pm, but seeing that it’s “quarter after five” is awesome.

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Meet The Mazda RX-7 Replacement That Never Happened

Welcome to Sunday Matinee, where we highlight classic car reviews or other longer videos I find on YouTube. Kick back and enjoy this blast from the past.

The Mazda RX-7 had an interesting evolution. It started life as an affordable sports car that excelled on the street and on the track. In the 1980s it graduated to doing battle with the Porsche 924 and 944. Then in the 90s it became one of the baddest, most balls-out performance cars of all time.

But with this advancement came a hefty price tag that was hard for Mazda to justify as the Japanese economy started to contract and customers found SUVs more appealing.

So in 1995, right as the RX-7 was about to be phased out in the U.S., Mazda deployed a stylish back-to-basics rotary sports car they called the RX-01. Top Gear presenter Andy Wilman takes it for a spin in this episode. He was impressed with its power and sound, and he seemed pretty confident it would see production.

The RX-01 is a pretty interesting little experiment. Powertrain-wise, it has a lot in common with the RX-8, as it ditched the 7′s twin-turbos for a naturally aspirated rotary setup. It’s also a 2+2 like the RX-8 but manages to be smaller and lighter than the RX-7.

In terms of design it looks like the RX-7 but advanced into the late 90s. I think it looks a bit like the MX-6 or the Millenia from the front. Those doors were definitely inspired by the last RX-7, though.

Alas, financial woes at Mazda and a lack of consumer interest in sports cars doomed the RX-01 to the annals of history. That’s a bit of a shame, as it looked really great. It’s a fascinating example of what might have been.

Would you have taken the RX-01 over an RX-8?

Sony’s 4K TVs Will Be Surprisingly Affordable—in That They Cost Less than a Car

The $25,000 pricetag attached to Sony’s 84-inch UltraHD set—the one that’s been haunting your dreams since CES—may put that super-sized set out of your financial reach but that doesn’t mean everything 4K is prohibitively expensive. In fact, Sony’s new 55- and 65-inch sets are downright inexpensive (by comparison) and will be available for pre-order by the end of the month. More »


Highlight Intangibles in Your Job Interview Based on the Position’s Listed Duties

Highlight Intangibles in Your Job Interview Based on the Position's Listed Duties When you’re at a job interview, it’s important to meet all the listed requirements, but US News & World Report notes that it’s just as critical to emphasize the “intangibles” needed to succeed.

Arnie Fertig at US News & World Report suggests making educated guesses at what these intangibles are based on the job’s official duties.

If you take the time to closely read a job description, you can discern the competencies that are associated with a position’s requirements. For example, one random job posted recently calls for someone to be a “liaison for…”, “gain approval for…”, “track success…”, “contribute to…”, “execute marketing activities…” and “ensure budgets and schedules meet corporate requirements.”

Ask yourself what is required to attain success for each of these bullet points. To be a liaison and gain approval for things, one must have solid oral and written communication skills. To track success, you must be detail oriented, and likely have the ability to negotiate spreadsheets. To contribute, someone most likely requires a collegial, team-based approach to work. To keep budgets on track likely requires someone with a head for numbers.

I think this tip is perhaps best-suited for interviews where you don’t have prior experience with certain job duties, and need to convey that you could learn them. Maybe you’ve never telecommuted before, but you could emphasize your written communication skills and ability to work independently if a job requires some remote work. If the position involves creating web traffic reports, but you never did that at your old job, you could highlight your quantitative reasoning skills and analytical mind.

Once you’ve identified the competencies you want to highlight, think up some good anecdotes from your previous work that demonstrate them. Depending on how subtle these qualities are, they might not explicitly come up during the interview, but you can work in references to them during your other answers. Check out the source link for some more job interview tips.

The Two Things Savvy Interviewers Are Looking For | US News & World Report

The HTC One Review

It is nearly impossible to begin to review the HTC One without some context, and I’ll begin our review of the HTC One (formerly the device known as codename M7) much the same way I did my impressions piece simply by stating that HTC is in an interesting position as a result of last year’s product cycle. If there’s one thing Anand has really driven home for me in my time writing for AnandTech, it’s that in the fast-paced mobile industry, a silicon vendor or OEM really only has to miss one product cycle in a very bad way to get into a very difficult position. The reality of things is that for HTC with this last product cycle there were products with solid industrial design and specs for the most part, but not the right wins with mobile operators in the United States, and not the right marketing message abroad. It’s easy to armchair the previous product cycle now that we have a year of perspective, but that’s the reality of things. HTC now needs a winner more than ever.

For 2013 HTC is starting out a bit differently. Rather than announce the entire lineup of phones, it’s beginning with the interestingly-named HTC One. It’s just the HTC One — no S or X or V or any other monikers at all. It’s clear that the HTC One is the unadulterated representation of HTC’s vision for what the flagship of its smartphone lineup should be. HTC is different from other OEMs in that it only makes smartphones, and as a result the flagship clearly defines the rest of the product portfolio below it. With the One it looks as though HTC is making that kind of statement by literally letting it define the entire One brand.

Enough about the position and the strategy for HTC, these are mostly things that are interesting to enthusiasts and industry, but not really relevant to consumers or the review of a singular product. Let’s talk about the HTC One.

The HTC One Review

It is nearly impossible to begin to review the HTC One without some context, and I’ll begin our review of the HTC One (formerly the device known as codename M7) much the same way I did my impressions piece simply by stating that HTC is in an interesting position as a result of last year’s product cycle. If there’s one thing Anand has really driven home for me in my time writing for AnandTech, it’s that in the fast-paced mobile industry, a silicon vendor or OEM really only has to miss one product cycle in a very bad way to get into a very difficult position. The reality of things is that for HTC with this last product cycle there were products with solid industrial design and specs for the most part, but not the right wins with mobile operators in the United States, and not the right marketing message abroad. It’s easy to armchair the previous product cycle now that we have a year of perspective, but that’s the reality of things. HTC now needs a winner more than ever.

For 2013 HTC is starting out a bit differently. Rather than announce the entire lineup of phones, it’s beginning with the interestingly-named HTC One. It’s just the HTC One — no S or X or V or any other monikers at all. It’s clear that the HTC One is the unadulterated representation of HTC’s vision for what the flagship of its smartphone lineup should be. HTC is different from other OEMs in that it only makes smartphones, and as a result the flagship clearly defines the rest of the product portfolio below it. With the One it looks as though HTC is making that kind of statement by literally letting it define the entire One brand.

Enough about the position and the strategy for HTC, these are mostly things that are interesting to enthusiasts and industry, but not really relevant to consumers or the review of a singular product. Let’s talk about the HTC One.

The HTC One Review

It is nearly impossible to begin to review the HTC One without some context, and I’ll begin our review of the HTC One (formerly the device known as codename M7) much the same way I did my impressions piece simply by stating that HTC is in an interesting position as a result of last year’s product cycle. If there’s one thing Anand has really driven home for me in my time writing for AnandTech, it’s that in the fast-paced mobile industry, a silicon vendor or OEM really only has to miss one product cycle in a very bad way to get into a very difficult position. The reality of things is that for HTC with this last product cycle there were products with solid industrial design and specs for the most part, but not the right wins with mobile operators in the United States, and not the right marketing message abroad. It’s easy to armchair the previous product cycle now that we have a year of perspective, but that’s the reality of things. HTC now needs a winner more than ever.

For 2013 HTC is starting out a bit differently. Rather than announce the entire lineup of phones, it’s beginning with the interestingly-named HTC One. It’s just the HTC One — no S or X or V or any other monikers at all. It’s clear that the HTC One is the unadulterated representation of HTC’s vision for what the flagship of its smartphone lineup should be. HTC is different from other OEMs in that it only makes smartphones, and as a result the flagship clearly defines the rest of the product portfolio below it. With the One it looks as though HTC is making that kind of statement by literally letting it define the entire One brand.

Enough about the position and the strategy for HTC, these are mostly things that are interesting to enthusiasts and industry, but not really relevant to consumers or the review of a singular product. Let’s talk about the HTC One.

The HTC One Review

It is nearly impossible to begin to review the HTC One without some context, and I’ll begin our review of the HTC One (formerly the device known as codename M7) much the same way I did my impressions piece simply by stating that HTC is in an interesting position as a result of last year’s product cycle. If there’s one thing Anand has really driven home for me in my time writing for AnandTech, it’s that in the fast-paced mobile industry, a silicon vendor or OEM really only has to miss one product cycle in a very bad way to get into a very difficult position. The reality of things is that for HTC with this last product cycle there were products with solid industrial design and specs for the most part, but not the right wins with mobile operators in the United States, and not the right marketing message abroad. It’s easy to armchair the previous product cycle now that we have a year of perspective, but that’s the reality of things. HTC now needs a winner more than ever.

For 2013 HTC is starting out a bit differently. Rather than announce the entire lineup of phones, it’s beginning with the interestingly-named HTC One. It’s just the HTC One — no S or X or V or any other monikers at all. It’s clear that the HTC One is the unadulterated representation of HTC’s vision for what the flagship of its smartphone lineup should be. HTC is different from other OEMs in that it only makes smartphones, and as a result the flagship clearly defines the rest of the product portfolio below it. With the One it looks as though HTC is making that kind of statement by literally letting it define the entire One brand.

Enough about the position and the strategy for HTC, these are mostly things that are interesting to enthusiasts and industry, but not really relevant to consumers or the review of a singular product. Let’s talk about the HTC One.

The HTC One Review

It is nearly impossible to begin to review the HTC One without some context, and I’ll begin our review of the HTC One (formerly the device known as codename M7) much the same way I did my impressions piece simply by stating that HTC is in an interesting position as a result of last year’s product cycle. If there’s one thing Anand has really driven home for me in my time writing for AnandTech, it’s that in the fast-paced mobile industry, a silicon vendor or OEM really only has to miss one product cycle in a very bad way to get into a very difficult position. The reality of things is that for HTC with this last product cycle there were products with solid industrial design and specs for the most part, but not the right wins with mobile operators in the United States, and not the right marketing message abroad. It’s easy to armchair the previous product cycle now that we have a year of perspective, but that’s the reality of things. HTC now needs a winner more than ever.

For 2013 HTC is starting out a bit differently. Rather than announce the entire lineup of phones, it’s beginning with the interestingly-named HTC One. It’s just the HTC One — no S or X or V or any other monikers at all. It’s clear that the HTC One is the unadulterated representation of HTC’s vision for what the flagship of its smartphone lineup should be. HTC is different from other OEMs in that it only makes smartphones, and as a result the flagship clearly defines the rest of the product portfolio below it. With the One it looks as though HTC is making that kind of statement by literally letting it define the entire One brand.

Enough about the position and the strategy for HTC, these are mostly things that are interesting to enthusiasts and industry, but not really relevant to consumers or the review of a singular product. Let’s talk about the HTC One.