Tag Archives: Cooking Hacks

You Can Now Text the Butterball Turkey Help Hotline

The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line has been guiding helpless cooks to better turkeys for over 30 years. Now, if you don’t feel like calling, you can get your turkey questions answered via SMS text message for the first time ever.

For the novice cook, whole roasted turkey is a bit of a challenge. That’s what the experts at Butterball’s hotline are for. They can tell you everything from when you should defrost your bird to how you should cook it if you’re short on time. They’ve seen it all and heard it all when it comes to turkey questions, but now they can read it all too. If you’re need of some free turkey advice, you can text them at 1-800-Butterball until end of Thanksgiving night. You can learn more at the link below.

Update: Whoops! Look like we’ve shared this news already. Still, it’s a good reminder for this week! If you need turkey advice, you know who to text.

Turkey Talk-Line | Butterball via The Kitchn

Photo by Ruocaled.

J. Kenji López-Alt’s Method for Making a Perfectly Crispy Fried Egg

There are a lot of ways to cook up some great eggs, but a truly crispy fried egg is a whole different beast. Here’s chef J. Kenji López-Alt’s method for making a fried egg that perfectly balances crispy egg whites with a creamy yolk.

López-Alt of Serious Eats suggests if you want a fluffy, delicate egg, just poach it instead. If you want a real fried egg, López-Alt demonstrates his favorite technique in the video above from his YouTube channel. Add to two to three tablespoons of vegetable oil or olive oil to a non-stick skillet, and heat the oil on medium-high heat until it’s shimmering. Swirl the pan to distribute the oil, carefully add the egg, and season with salt and pepper. The egg white should be bubbling in the hot oil. Now tilt the pan so the oil collects at the bottom, then spoon the hot oil over the top of the egg whites. Remove the crispy egg from the pan with a wood spatula and serve. It will be cratered, bubbly, and actually taste fried.

http://lifehacker.com/im-j-kenji-lop…

How to Fry an Egg (the extra-crispy method) | YouTube via Serious Eats

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube