Tag Archives: Household

A Last-Minute Thanksgiving Guide to Everything You Forgot

Hosting Thanksgiving can be fun, but there’ll always be stress involved. Stress leads to forgetfulness, forgetfulness leads to anger, and anger leads to wine-fueled fights with your mother-in-law. Luckily, here are quick solutions to fix whatever Turkey Day gaps plague you, so you can avoid the trauma and drama.

You Forgot About the Appetizer

Sure, it would be great if you had remembered to buy endive and lovingly spoon little mounds of chevre into each tender leaf, but endive didn’t make it on the shopping list, and now you have nothing for your guests to nosh on while you wrap up the main meal. You could send your nephew to the store for a sad veggie tray, or you could use this opportunity to clean out your cabinet and fridge.

First, check your pantry for a can of beans, any beans, and whip up an easy dip. Besides beans, you’ll just need a little olive oil (a couple of tablespoons), some salt and pepper, and then one thing from each of the following categories:.

  • A Tablespoon of Something Creamy: Any kind of nut butter or creamy dairy product will work here, so reach for that last bit of sour cream, yogurt, cream cheese, or even that forgotten chunk of brie.
  • A Flavorful Pinch or Drizzle: Ginger and garlic are good options, but don’t be afraid to raid the fridge for flavorful one-offs, like miso, harissa, fish sauce, chilies, Parmesan, Worcestershire sauce, curry powder, or even tin fish like anchovies or sardines.
  • Some Acid: The juice and zest of half a lemon or lime should get you there, but you could also try a teaspoon or two of your favorite vinegar, or even some mustard, pickle brine, or juice from a jar of banana peppers.
  • A Little Bit of Something Sweet: Any kind of syrupy sweetness you have on hand will work, be it agave, honey, or maple, but there’s nothing wrong with using a little white table sugar or brown sugar.
  • Some Sort of Topping: You could grab whatever herbs you have leftover from other Thanksgiving recipes, or add some chopped nuts or potato chips for tasty texture.

Just blend it all together, top with your garnish, and serve in a bowl with what extra veggies or crunchy carbs you have on hand. (Send someone to the gas station for chips if you have to.)

Next, if you have any extra greens or vegetable tops lying around, go ahead and turn those into a pesto using a ratio of 1:2:2:8 (1 part nuts, 2 parts oil, 2 parts grating cheese, 8 parts leaves or herbs), plus garlic, lemon, and salt and pepper to taste. Carrot tops, random herbs, kale, spinach, and arugula can all be blitzed into this flavorful spread, and you can even use a mixture of all of the above.

Just take a couple cloves of garlic and give those a good chop using the pulse function on your food processor. Add two cups of green stuff, ½ cup of olive oil, ¼ cup of whatever nuts you have in your home, and pulse until smooth. Add a ½ cup of hard, grated cheese, squeeze in half a lemon, and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust as needed.

Finally, do not underestimate the power of ramen dip. Just grab a packet of the super salty flavor packet (any flavor except that weird cheese one) and stir into a tub of sour cream. (Top with scallions to dress it up.) Serve with chips and watch it get devoured.

Beyond dips, a lot can be accomplished with a pack of bacon. In fact, a whole slew of bacon-based appetizers can be assembled with only one or two other ingredients:

  • Bacon + Club Crackers + Parmesan: This is an old faithful recipe of mine by way of The Pioneer Woman. Simply top a buttery Club cracker with a teaspoon of grated parm, wrap half a piece of bacon around it, and repeat until you’ve gone through a whole sleeve. Bake at 250℉ for two hours.
  • Bacon + Brown Sugar: Toss bacon slices with brown sugar, lay them in a single layer on a parchment-covered baking sheet, top with another layer of parchment and place a baking sheet on top of the whole situation. Bake at 325℉ until crispy, about 20-35 minutes.
  • Bacon + Asparagus: Wrap a slice of bacon around a stalk of asparagus and bake at 400℉ for about half an hour.
  • Bacon + Pepper + Cream Cheese: Make a slit in a jalapeno or serrano (warning: these are spicy) and remove the insides. Stuff with cream cheese, wrap with bacon, and bake at 375℉ for about half an hour, until bacon is crispy.

That should take care of the snacks, or you can just do what my family does and buy a giant, plastic tub of aggressively orange cheese balls. That’s never a bad plan.

You Forgot to Buy Enough Booze

Maybe you don’t consider booze to be a necessary Thanksgiving supply, but I’d rather run out of pie than run out of wine. If you somehow underestimated the ethanolic needs of your guest list, don’t panic, you have a few options.

First, check out your liquor cabinet and see what kind of hard stuff you have lying around. You can make a quick punch out of almost anything, as long as you have something strong (liquor), something sweet (juice), and something sparkling (can be alcoholic or not). Feel free to play around with this to fit your palate, but I like a ratio of 1 bottle (750 mL) of booze:1 bottle sparkling wine:6 cups juice. If that’s a little strong for your taste, consider swapping out the champers for ginger ale or Sprite. Some combinations to get you going:

  • Grapefruit Gin Punch: Ruby Red grapefruit juice + Gin + Off-dry sparkling wine
  • Festive Cranberry Punch: Cranberry cocktail + Vodka + Prosecco
  • Rum Punch: Peach orange mango juice + Rum + Cava
  • Communion Punch: Welch’s grape juice + It doesn’t matter + maybe don’t actually do this
  • Beer Shandy Punch: Lemonade + Bourbon + Lager

If you don’t have time for even that, just send someone to go pick up a few cheap bottles of wine. Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Costco are all good resources with knowledgeable staff that will help you get the most bang for your buck. (Depending on which state you live in, you may not even need a Costco membership to buy wine there.)

You Forgot About the Non-Dinner Guest

Beyond the main meal, it’s likely you’ll have visiting friends and family pop by sometime over the holiday weekend for coffee or cocktails. To make sure you have something to serve besides leftovers, hit the freezer aisle and stock up on these winners.

You can never have too much pie and, if you’re running low on pumpkin, you can always grab a Marie Callender’s Pumpkin Pie ($6.49)—for that classic pumpkin pie experience—or an Edwards Pumpkin Crème Pie ($6.49)—for something a bit untraditional, but very tasty. Both were ranked as some of the best frozen options by The Kitchn, and both can be found at nearly any grocery store.

But frozen pie isn’t the only chilly superhero, if you want to serve something that is just as easy but a little more high-falutin’, grab some frozen puff pastry. Puff pastry is a dough that can do both (sweet and savory) so grab some sheets and make one or more of the following delectable bites:

  • Super Easy Plum Tart: Cut pastry into squares and prick with a fork. Fan out some pretty plum slices and sprinkle with sugar and freshly ground pepper. Bake for about half an hour at 425℉ until golden brown, and drizzle with honey before serving.
  • Make a “Croffle”: Place puff pastry in your waffle iron and crisp it up. Serve with Nutella and strawberries.
  • Savory Cheese Straws: Mix a cup of grated parmesan, a teaspoon of garlic powder, and a teaspoon of paprika together in a bowl. Cut puff pastry into strips and twist to form straws. Brush straws with egg wash and dredge through cheese mixture to coat and bake for about ten minutes at 425℉ until golden brown.

If the holiday has left you too tired to cook, just put a pot of coffee on and set out some sweet, seasonal liqueurs like peppermint mocha Kahlua, Frangelico, or Bailey’s. No one will be angry about that.

You Forgot to Make Name Cards or a Centerpiece

No one has ever said “You know, that was a nice dinner, and the turkey was superb, but I just can’t get over the lack of festive name cards and/or centerpiece.” No one has ever said that because no one gives a damn about tablescaping, which means you don’t have to worry about forgetting them. If, however, you want to give your guests a conversation jumping off point, consider printing out these festive Thanksgiving Mad Libs.

This will hopefully stimulate pleasant, non-political conversation at the dinner table. If that doesn’t work, scroll back up to section two of this article and pick a punch. (Communion punch is your nuclear option.)

Illustration by Sam Woolley. Photos by Didriks, Isaac Wedin, and Iris.

A Last-Minute Thanksgiving Guide to Everything You Forgot

Hosting Thanksgiving can be fun, but there’ll always be stress involved. Stress leads to forgetfulness, forgetfulness leads to anger, and anger leads to wine-fueled fights with your mother-in-law. Luckily, here are quick solutions to fix whatever Turkey Day gaps plague you, so you can avoid the trauma and drama.

You Forgot About the Appetizer

Sure, it would be great if you had remembered to buy endive and lovingly spoon little mounds of chevre into each tender leaf, but endive didn’t make it on the shopping list, and now you have nothing for your guests to nosh on while you wrap up the main meal. You could send your nephew to the store for a sad veggie tray, or you could use this opportunity to clean out your cabinet and fridge.

First, check your pantry for a can of beans, any beans, and whip up an easy dip. Besides beans, you’ll just need a little olive oil (a couple of tablespoons), some salt and pepper, and then one thing from each of the following categories:.

  • A Tablespoon of Something Creamy: Any kind of nut butter or creamy dairy product will work here, so reach for that last bit of sour cream, yogurt, cream cheese, or even that forgotten chunk of brie.
  • A Flavorful Pinch or Drizzle: Ginger and garlic are good options, but don’t be afraid to raid the fridge for flavorful one-offs, like miso, harissa, fish sauce, chilies, Parmesan, Worcestershire sauce, curry powder, or even tin fish like anchovies or sardines.
  • Some Acid: The juice and zest of half a lemon or lime should get you there, but you could also try a teaspoon or two of your favorite vinegar, or even some mustard, pickle brine, or juice from a jar of banana peppers.
  • A Little Bit of Something Sweet: Any kind of syrupy sweetness you have on hand will work, be it agave, honey, or maple, but there’s nothing wrong with using a little white table sugar or brown sugar.
  • Some Sort of Topping: You could grab whatever herbs you have leftover from other Thanksgiving recipes, or add some chopped nuts or potato chips for tasty texture.

Just blend it all together, top with your garnish, and serve in a bowl with what extra veggies or crunchy carbs you have on hand. (Send someone to the gas station for chips if you have to.)

Next, if you have any extra greens or vegetable tops lying around, go ahead and turn those into a pesto using a ratio of 1:2:2:8 (1 part nuts, 2 parts oil, 2 parts grating cheese, 8 parts leaves or herbs), plus garlic, lemon, and salt and pepper to taste. Carrot tops, random herbs, kale, spinach, and arugula can all be blitzed into this flavorful spread, and you can even use a mixture of all of the above.

Just take a couple cloves of garlic and give those a good chop using the pulse function on your food processor. Add two cups of green stuff, ½ cup of olive oil, ¼ cup of whatever nuts you have in your home, and pulse until smooth. Add a ½ cup of hard, grated cheese, squeeze in half a lemon, and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust as needed.

Finally, do not underestimate the power of ramen dip. Just grab a packet of the super salty flavor packet (any flavor except that weird cheese one) and stir into a tub of sour cream. (Top with scallions to dress it up.) Serve with chips and watch it get devoured.

Beyond dips, a lot can be accomplished with a pack of bacon. In fact, a whole slew of bacon-based appetizers can be assembled with only one or two other ingredients:

  • Bacon + Club Crackers + Parmesan: This is an old faithful recipe of mine by way of The Pioneer Woman. Simply top a buttery Club cracker with a teaspoon of grated parm, wrap half a piece of bacon around it, and repeat until you’ve gone through a whole sleeve. Bake at 250℉ for two hours.
  • Bacon + Brown Sugar: Toss bacon slices with brown sugar, lay them in a single layer on a parchment-covered baking sheet, top with another layer of parchment and place a baking sheet on top of the whole situation. Bake at 325℉ until crispy, about 20-35 minutes.
  • Bacon + Asparagus: Wrap a slice of bacon around a stalk of asparagus and bake at 400℉ for about half an hour.
  • Bacon + Pepper + Cream Cheese: Make a slit in a jalapeno or serrano (warning: these are spicy) and remove the insides. Stuff with cream cheese, wrap with bacon, and bake at 375℉ for about half an hour, until bacon is crispy.

That should take care of the snacks, or you can just do what my family does and buy a giant, plastic tub of aggressively orange cheese balls. That’s never a bad plan.

You Forgot to Buy Enough Booze

Maybe you don’t consider booze to be a necessary Thanksgiving supply, but I’d rather run out of pie than run out of wine. If you somehow underestimated the ethanolic needs of your guest list, don’t panic, you have a few options.

First, check out your liquor cabinet and see what kind of hard stuff you have lying around. You can make a quick punch out of almost anything, as long as you have something strong (liquor), something sweet (juice), and something sparkling (can be alcoholic or not). Feel free to play around with this to fit your palate, but I like a ratio of 1 bottle (750 mL) of booze:1 bottle sparkling wine:6 cups juice. If that’s a little strong for your taste, consider swapping out the champers for ginger ale or Sprite. Some combinations to get you going:

  • Grapefruit Gin Punch: Ruby Red grapefruit juice + Gin + Off-dry sparkling wine
  • Festive Cranberry Punch: Cranberry cocktail + Vodka + Prosecco
  • Rum Punch: Peach orange mango juice + Rum + Cava
  • Communion Punch: Welch’s grape juice + It doesn’t matter + maybe don’t actually do this
  • Beer Shandy Punch: Lemonade + Bourbon + Lager

If you don’t have time for even that, just send someone to go pick up a few cheap bottles of wine. Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Costco are all good resources with knowledgeable staff that will help you get the most bang for your buck. (Depending on which state you live in, you may not even need a Costco membership to buy wine there.)

You Forgot About the Non-Dinner Guest

Beyond the main meal, it’s likely you’ll have visiting friends and family pop by sometime over the holiday weekend for coffee or cocktails. To make sure you have something to serve besides leftovers, hit the freezer aisle and stock up on these winners.

You can never have too much pie and, if you’re running low on pumpkin, you can always grab a Marie Callender’s Pumpkin Pie ($6.49)—for that classic pumpkin pie experience—or an Edwards Pumpkin Crème Pie ($6.49)—for something a bit untraditional, but very tasty. Both were ranked as some of the best frozen options by The Kitchn, and both can be found at nearly any grocery store.

But frozen pie isn’t the only chilly superhero, if you want to serve something that is just as easy but a little more high-falutin’, grab some frozen puff pastry. Puff pastry is a dough that can do both (sweet and savory) so grab some sheets and make one or more of the following delectable bites:

  • Super Easy Plum Tart: Cut pastry into squares and prick with a fork. Fan out some pretty plum slices and sprinkle with sugar and freshly ground pepper. Bake for about half an hour at 425℉ until golden brown, and drizzle with honey before serving.
  • Make a “Croffle”: Place puff pastry in your waffle iron and crisp it up. Serve with Nutella and strawberries.
  • Savory Cheese Straws: Mix a cup of grated parmesan, a teaspoon of garlic powder, and a teaspoon of paprika together in a bowl. Cut puff pastry into strips and twist to form straws. Brush straws with egg wash and dredge through cheese mixture to coat and bake for about ten minutes at 425℉ until golden brown.

If the holiday has left you too tired to cook, just put a pot of coffee on and set out some sweet, seasonal liqueurs like peppermint mocha Kahlua, Frangelico, or Bailey’s. No one will be angry about that.

You Forgot to Make Name Cards or a Centerpiece

No one has ever said “You know, that was a nice dinner, and the turkey was superb, but I just can’t get over the lack of festive name cards and/or centerpiece.” No one has ever said that because no one gives a damn about tablescaping, which means you don’t have to worry about forgetting them. If, however, you want to give your guests a conversation jumping off point, consider printing out these festive Thanksgiving Mad Libs.

This will hopefully stimulate pleasant, non-political conversation at the dinner table. If that doesn’t work, scroll back up to section two of this article and pick a punch. (Communion punch is your nuclear option.)

Illustration by Sam Woolley. Photos by Didriks, Isaac Wedin, and Iris.

Four Tips From Ex-Burglars On How to Protect Your Home and Belongings

Nobody knows what deters burglars more than burglars. Here’s what former thieves recommend you do to safeguard your home from break-ins.

Kyle Iboshi, investigative reporter at KGW News in Portland, Oregon, surveyed 86 inmates currently serving time for burglary about how they broke in and what homeowners can do to deter other burglars. It came down to four big deterrents anyone can do:

  1. Keep your property visible with good lighting, and keep your bushes and trees trimmed.
  2. Always leave a TV or radio on when you leave, and keep at least one light on. This was one of the most commonly mentioned deterrents in the survey.
  3. Keep an extra car visible in the driveway if possible. Almost every ex-burglar surveyed said that seeing a car in the driveway kept them away.
  4. Get to know your neighbors so they can report any suspicious activity to you.

Other tips include getting a dog—a big one, not a small one—posting a security system sign (which doesn’t always work), and getting a visible security camera. You can get more great tips at the link below.

We asked 86 burglars how they broke into homes | KGW Portland

Photo by Anne Jacko.

Remove Berry Stains From Clothing With a Boiling Water Flush

Remove Berry Stains From Clothing With a Boiling Water Flush

A handful of berries is a great snack, but one dropped berry or thoughtless wipe of your juice-covered hands can leave your clothing stained. If you act quickly, a little bowling water can keep the red stain from setting in your favorite garments, even whites.

A good stain remover will take out a stubborn stain once it sets, but it’s better to address the stain as soon as it happens, and Jo First at The Kitchn recommends a boiling water flush. Fill a teakettle with water and get it boiling on the stovetop. Blot the stain with a clean cloth to try and absorb some of the juice, but don’t rub or press too hard. Now turn the garment inside out, pull it taut over a large bowl, and pour the boiling water on the stain. Doing it inside out makes the stain go out of the fabric, not deeper into it. If you can’t hold the garment taut by yourself, use a rubber band around the edge of the bowl. Once the stain is out, hang the garment to dry in the sunlight. After a few hours, it should be good as new.

http://lifehacker.com/remove-berry-s…

The Best Way to Remove Berry Stains | The Kitchn

Photo by saphoto co.

Make These Affordable, Classy DIY Poster Frames

Make These Affordable, Classy DIY Poster Frames

Making your own simple, good-looking poster frames is easy, and showcases your art without costing a ton. You just need a few supplies, some common tools, and a little time to create these classy wooden frames for your favorite posters.

The basic process is simple enough, and you can customize these frames with the wood stain or paint of your choice. Besides a screwdriver, drill, and measuring tape, you’ll need:

  • Mounting tape
  • 4 pieces of 2” lattice
  • 4 Brass washers, bolts and #10 machine screws
  • 2 small screws
  • Pencil
  • String or twine

If you want to frame only the top of your poster, you only need two pieces of lattice and two sets of washers, bolts and screws. Cut the lattice, or have it cut at the hardware store, so that it is two inches wider on each side than your poster. Drill a hole one inch in from the each end, make sure they match up since you’ll be attaching them together. Center your poster on the lattices and attach with the mounting tape. Attach two pieces of lattice together with a washer, bolt, and #10 machine screw on each side of the art. You’ll have one for the top of the poster and one for the bottom. Add the two small screws to the top part of the frame, make sure they’re not too long or they’ll damage the poster inside. Tie string or twine to the screws and hang on the wall.

Obviously this isn’t good for posters that you want to protect completely with a frame that covers the whole body and face of the poster, but if you’re looking for something easy and affordable, it’s a good fit.

DIY Chart and Poster Frame | Oleander and Palm

Image from Jeran McConnel.

What to Look for When Shopping for a Digital Kitchen Scale

A digital kitchen scale is an essential tool for anybody that likes to cook or bake. They provide accuracy for making your recipes more reliable and easy to cook. If you’re in the market for one, these are the qualities you should look for.

In this video from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, chef Lisa McManus reviews the best kitchen scales out there (you can find a complete list here). Based on their results, a good digital kitchen scale should be:

  • Accurate: If it’s not accurate, it’s useless. Fortunately, every scale they tested with lab-calibrated weights scored well.
  • Easy to use: You should be able to switch from grams to ounces quickly, and the controls should be intuitive and easy to access.
  • Legible: The digital display should be large, use big digits, have sharp color contrast, and a backlight option. Also, a large bowl shouldn’t completely obscure the screen.
  • Durable: You should be able to plop your scale on the counter without it being damaged.
  • Easy to clean: The scale should have a removable platform for easy cleanup, and the scale shouldn’t have nooks and crannies that easily trap food and water residue.

So what was their top pick? They went with the OXO Good Grips Stainless Steel Food Scale with Pull-Out Display which runs for $50, followed by the Ozeri Pronto Digital Multifunction Kitchen and Food Scale as a best buy option for about $12.

http://lifehacker.com/5840209/why-yo…

Equipment Review: Best Digital Kitchen Scales | YouTube

Why Clothes Always Shrink When You Wash Them

Everyone knows what it’s like to do the laundry and then wind up having to re-break in a pair of pants, or squeeze into a shirt or skirt the first time after it comes out in the wash—but why does this happen, and can it be prevented? This video from DNews explains.

http://lifehacker.com/top-10-clothin…

For those who can’t watch, the answer’s pretty simple—natural fibers like cotton, wool, and silk are, in their natural state, pretty curly and tangled. In order to be made into clothing, those fibers need to be stretched out, but given an opportunity to return to their natural, tangled state, they will. All of the mechanical energy that comes from washing, machining, and drying clothes gives them the energy and the opportunity to slip those bonds and release the potential energy they get when they’re drawn out and straightened to make the clothes that we wear. Some natural fibers do this more than others (wool being one of the biggest offenders), but they all do—and synthetics, for example, don’t.

The reason for that is that they don’t get the energy required (either through heat in the dryer or being bumped around in the washer) to deviate from their stretched and stitched forms. So as a solution, synthetic fabrics are often used to “fill the gaps” in clothing that’s otherwise mostly natural fibers. That’s why you see a lot of clothing that’s a cotton/polyester blend, or cotton/rayon dress clothes, for example. The goal is to keep them from shrinking as much as possible when they’re washed, and it usually works pretty well. Another solution is to spray down those natural fibers with anti-shrinking agents that keep the closed from relaxing when they’re washed.

You can see more about this whole process in the video above (and the link below), along with the three types of shrinkage involved with clothing (relaxing, felting, and consolidation,) when they’re most likely to occur, and which causes the most headache for clothes buyers like you and I.

Why Do Clothes Shrink When You Wash Them? | DNews

The Best Way to Load Your Dishwasher Is Buried In Its Manual

The Best Way to Load Your Dishwasher Is Buried In Its Manual

People fight over the best way to load the dishwasher. Forks with tines up or down, pots on the top or bottom—luckily, it’s all meaningless. Your specific model probably has a “right way,” and it’s buried in the back of its owner’s manual.

http://lifehacker.com/5833663/how-to…

Checking the user manual seems like a no-brainer, but with something as easy to use (or that was pre-installed when you moved in) as a dishwasher, you may have never seen it, much less read it yourself. For example, Kenmore’s manual shows you how to use the angled sides on the top rack to prevent those pools of standing water on the tops of your coffee mugs, and the best way to space out dishes on the bottom rack to make sure each one gets properly washed. If you no longer have your dishwasher manual, you can always Google the brand and model number to find a digital version, someone’s definitely scanned it, or the official one may still be available as a PDF from the manufacturer’s site.

The Correct Way to Load Dishes for Every Major Dishwasher Brand, As Shown In Their Manuals | The Kitchn

Image from Matthew Paul Argall.

The Best Flowers to Grow for Homemade Bouquets

The Best Flowers to Grow for Homemade Bouquets

Making your own bouquets is an inexpensive way to enjoy beautiful flowers at home or give them as a gift, but you don’t have to visit the florist to have them. Here are the flowers that will grow fast enough in your garden for you to enjoy beautiful, fresh, colorful bouquets all spring and summer.

Whether you have space for just a few pots or a whole garden plot you can dedicate, these flowers will give you choice in color and shape for your homemade bouquets.

By planting these varieties now, you can get bouquet ready blooms faster than just planting annuals or other blooming flowers. They come in lots of color varieties, grow quickly, and in general are easy enough to care for. Check out the link below for details on each flower including which zones they thrive in and how to best care for them.

15 Fast-Growing Flowers for a Cutting Garden | This Old House

Image from nhoulihan.

A Quick Way to Chill Beer In a Hotel Room with No Fridge

A Quick Way to Chill Beer In a Hotel Room with No Fridge

Reader Kyle sent in this method to chill beer if you’re on the road, would like a frosty drink, and of course, your hotel room doesn’t have a fridge. Just line up your bottles on the air conditioner unit, fire it up full blast, and give it about fifteen minutes. Surprisingly, that’s all it takes.

Of course, this only works in hotel rooms that have those old school window-mounted air conditioners, but if you’re traveling on a budget anywhere with AC, you’ve probably slept somewhere with one of these in your room before. Kyle writes that instead of heading to the ice machine every hour to try and chill a couple of beers, try this:

Central A/C need not apply here; if your hotel is still rolling with the classic jet engine sounding corner A/C unit, you’re in luck! Simply position your beer bottles carefully along the bottom lip of the vent, and maintain caution as you add each one, as too much vibration can send a previous bottle to the floor. If this occurs, definitely denote which bottle took the plunge, so it has enough time to depressurize as it awaits consumption.

Crank the Temperature and Fan to their highest settings, and within about 15 minutes you have beer cold enough to enjoy. Leaving it on this setting for too long can compromise the taste, so ease off of the Temperature setting after about a half hour to a mid-level range. Continue to adjust the temperature as necessary to suit your taste.

You may find this beer consuming experience a bit chilly, but if you packed your parka, scarf, gloves, beanie, and long underwear, you can drink in comfort! Either way, if you drink enough, eventually you can’t even tell how cold the room actually is.

There are a lot of variables required for this one to work right (the AC needs a lip, for example, and should be angled so you can rest the beer on it while it’s cooling), so if you’re staying somewhere this isn’t a good fit for you, you can always try some of our other favorite methods, or plug up the sink in your hotel room, head to the ice machine, and chill your beer in an ice-filled sink.

http://lifehacker.com/whats-the-fast…

Thanks to Kyle for sending in the tip!