Tag Archives: Ipad

The Best Ways to Use Google Maps With Apple’s CarPlay

The world might feel like a mess right now, depending on your technological, financial, or political interests, but there’s one thing I think we can all get universally excited about. Google Maps has finally come to CarPlay.

Read more…

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter

There are dozens of Twitter clients for the iPhone, but the official Twitter app and the third-party Tweetbot are two of the most popular. One’s free, the other’s pretty expensive at $9.99. Let’s dig into the main differences between the two, and see if the difference in experience is worth the difference in cost.

The Contenders

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Tweetbot (left) orders your timeline, y’know, by time whereas Twitter (right) does whatever it wants

Because of the way Twitter works, developing a Twitter app is a pain. It’s expensive for developers because Twitter charges them for keys to access the site, which means developers tend to pass that charge over to you, and then revoke access when you get too popular. Subsequently, most good Twitter apps tend to be on the pricey side, Tweetbot included. Let’s start with a quick look at both apps:

  • Twitter (Free): When it first launched, the official Twitter app was a bit of a joke, but over the years it’s improved quite a bit. That said, it’s basically just a mobile version of the web site, which means it’s built more for the everyday user than for power users who use all of Twitter’s features, or manage multiple accounts. It’s straight-forward to use and doesn’t feature any bells and whistles.
  • Tweetbot ($9.99): Tweetbot has been our favorite Twitter client for iPhone for a very long time, but $10 is a steep price to pay for most users. Tweetbot isn’t really made for most users though. It’s made for the type of person who spends the bulk of their day on Twitter, whether it for work or out of a deep-seated obsession with the social network. Tweetbot has a good amount of customization options for the interface, alongside a handful of ways to get a better Twitter experience by tweaking the content of your feed.

Assuming that the $10 price tag on Tweetbot isn’t enough to turn you away outright, picking between the two really depends on how you use Twitter.

http://lifehacker.com/5809798/the-be…

Tweetbot Has Better Customization

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Don’t like the tabs on the bottom? Tweetbot (left) lets you change them up

The official Twitter app is about as vanilla as an experience as you can get. Open it up and you’ll find an interface similar to the web site, with tabs on the bottom for your notifications, moments, DMs, and your profile tab. Functionality in the app is the same as the site as well. You can’t alter any of this. You can’t change the tabs, the colors, or even adjust the font size. With the Twitter app, what you see is what you get.

Conversely, Tweetbot has a variety of customization options. For example, the bottom tab bar has two buttons on the right that you can swap out for whatever function you want: activity (which includes mentions, replies, favorites, and new follower information), search, profile, likes, mute filters, or lists. If you use lists to tame your Twitter feed, having access to them in the tab bar makes your life easier. The official Twitter app tucks those lists behind several taps. If you’re using Tweetbot on an iPad or a iPhone 6 Plus, you also get support for columns in landscape mode, which lets you see two tabs side-by-side. Tweetbot also allows you to chose between a couple fonts, swap between username or full name for your timeline, alter the image size in your feed, and even customize the avatars. There’s a dark mode included if you prefer to do your tweeting late at night in a dark room.

Tweetbot also has extremely customizable notifications, so you can tweak them so you only get the notifications you want. Tweetbot has options for links too, allowing you to open links in Tweetbot, Chrome, or Safari, and even includes a reader view that strips away the visual styling of an article.

In the end, if you want an app you can customize, Tweetbot’s the one you’re looking for. The official Twitter app doesn’t allow you to change anything.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-clean-u…

Tweetbot’s Mute Filters and Lack of Ads Make Power User’s Days Better

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Tweetbot’s mute filters let you get rid of any part of Twitter you don’t want to see

Twitter is a noisy place. People tweet dozens of times a day, publications don’t seem to ever stop, and there’s always a chance for spoilers if you’re anticipating any type of media at all. Tweetbot has ways around this.

Tweetbot has a powerful set of mute filters. You can mute keywords, phrases, users, or hashtags. When you do so, any tweet that contains those things will not show up in your feed. This is great during sports playoffs when you’re not a fan, election seasons, or if you’re avoiding spoilers for something. If you do mute something, Tweetbot’s also smart enough to still show you replies that might mention those things, so you’re not totally cut off from the world. The downside is that these mute filters don’t carry over to the web version of Twitter, so it really only works inside the Tweetbot ecosystem (which includes the $10 Mac app). If you only use the Tweetbot iPhone app, it’s great, but if you’re also using the web version on your desktop computer, it’s a bit annoying.

Plus, like pretty much all third-party Twitter clients, you won’t see ads in Tweetbot. Considering how often those annoying sponsored posts seem to pop up, it’s a nice little addition if you’re not a fan of advertisements.

http://lifehacker.com/5887230/how-to…

Twitter Keeps You on the Cutting Edge

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
While Tweetbot lets you take a close look at what’s happening in your feed, Twitter likes to show you a more global view

The one area where the official Twitter dominates Tweetbot is in support for new features. The folks behind Twitter love to introduce new little features all the time, whether that’s fun stuff like polls or weird features like Moments. If you’re using the official Twitter app, you will almost always see an update in the app to support these new features immediately.

Tweetbot doesn’t do this at all. Heck, Tweetbot still doesn’t support polls. For whatever reason, many of the cutting edge features that Twitter decides to roll out don’t end up working on third-party clients. Of course, that’s also a feature of Tweetbot if you like a simpler Twitter experience as a whole.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-take-yo…

The Verdict: Tweetbot’s the Better App, but Twitter Is Free, Still Does Enough for Most People

Let’s be honest here: the general population who just glances at Twitter a couple times a day doesn’t need a $10 Twitter app. If you only manage one account, don’t mind seeing a bunch of extra garbage like ads and obnoxious hashtags, and it doesn’t bother you when Twitter adds some half-baked new idea to the app every week, then the official Twitter app is all you need.

If you spend a lot of time on Twitter during the day, then Tweetbot’s the best app for making that experience better. The mute function alone is worth the price of admission for some people, but the customizable toolbar and activity menu make it much easier to manage large scale accounts.

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter

There are dozens of Twitter clients for the iPhone, but the official Twitter app and the third-party Tweetbot are two of the most popular. One’s free, the other’s pretty expensive at $9.99. Let’s dig into the main differences between the two, and see if the difference in experience is worth the difference in cost.

The Contenders

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Tweetbot (left) orders your timeline, y’know, by time whereas Twitter (right) does whatever it wants

Because of the way Twitter works, developing a Twitter app is a pain. It’s expensive for developers because Twitter charges them for keys to access the site, which means developers tend to pass that charge over to you, and then revoke access when you get too popular. Subsequently, most good Twitter apps tend to be on the pricey side, Tweetbot included. Let’s start with a quick look at both apps:

  • Twitter (Free): When it first launched, the official Twitter app was a bit of a joke, but over the years it’s improved quite a bit. That said, it’s basically just a mobile version of the web site, which means it’s built more for the everyday user than for power users who use all of Twitter’s features, or manage multiple accounts. It’s straight-forward to use and doesn’t feature any bells and whistles.
  • Tweetbot ($9.99): Tweetbot has been our favorite Twitter client for iPhone for a very long time, but $10 is a steep price to pay for most users. Tweetbot isn’t really made for most users though. It’s made for the type of person who spends the bulk of their day on Twitter, whether it for work or out of a deep-seated obsession with the social network. Tweetbot has a good amount of customization options for the interface, alongside a handful of ways to get a better Twitter experience by tweaking the content of your feed.

Assuming that the $10 price tag on Tweetbot isn’t enough to turn you away outright, picking between the two really depends on how you use Twitter.

http://lifehacker.com/5809798/the-be…

Tweetbot Has Better Customization

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Don’t like the tabs on the bottom? Tweetbot (left) lets you change them up

The official Twitter app is about as vanilla as an experience as you can get. Open it up and you’ll find an interface similar to the web site, with tabs on the bottom for your notifications, moments, DMs, and your profile tab. Functionality in the app is the same as the site as well. You can’t alter any of this. You can’t change the tabs, the colors, or even adjust the font size. With the Twitter app, what you see is what you get.

Conversely, Tweetbot has a variety of customization options. For example, the bottom tab bar has two buttons on the right that you can swap out for whatever function you want: activity (which includes mentions, replies, favorites, and new follower information), search, profile, likes, mute filters, or lists. If you use lists to tame your Twitter feed, having access to them in the tab bar makes your life easier. The official Twitter app tucks those lists behind several taps. If you’re using Tweetbot on an iPad or a iPhone 6 Plus, you also get support for columns in landscape mode, which lets you see two tabs side-by-side. Tweetbot also allows you to chose between a couple fonts, swap between username or full name for your timeline, alter the image size in your feed, and even customize the avatars. There’s a dark mode included if you prefer to do your tweeting late at night in a dark room.

Tweetbot also has extremely customizable notifications, so you can tweak them so you only get the notifications you want. Tweetbot has options for links too, allowing you to open links in Tweetbot, Chrome, or Safari, and even includes a reader view that strips away the visual styling of an article.

In the end, if you want an app you can customize, Tweetbot’s the one you’re looking for. The official Twitter app doesn’t allow you to change anything.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-clean-u…

Tweetbot’s Mute Filters and Lack of Ads Make Power User’s Days Better

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
Tweetbot’s mute filters let you get rid of any part of Twitter you don’t want to see

Twitter is a noisy place. People tweet dozens of times a day, publications don’t seem to ever stop, and there’s always a chance for spoilers if you’re anticipating any type of media at all. Tweetbot has ways around this.

Tweetbot has a powerful set of mute filters. You can mute keywords, phrases, users, or hashtags. When you do so, any tweet that contains those things will not show up in your feed. This is great during sports playoffs when you’re not a fan, election seasons, or if you’re avoiding spoilers for something. If you do mute something, Tweetbot’s also smart enough to still show you replies that might mention those things, so you’re not totally cut off from the world. The downside is that these mute filters don’t carry over to the web version of Twitter, so it really only works inside the Tweetbot ecosystem (which includes the $10 Mac app). If you only use the Tweetbot iPhone app, it’s great, but if you’re also using the web version on your desktop computer, it’s a bit annoying.

Plus, like pretty much all third-party Twitter clients, you won’t see ads in Tweetbot. Considering how often those annoying sponsored posts seem to pop up, it’s a nice little addition if you’re not a fan of advertisements.

http://lifehacker.com/5887230/how-to…

Twitter Keeps You on the Cutting Edge

iPhone Twitter App Showdown: Tweetbot vs. Twitter
While Tweetbot lets you take a close look at what’s happening in your feed, Twitter likes to show you a more global view

The one area where the official Twitter dominates Tweetbot is in support for new features. The folks behind Twitter love to introduce new little features all the time, whether that’s fun stuff like polls or weird features like Moments. If you’re using the official Twitter app, you will almost always see an update in the app to support these new features immediately.

Tweetbot doesn’t do this at all. Heck, Tweetbot still doesn’t support polls. For whatever reason, many of the cutting edge features that Twitter decides to roll out don’t end up working on third-party clients. Of course, that’s also a feature of Tweetbot if you like a simpler Twitter experience as a whole.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-take-yo…

The Verdict: Tweetbot’s the Better App, but Twitter Is Free, Still Does Enough for Most People

Let’s be honest here: the general population who just glances at Twitter a couple times a day doesn’t need a $10 Twitter app. If you only manage one account, don’t mind seeing a bunch of extra garbage like ads and obnoxious hashtags, and it doesn’t bother you when Twitter adds some half-baked new idea to the app every week, then the official Twitter app is all you need.

If you spend a lot of time on Twitter during the day, then Tweetbot’s the best app for making that experience better. The mute function alone is worth the price of admission for some people, but the customizable toolbar and activity menu make it much easier to manage large scale accounts.

The Best System Monitor for iPhone

The Best System Monitor for iPhone

At a glance, system monitors might not seem as useful on your iPhone as they are on a desktop computer, but they can pack in a lot of good data. This includes detailed battery life breakdowns, storage space, data speeds, and more. For the average user, our favorite system monitor for the iPhone is Omnistat.

Omnistat

Platform: iPhone (and iPad)
Price: $1.99
Download Page

Features

  • Customizable Notification Center widgets let you decide what data is shown and where it shows up
  • Universal app for iPad and iPhone. Also includes Apple Watch support
  • Shows activity and stats for: device name, device model, current OS version, current OS build number, device uptime, Wi-Fi details, mobile carrier data usage, download and upload speed, storage information, CPU usage, battery details, and more
  • Choose when your data plan resets so you can always track mobile data usage accurately
  • Estimates remaining battery time

Where It Excels

Omnistat’s biggest strength are the Notification Center widgets. A system monitor is something you want quick access to, and Notification Center widgets are a clever way of doing that. With Omnistat, you can customize which stats appear as widgets, and any time you want to take a glance at them, just pull down on the Notification Center. Omnistat gives each activity its own widget, so you can customize the layout in Notification Center easily.

Beyond that, Omnistat provides the details most people want. This includes battery life, including estimations for remaining talk, text, and data time. You can also easily track Wi-Fi and cell data usage. For data usage, Omnistat supports creating an automated reset date for cell data so it’s always in time with your data plan. If you’re running on a 16GB iPhone or you’re just always against the wall with remaining space, the storage widget is extremely helpful for keeping your remaining storage space in check. Omnistat has plenty of other widgets, from network details to device CPU usage, so it should have the data you need access to the most.

Where It Falls Short

Omnistat excels because of the inclusion of Notification Center widgets. However, Omnistat is not the most extensive system monitor available. While it does track most activities the average user wants, it’s missing a lot of data for anyone looking for a more granular approach. Likewise, Omnistat gives a lot of overview data, but you can’t focus on more specific information, like what hours you tend to use more data, a history of Wi-Fi networks, or anything else like that.

The Competition

Omnistat is great for the average person looking to glance at a few broad bits of information, but if you want to dig really deep into data, it’s not the app you want. Thankfully, the system monitor space is pretty packed full of solid apps.

For those who love massive amounts of system details, System Monitor Ultimate (Free) is worth a look. System Monitor Ultimate displays a ton of data about your CPU, GPU, network, active connections, and plenty more. System Monitor Ultimate is not exactly the best looking system monitor around nor is it packed with features, but it’s free and displays just about every bit of data you can track on an iPhone. There’s no Notification Center widget support, but if widgets aren’t your thing, System Monitor Ultimate is the app you want.

If you’re looking for the same amount of data as System Monitor Ultimate with more interactive features, then System Status ($2.99) fits the bill. On top of monitoring a number of data points, network information, battery, and memory, System Status also shows you file statistics, detailed page statistics, tracks three minutes of background activity, and allows you to export all those charts over email. If you love to look at and save activity monitor data, but don’t care about the widgets, System Status does the job.

Finally, Omnistat isn’t the only system monitor with widgets, Usage Widget (Free/99¢) and SnapStats (Free) both include Notification Center widgets alongside basic system monitors. Unlike Omnistat, both apps display all the stats in a single widget, so you can’t move them around or customize them quite as much. That’s a preference thing though, so if you don’t mind all your data being jammed into one spot, both apps are worth a look.


Lifehacker’s App Directory is a new and growing directory of recommendations for the best applications and tools in a number of given categories.

The Best Calendar App for iPhone

The Best Calendar App for iPhone

You have tons of options for calendars on iPhone, many that are free, but when it comes to the best, we recommend Fantastical 2, even if you have to shell out $5 to use it.

Fantastical 2

Platform: iPhone (and iPad)
Price: $4.99
Download Page

Features

  • Compatible with Google Calendar, iCloud, and Exchange
  • Quickly add new events with natural language (“Lunch with Alan tomorrow”)
  • Notification Center support
  • Map view for event locations
  • Week view in landscape mode
  • Integration with Facebook events
  • Widget support
  • Quick Actions on iPhone 6s
  • Light and dark themes
  • Reminders integration with notifications

Where It Excels

A lot of things are great about Fantastical 2, but what separates it from the pack the most comes down to its design. Fantastical 2 is incredibly easy to use, fast, and it’s powerful enough for most people. As a basic calendar, you can view your events on a calendar and they’re visualized in a readable and easy to understand way. You can add new events without a lot of taps and the natural language entry means you can type out an event just like you’d say it out loud.

Fantastical also offers up just enough options for viewing your calendar to make it useful for a variety of people. You can check out a list view in portrait mode that offers both a week ticker and a month calendar at the top, or flip your phone to landscape view to see a more detailed look at your week. These three views make it pretty easy to glance at your calendar to get a gist of your schedule at any given moment.

Fantastical 2 is updated consistently with new features, but more importantly it’s always kept up to date for new versions of iOS and any new features that might come along with a new iPhone (like Quick Actions on the iPhone 6s) or in the operating system itself (like widget support). Finally, Fantastical 2 is just as reliable as Apple’s built-in options, which, when it boils down to it, is one of the most important aspects of a calendar. Syncing always works, crashes are very rare, and notifications always happen when they’re supposed to.

Where It Falls Short

The most obvious downside of Fantastical is the $5 price tag. While paying for the app means you’ll get continued support and you don’t have to worry as much about the app getting acquired by another company (which are oddly common in calendar apps), not everyone wants to shell out cash for a calendar app. We do cover some free options below though.

Beyond that, Fantastical is missing some of the social or third-party integrations that you’ll find in other calendar apps. While it does support Facebook events, that’s pretty much it. You won’t find detailed views of your weather, Evernote reminders, or anything else here. On one end, that means Fantastical is a solid calendar app on its own, but on another, it means you can’t auto populate your calendar using other services.

The Competition

You have a lot of good competition in the calendar space on the iPhone, so if you don’t feel like shelling out the $5 for Fantastical, don’t worry.

Let’s start with Sunrise Calendar (Free). Sunrise Calendar was our previous pick for the best calendar on iPhone. It’s free, supports the big three calendar services, integrates weather forecasts, and links up with tons of other services. The problem is the app’s now dead after Microsoft acquired the team who made it. A lot of the Sunrise features are now being integrated into Microsoft’s Outlook app, but the iOS app for Sunrise will never get updated again.

Any.Do Cal (Free) is another decent free option, but it hasn’t seen an update in a year. Cal is a little more fun and playful then Fantastical, integrating a lot of images into its design as well as working well with the Any.do to-do list app. As a calendar, it does everything it needs to, but doesn’t go too far out of its way to do anything new.

Finally, as far as free options go, it’s worth mentioning Google Calendar (Free). If you’re deep into Google’s ecosystem, the Google Calendar app is great. It shows you events from Gmail, to-dos, and even gives you little added features like flight information. The problem, of course, is that most of the usefulness relies on other Google services, so if you’re not using any of them, Google Calendar is far less useful.

In the paid space, the biggest competitor to Fantastical is Calendars 5 ($6.99). Calendars 5 is a very capable app that includes natural language input, a task manager, and a variety of view options to glance at your calendar. The week view in Calendars 5 is good, better than Fantastical’s in some ways, but the rest of the interface is a bit lacking. Calendars 5 is also a universal app, so if you use your iPad a lot, it’s great to just purchase one app instead of two.

Week Calendar ($1.99) is another app that once sat in our App Directory. It’s packed with a ton of features, including multiple views, your choice of navigation app integration, templates, widgets, and more. It’s also quite possibly the ugliest option available, but that hasn’t prevented it from being one of the most popular calendar apps out there.


Lifehacker’s App Directory is a new and growing directory of recommendations for the best applications and tools in a number of given categories.

Adjust Audio Balance in iOS Under the Accessibility Options

Adjust Audio Balance in iOS Under the Accessibility Options

If I’m doing anything where I need to hear the world around me, I tend to just keep one earbud in when I’m listening to podcasts or music. This obviously screws with the sound, but Macworld reminds us where the option to adjust balance is tucked away in iOS.

This option is in such an odd place that I forgot it was even an option. To adjust the volume balance, head to Settings > General > Accessibility. Here, you can adjust the left/right balance or set the audio to mono. Obviously this is meant for people with hearing troubles in one of their ears, but it’s a useful setting to know regardless of your hearing capability.

How to adjust left/right audio balance in iOS | Macworld

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

http://lifehacker.com/5924093/five-b…

  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

http://lifehacker.com/wunderlist-for…

Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

http://lifehacker.com/any-do-adds-a-…

What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

http://lifehacker.com/should-i-use-t…

The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

http://lifehacker.com/the-coolest-ex…

However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

http://lifehacker.com/5924093/five-b…

  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

http://lifehacker.com/wunderlist-for…

Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

http://lifehacker.com/any-do-adds-a-…

What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

http://lifehacker.com/should-i-use-t…

The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

http://lifehacker.com/the-coolest-ex…

However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

http://lifehacker.com/5924093/five-b…

  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

http://lifehacker.com/wunderlist-for…

Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

http://lifehacker.com/any-do-adds-a-…

What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

http://lifehacker.com/should-i-use-t…

The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

http://lifehacker.com/the-coolest-ex…

However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.

How Much Money You’ll Make When You Recycle Through Apple’s Renew Program

How Much Money You’ll Make When You Recycle Through Apple’s Renew Program

Apple recently unveiled the Apple Renew program, which pays you in Apple gift cards and good Earth vibes to recycle old iPhones, iPads, Macs, and other devices. Here’s what you can expect to get back if you send in your used stuff.

Recycling with Apple Renew is simple. Just head here, and provide some information about the model of device you want to recycle, its storage, its condition, and a few other things, then the site will give you a return value. To simplify things, here’s what you can expect to get back, organized by device.

http://lifehacker.com/everything-app…

What You’ll Get for Your Old iPhone or iPad

Provided your device is still in decent working condition, here’s what you can expect to get back for recycling an old iPhone (Brightstar is Apple’s recycling partner), regardless of device color or carrier. Keep in mind, these are all estimates and the actual value you get back may change once Apple gets your device and inspects it.

  • iPhone 4: $50 Apple gift card for 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB models
  • iPhone 4s: $50 Apple gift card for 8GB, 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPhone 5: $100 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPhone 5c: $100 Apple gift card for 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB models
  • iPhone 5s: $150 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPhone 6: $250 Apple gift card for 16GB, 64GB, and 128GB models
  • iPhone 6 Plus: $300 Apple gift card for 16GB, 64GB, and 128GB models

Here’s what you’ll get for recycling an old iPad (all colors, Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi+Cellular models):

  • iPad Mini: $65 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPad Mini 2: $115 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB models
  • iPad Mini 3: $155 Apple gift card for 16GB, 64GB, and 128GB models
  • iPad 2: $60 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPad 3: $80 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models
  • iPad 4: $125 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB models
  • iPad Air: $150 Apple gift card for 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB models
  • iPad Air 2: $225 Apple gift card for 16GB, 64GB, and 128GB models

It’s important to note that your return will be lower if your device does not power on properly, has a severely damaged screen, has a bent or broken metal enclosure, has been damaged by water, or if any of the buttons aren’t working. Also, the site doesn’t mention anything about engraved models, so it’s possible that may affect your device’s value. If your device is really messed up, they may not offer you anything at all. They do, however, offer environmentally safe disposal for free no matter what.

Apple’s Renew program sees your old iPhones and iPads as a sum of the materials inside. It doesn’t really matter what color it is or how much memory it has. This is a fair deal for the folks that purchased base models, but not so great for those who forked over a few hundred extra dollars for more memory. You could probably get a little more for your devices if you tried to sell them (and get cash instead of Apple gift cards), but it isn’t a bad deal overall if you’re looking to upgrade within the Apple lineup. Apple will also take your old iPods and other gadgets as well, but there’s no gift card incentive. If you want to safely dispose of your iPod, they’ll do it for free, but all you’ll get is the satisfaction in properly disposing old electronics (which is still worth plenty to some). If you take your old non-Shuffle iPod into an Apple Store, however, you can get 10% off the purchase of a new iPod.

http://lifehacker.com/5981335/the-co…

What You’ll Get for Macs and Windows PCs

You probably assumed that Apple would take back old iMacs, Mac Minis, and Macbooks, but you can also recycle Windows laptops and desktops. As long as your Mac or Windows PC was made after 2007, it’s eligible for Apple Renew.

There are a lot of different Mac models and combinations out there, so you’re better off looking for your own specific machine. To give you a ballpark estimate, however, you can expect an Apple gift card anywhere from $35 for an older MacBook Core 2 Duo (2.0GHz) to $500 for a MacBook Air Core i7 (2.2GHz) to $720 for 13" MacBook Pro Core i7 (3.1 GHz). For desktops, you can get anywhere from a $230 gift card for a Mac Mini Core i7 (3.0 GHz) to $800 for a 27" iMac Core i7 (4.0 GHz) with 5K Retina display to $1500 for a Mac Pro (3.7 GHz) Ivy Bridge Quad-Core. If you’re a dedicated Mac user, and you’re not up for selling your old machine, recycling your computer with Apple seems like a pretty good way to cover some of the cost of your upgrade.

For Windows PC recycling, however, you’re not going to get much, even if the machine works just fine. A Windows desktop PC with an Intel Core i7 (3.0-3.49GHz) processor, for example, will only net you a $75 gift card, and that’s if you include a power cord, working keyboard and mouse, and if it has an SSD. The processor alone is worth nearly three times that much (assuming it’s still in good condition). Recycling your Windows machine with Apple is only worth it if it’s broken, you don’t want to try and sell its parts, and you’re just looking for an earth-friendly way to dispose of it.