Tag Archives: Job Interviews

What a Hiring Manager Is Actually Thinking During Your Interview

What a Hiring Manager Is Actually Thinking During Your Interview

Whether you’ve interviewed over one million times or can count on one hand how many times you’ve been face-to-face with a hiring manager, the process is always stressful. Not only are you trying your hardest to present the very best version of yourself, you’re also attempting to read your audience and gather as much information as you can about the role, the company culture, and the organization itself. No pressure.

Ask any manager what it’s like to make a hiring decision and she’ll most likely tell you that it’s no easy task for her, either. Making the right choice can be difficult–especially when she’s choosing from a group of well-qualified applicants. So how can you tip the scales in your favor? In addition to coming to each and every interview well-prepared, try putting yourself in the shoes of the person sitting across from you.

Last time I checked, no one has yet figured out how to read minds, but we can get pretty close by addressing the five common thoughts almost every hiring manager probably has during your interview.

1. Can I Manage This Person?

A supervisor isn’t going to hire someone that he doesn’t believe he can work with. Managers come in all shapes and sizes–some are hands-off and expect their employees to do what they need to do with little or no supervision. Others like to receive daily updates, religiously review timecards, and schedule regular check-in meetings with their staff. If you like to get regular feedback and crave facetime with your supervisor, a laid-back person may not be the best fit for you. Conversely, if you’re an independent operator who relishes autonomy, a hands-on supervisor probably isn’t a great match for your work style.

So when your potential future boss begins thinking about your match as manager and employee during your interview, what can you do? To start, you can show that you are a great listener by making eye contact, taking notes, asking questions, and giving thoughtful answers. Mention that you pride yourself on taking accountability for your workplace contributions, appreciate constructive feedback, and are excited about continuing to grow your skill set. Demonstrating a willingness to own your work, listen, and learn will definitely score a few points in your favor.

At some point during the meeting, you should also get an opportunity to pose a few questions. Try asking your potential supervisor how she would describe her management style. If her answer is in line with your preferences, say, “That sounds great! I find that I work really well with managers who are hands on and provide lots of detailed feedback,” or “That is very much in line with my work style. Having a certain degree of autonomy to get my work done helps me to maximize my productivity.”

If you discover that your future boss’ leadership style isn’t one that works for you, it may be time to evaluate whether or not this is the job for you.

http://lifehacker.com/what-hiring-ma…

2. Does This Person Truly Understand This Role?

Interviewers want to be sure that you not only know what you’d be getting yourself into, but that you’ve done your homework. Be sure that you’ve thoroughly reviewed the job description before your interview, and make an effort to relate your existing experience back to the responsibilities you would have in the role you’re being considered for.

Most hiring managers typically start off with a couple of simple questions like, “Can you tell me about yourself?” and “Why are you interested in this position?” These are perfect opportunities to demonstrate your understanding of the role. Say something that indicates you get what the job entails and why your background is a solid match, “I have four years of production management experience and specialize in vendor relations. I know vendor management would be an important component of this role, which is why I am particularly excited about this opportunity,” or “I am passionate about social media and am specifically targeting opportunities that will allow me to grow my expertise in this area. I know one of my primary responsibilities in this role would be writing and scheduling tweets for the company’s Twitter account, and I have some great ideas for how I can help you to grow your followers.”

Another great way to show that you understand what you’re interviewing for is to ask questions about the role once you’ve demonstrated that you’ve done more than just read the job description. Saying, “What kind of traffic goals do you have for Twitter, and what resources do you think will help you reach that goal?”

Whenever you can go beyond the job listing to show an impressive grasp of the role’s responsibilities, you should do so. It’s a waste of both your and the recruiter’s time to only rehash what’s involved in the position.

3. Is This Person Actually Excited About Working Here?

Similar to having an in-depth understanding of the potential opportunity, it’s important to show that you are genuinely excited about the organization as a whole. Of course, not every interview is going to be with your dream company, but try your best to find something that is interesting to you.

Was the company recently named one of the best places to work in your area? Is the department you’d be working in creating innovative new products? Was the CEO recently mentioned in a well-respected publication? Spend some time researching and reading any recent, relevant articles that you can reference during the interview.

Along with wondering if you’re truly excited about the opportunity, an interviewer will want to gauge whether you’re a good fit. During the meeting, take the opportunity to ask about the team, their work style, and the company culture. Not only will this show that you are genuinely engrossed in learning about the organization as a whole and not just focused on the position you’re applying for, but it will demonstrate that you, too, care about being the right person for the job.

http://lifehacker.com/what-the-peopl…

4. Will This Person Make Me Look Good?

To a certain degree, an employee’s performance is a reflection on her supervisor. Your potential future boss wants to be sure that if she takes a day off or can’t make it to a meeting, you’ll still be on top of your game. If you do superb work and present yourself well, she looks good too. If you’re goofing off while the boss is on vacation or don’t proofread that super important email, the person she reports to probably won’t be too happy with either of you.

What is the best way to assure your future manager that you are totally trustworthy? Find out what she values in a team member. Try asking, “What traits are most important to you in an employee?” or “What are your expectations of the person who steps into this role?” If her answers line up with your work style, be sure to tell her that. For example, if your interviewer says she values clear communication above all else, say, “I couldn’t agree more. I am always striving to keep my team and my manager looped in on my progress, workload, and availability. I’ve found that maintaining open lines of communication goes a long way toward optimizing productivity and teamwork.”

At the end of your interview, when your future supervisor asks if you have anything to add, try leading with, “I really appreciate all of the information you’ve shared with me about what it’s like to work here and your expectations for this role. I think that my experience and work style would be a great fit for this team. I want you to know that as an employee, you can expect me to be proactive, responsive, and deadline-oriented.”

This type of response shows that you’ve been paying attention and is a good indication of your professional demeanor.

5. When’s Lunch?

Interviewing can be grueling for the people on the other side of the desk, too—especially if the hiring manager is meeting with multiple candidates back-to-back. This doesn’t happen during every interview, but sometimes an interviewer’s mind will wander. He might be hungry, he might be tired, or he might be distracted by a looming deadline, but regardless of the reason for the distraction, it does happen.

Obviously you can’t control the external factors that may be affecting your interviewer’s state of mind, but you can work on becoming the most interesting and engaging interviewee you can be. Recruit a friend to help you practice some commonly asked interview questions and ask for feedback on your body language, eye contact, tone of voice, and the content of your answers. Are you looking down when you talk or speaking in a dull, monotone voice? If you don’t seem interested in your own answers, you can’t expect anyone else to be either.

Another key trick to remember? Keep your answers short and sweet. A lot of people tend to ramble when they’re nervous and that can make this meeting feel like it’s dragging on and on. Try crafting exceptional responses using this simple formula: answer + example + result. For example, in response to, “How do you manage your time?” say, “I manage my time by prioritizing my responsibilities. For example, if I’m working on two projects simultaneously, I will always tackle the one that is more complex or due sooner first. This has helped me to be very effective in my past roles. In fact, I regularly get compliments on my ability to juggle a large workload without missing deadlines.”

Keep in mind that the goal here isn’t to simply tell your interviewer what you think she wants to hear. The goal is to proactively address questions she’s probably asking herself during your meeting. The purpose of an interview isn’t to land a job, it’s for you and your potential future employer to assess whether or not you’re a fit for each other. Coming well-prepared and playing an active role in your interview will serve this purpose while making you look like an all-star in the process.

5 Things a Hiring Manager’s Probably Thinking During Your Interview (and What to Do About It) | The Muse


Jaclyn Westlake is a job search enthusiast, LinkedIn addict, and certified senior human resources professional. She’s also a resume writer, career advisor, and the founder of The Job Hop. When she’s not dishing out career insights or writing amazing resumes, you can probably find her wandering around a book store, binging on the latest Netflix release, or kayaking with her adorable dachshund, Indiana Jones. Top image by iluistrator (Shutterstock).

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

When you’re looking for a new job, there’s a lot that can go wrong, from formatting your resume improperly to being tripped up by questions during the job interview. Watch out for these 10 common mistakes job applicants often make.

10. Not Starting Your Job Search Soon Enough

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

The biggest mistake is not looking for a new job soon enough. You should keep looking for a new job, even if you have one you like and perhaps don’t want to quit. Start your job search at least 18 months or so after starting your new job. Gone are the days of pensions for decades of employee loyalty or people staying at one job for more than a few years. Whatever your job, stay on your toes so you’ll be ready for your next job search.

9. Responding to Want Ads and Job Boards

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Online job boards can help you find the keywords for your resume and criteria companies are looking for. But for landing a specific job? They’re not usually so helpful, and are more often a waste of time. Be careful, because sometimes they’re not even legitimate job ads. You’re better off reaching out to your network—perhaps using LinkedIn—than spending a ton of time applying to online job listings.

8. Sending Unsolicited Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

If you’ve found a company you’re interested in working for and the contact information for someone who works there, that’s a great thing. But don’t just send your resume out of the blue (“Hey can you find me a job at your company I’d be a fit for?”). It’s one of the most common job search mistakes you can make. Ask your contact for advice before applying for a position normally there—if they offer to pass along a recommendation or your resume, that’s great. But let them decide to do it or not.

7. Not Keeping Your Job Search a Secret

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

In some cases, it might make sense to tell your boss you’re thinking of leaving—if your manager might be willing to change the things that are bothering you. But this depends highly on your boss, and in most cases, you should keep your job search under wraps. You can make your search private even if the company checks up on employees. Make sure you change this LinkedIn setting before you start updating your profile for the job hunt.

6. Not Cleaning Up Your Online Profiles

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Most people are aware that potential employers check candidates’ social media profiles, and yet many applicants still get rejected because of their poor online profiles. Sometimes it’s not over inappropriate content, but other things like poor communication skills or sharing information about previous employers. Spruce up your social network profiles, and make sure there’s nothing posted there that might put you in a bad light.

5. Sending Generic Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

It might seem like too much work, but you should tailor your resume for the job and your profession. Remember that both hiring managers and computerized screening systems look to see if your resume matches the position. Use the keywords from the job listing in your resume. A service like Resunate can help or just create resume templates to avoid sending out the same resume everywhere. Know the key words that are best for your field.

4. Showing Up to the Interview Unprepared

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

You’ve got to ace the interview to get the job, but according to hiring managers, too many job applicants aren’t prepared for things like describing situations where they’ve succeeded or failed—or don’t even look interested. Watch your body language, come prepared with questions for the company, and be ready to respond to the most common job interview questions. Here’s a job interview sheet that can help you prep. Also, get to the interview about 15 minutes early, not too early.

3. Not Researching the Company

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

This was a biggie when I asked hiring managers what they wished job applicants knew. Know the company’s narrative before you apply: their pain points, values, and industry trends. This will help you figure out if the company is a cultural fit for you, and it will also show your interviewer that you really care about the job and your potential future at the company.

2. Not Using Your Network

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

“It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” rings true to a great extent. Your contacts—and the people they know—are your best source for a new job, since the majority of jobs aren’t even advertised. In some industries, such as computer security and management consulting, networking matters even a great deal more. It’s awkward to reach out to people when you’re looking for a job, but someone in your network could be a great referral. You could use a trade show to network your way into a new job, the LinkedIn “back door” method, or just, you know, pick up the phone or send an email. If you haven’t talked to a reference in a long time, just be transparent about why you’re reaching out.

1. Underestimating Your Worth

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Even when the job market is tough, you shouldn’t automatically accept any job offer (unless, perhaps, you’re in dire need of a job right now). The only way to make sure a job offer is fair is to know how much your skills and experience are worth. Know what salary to ask for in a new job by using a salary search site like PayScale or Glassdoor. That way you can avoid lowball offers and negotiate your salary. You should have a minimum salary you’d be willing to accept, and aim for getting a higher salary and/or better benefits than you’re currently getting. The biggest salary negotiation mistake is not doing it, so don’t be afraid to negotiate. Remember that you have and will be earning your income.

Illustration by Fruzsina Kuhári.


Lifehacker’s Weekend Roundup gathers our best guides, explainers, and other posts on a certain subject so you can tackle big projects with ease. For more, check out ourWeekend Roundup and Top 10 tags.

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

When you’re looking for a new job, there’s a lot that can go wrong, from formatting your resume improperly to being tripped up by questions during the job interview. Watch out for these 10 common mistakes job applicants often make.

10. Not Starting Your Job Search Soon Enough

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

The biggest mistake is not looking for a new job soon enough. You should keep looking for a new job, even if you have one you like and perhaps don’t want to quit. Start your job search at least 18 months or so after starting your new job. Gone are the days of pensions for decades of employee loyalty or people staying at one job for more than a few years. Whatever your job, stay on your toes so you’ll be ready for your next job search.

9. Responding to Want Ads and Job Boards

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Online job boards can help you find the keywords for your resume and criteria companies are looking for. But for landing a specific job? They’re not usually so helpful, and are more often a waste of time. Be careful, because sometimes they’re not even legitimate job ads. You’re better off reaching out to your network—perhaps using LinkedIn—than spending a ton of time applying to online job listings.

8. Sending Unsolicited Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

If you’ve found a company you’re interested in working for and the contact information for someone who works there, that’s a great thing. But don’t just send your resume out of the blue (“Hey can you find me a job at your company I’d be a fit for?”). It’s one of the most common job search mistakes you can make. Ask your contact for advice before applying for a position normally there—if they offer to pass along a recommendation or your resume, that’s great. But let them decide to do it or not.

7. Not Keeping Your Job Search a Secret

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

In some cases, it might make sense to tell your boss you’re thinking of leaving—if your manager might be willing to change the things that are bothering you. But this depends highly on your boss, and in most cases, you should keep your job search under wraps. You can make your search private even if the company checks up on employees. Make sure you change this LinkedIn setting before you start updating your profile for the job hunt.

6. Not Cleaning Up Your Online Profiles

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Most people are aware that potential employers check candidates’ social media profiles, and yet many applicants still get rejected because of their poor online profiles. Sometimes it’s not over inappropriate content, but other things like poor communication skills or sharing information about previous employers. Spruce up your social network profiles, and make sure there’s nothing posted there that might put you in a bad light.

5. Sending Generic Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

It might seem like too much work, but you should tailor your resume for the job and your profession. Remember that both hiring managers and computerized screening systems look to see if your resume matches the position. Use the keywords from the job listing in your resume. A service like Resunate can help or just create resume templates to avoid sending out the same resume everywhere. Know the key words that are best for your field.

4. Showing Up to the Interview Unprepared

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

You’ve got to ace the interview to get the job, but according to hiring managers, too many job applicants aren’t prepared for things like describing situations where they’ve succeeded or failed—or don’t even look interested. Watch your body language, come prepared with questions for the company, and be ready to respond to the most common job interview questions. Here’s a job interview sheet that can help you prep. Also, get to the interview about 15 minutes early, not too early.

3. Not Researching the Company

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

This was a biggie when I asked hiring managers what they wished job applicants knew. Know the company’s narrative before you apply: their pain points, values, and industry trends. This will help you figure out if the company is a cultural fit for you, and it will also show your interviewer that you really care about the job and your potential future at the company.

2. Not Using Your Network

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

“It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” rings true to a great extent. Your contacts—and the people they know—are your best source for a new job, since the majority of jobs aren’t even advertised. In some industries, such as computer security and management consulting, networking matters even a great deal more. It’s awkward to reach out to people when you’re looking for a job, but someone in your network could be a great referral. You could use a trade show to network your way into a new job, the LinkedIn “back door” method, or just, you know, pick up the phone or send an email. If you haven’t talked to a reference in a long time, just be transparent about why you’re reaching out.

1. Underestimating Your Worth

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Even when the job market is tough, you shouldn’t automatically accept any job offer (unless, perhaps, you’re in dire need of a job right now). The only way to make sure a job offer is fair is to know how much your skills and experience are worth. Know what salary to ask for in a new job by using a salary search site like PayScale or Glassdoor. That way you can avoid lowball offers and negotiate your salary. You should have a minimum salary you’d be willing to accept, and aim for getting a higher salary and/or better benefits than you’re currently getting. The biggest salary negotiation mistake is not doing it, so don’t be afraid to negotiate. Remember that you have and will be earning your income.

Illustration by Fruzsina Kuhári.


Lifehacker’s Weekend Roundup gathers our best guides, explainers, and other posts on a certain subject so you can tackle big projects with ease. For more, check out ourWeekend Roundup and Top 10 tags.

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

When you’re looking for a new job, there’s a lot that can go wrong, from formatting your resume improperly to being tripped up by questions during the job interview. Watch out for these 10 common mistakes job applicants often make.

10. Not Starting Your Job Search Soon Enough

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

The biggest mistake is not looking for a new job soon enough. You should keep looking for a new job, even if you have one you like and perhaps don’t want to quit. Start your job search at least 18 months or so after starting your new job. Gone are the days of pensions for decades of employee loyalty or people staying at one job for more than a few years. Whatever your job, stay on your toes so you’ll be ready for your next job search.

9. Responding to Want Ads and Job Boards

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Online job boards can help you find the keywords for your resume and criteria companies are looking for. But for landing a specific job? They’re not usually so helpful, and are more often a waste of time. Be careful, because sometimes they’re not even legitimate job ads. You’re better off reaching out to your network—perhaps using LinkedIn—than spending a ton of time applying to online job listings.

8. Sending Unsolicited Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

If you’ve found a company you’re interested in working for and the contact information for someone who works there, that’s a great thing. But don’t just send your resume out of the blue (“Hey can you find me a job at your company I’d be a fit for?”). It’s one of the most common job search mistakes you can make. Ask your contact for advice before applying for a position normally there—if they offer to pass along a recommendation or your resume, that’s great. But let them decide to do it or not.

7. Not Keeping Your Job Search a Secret

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

In some cases, it might make sense to tell your boss you’re thinking of leaving—if your manager might be willing to change the things that are bothering you. But this depends highly on your boss, and in most cases, you should keep your job search under wraps. You can make your search private even if the company checks up on employees. Make sure you change this LinkedIn setting before you start updating your profile for the job hunt.

6. Not Cleaning Up Your Online Profiles

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Most people are aware that potential employers check candidates’ social media profiles, and yet many applicants still get rejected because of their poor online profiles. Sometimes it’s not over inappropriate content, but other things like poor communication skills or sharing information about previous employers. Spruce up your social network profiles, and make sure there’s nothing posted there that might put you in a bad light.

5. Sending Generic Resumes

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

It might seem like too much work, but you should tailor your resume for the job and your profession. Remember that both hiring managers and computerized screening systems look to see if your resume matches the position. Use the keywords from the job listing in your resume. A service like Resunate can help or just create resume templates to avoid sending out the same resume everywhere. Know the key words that are best for your field.

4. Showing Up to the Interview Unprepared

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

You’ve got to ace the interview to get the job, but according to hiring managers, too many job applicants aren’t prepared for things like describing situations where they’ve succeeded or failed—or don’t even look interested. Watch your body language, come prepared with questions for the company, and be ready to respond to the most common job interview questions. Here’s a job interview sheet that can help you prep. Also, get to the interview about 15 minutes early, not too early.

3. Not Researching the Company

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

This was a biggie when I asked hiring managers what they wished job applicants knew. Know the company’s narrative before you apply: their pain points, values, and industry trends. This will help you figure out if the company is a cultural fit for you, and it will also show your interviewer that you really care about the job and your potential future at the company.

2. Not Using Your Network

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

“It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” rings true to a great extent. Your contacts—and the people they know—are your best source for a new job, since the majority of jobs aren’t even advertised. In some industries, such as computer security and management consulting, networking matters even a great deal more. It’s awkward to reach out to people when you’re looking for a job, but someone in your network could be a great referral. You could use a trade show to network your way into a new job, the LinkedIn “back door” method, or just, you know, pick up the phone or send an email. If you haven’t talked to a reference in a long time, just be transparent about why you’re reaching out.

1. Underestimating Your Worth

Top 10 Mistakes You Might Be Making with Your Job Search

Even when the job market is tough, you shouldn’t automatically accept any job offer (unless, perhaps, you’re in dire need of a job right now). The only way to make sure a job offer is fair is to know how much your skills and experience are worth. Know what salary to ask for in a new job by using a salary search site like PayScale or Glassdoor. That way you can avoid lowball offers and negotiate your salary. You should have a minimum salary you’d be willing to accept, and aim for getting a higher salary and/or better benefits than you’re currently getting. The biggest salary negotiation mistake is not doing it, so don’t be afraid to negotiate. Remember that you have and will be earning your income.

Illustration by Fruzsina Kuhári.


Lifehacker’s Weekend Roundup gathers our best guides, explainers, and other posts on a certain subject so you can tackle big projects with ease. For more, check out ourWeekend Roundup and Top 10 tags.

Boost Your Confidence Before a Phone Interview by Dressing Your Best

Boost Your Confidence Before a Phone Interview by Dressing Your Best

Interviewing for a job over the phone can be just as stressful as interviewing in person. You can prepare yourself mentally and get in a good mindset by dressing up like they’ll be right there in the room with you.

Career coach and recruiter Peggy McKee at Careerealism suggests you dress up like you’re going to have the interview in person anyway. Put on your favorite suit, wear some nice shoes, and do whatever else you would normally do if you were trying to look your best. Even though they won’t see you, you’ll know that you look your best and you’ll feel more confident because of it. Dressing the part also puts you in a professional mindset. Instead of thinking about lounging around or the house chores you need to work on, your mind will be focused on work things and the skills you have. The secret to having a great phone interview is treating it like an in-person interview.

http://lifehacker.com/5877626/prepar…

3 Phone Interview Tips to Build Your Confidence | Careerealism

Photo by John Blyberg.

The Companies With the Best Job Interview Processes

The Companies With the Best Job Interview Processes

If you’ve ever been through a stressful interview, you know what it’s like to wish you’d been warned in advance what you were up against. Well, Glassdoor’s latest report may not include your company, but it does rank the ones the best interview processes across nearly 50 different industries.

To build the report, Glassdoor compiled the reviews and interview feedback they got from users along with the average company ratings for each company and the collective sentiment of each industry – they studied thousands of companies, pulled out some highlight points about the interview process of each, and ranked those companies by percentage of candidate feedback about the interview process that was positive, neutral, and negative.

Just as an example, here are their top ten tech companies:

  1. Intel Corporation: 71% positive interview experience
  2. Cerner: 71% positive interview experience
  3. IBM: 67% positive interview experience
  4. Hewlett-Packard: 67% positive interview experience
  5. Apple: 65% positive interview experience
  6. VMware: 65% positive interview experience
  7. Epic Systems Corporation: 64% positive interview experience
  8. Cisco Systems: 64% positive interview experience
  9. eBay: 64% positive interview experience
  10. Microsoft: 64% positive interview experience

Of course, these are just the top ten tech companies—the survey looked at industries that include tech, but also span everything from airlines (United Airlines took the top spot) and aerospace (Lockheed Martin earned high marks here) to healthcare (CVS Health Services earned high praise) and social assistance (head on down to your local YMCA for a great interview.)

For the leaders in every industry, check out the full report at the link below.

Glassdoor’s Candidates’ Choice Awards 2015: Winners Announced | Glassdoor Blog

Photo by Motohiko Tokuriki.

Mentally Prepare for Job Interviews with This Power-Priming Exercise

Mentally Prepare for Job Interviews with This Power-Priming Exercise

If there’s one thing you want going into a job interview, it’s confidence in yourself. In just a few minutes, this exercise will help you feel confident by simply drawing on past experiences.

At some point in your life, you probably felt capable, strong, and powerful. No matter how long ago it was, Emily Guy Birken at MoneyNing suggests you sit down to write about it in detail. It doesn’t matter what the situation was, either. It could have been a time your co-workers listened to you, a time you ran farther than you ever had before, or even a time you won a game. Whatever it was, write about it as vividly as you can. You’ll remind yourself that you’re capable of doing well, and that confidence can come from almost anything. Transfer that feeling of power to yourself right before your interview and you’ll feel more prepared give everything you’ve got. It may not guarantee you the job, but you’ll at least know you were the best version of you possible.

3 Scientific Ways to Psych Yourself Up for a Job Interview | MoneyNing

Photo by Vancouver Film School.

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

In business and in life, copying someone’s behavior can build a rapport. In an interview setting, that might work against you if the interviewer is annoyed.

The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology explains how an interviewer’s mood can change the mood of the applicant:

interviewer tone had a significant indirect effect on applicant performance through its influence on applicant tone. Nonconscious behavioral mimicry of negative behaviors occurs in social interactions, is not always associated with positive outcomes

This study was small—only 54 participants—but the results are a little common sense, though you might forget in the heat of the moment. The key is to be conscious that the interviewer may be changing your tone or behavior. If they aren’t "into" the interview, don’t let that change your attitude. Stay upbeat and positive even if the person on the other side of the table has a case of the Mondays.

The tongue-tied chameleon: The role of nonconscious mimicry in the behavioral confirmation process | Journal of Experimental Social Psychology via Science of us

Photo by the half-blood prince.

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

In business and in life, copying someone’s behavior can build a rapport. In an interview setting, that might work against you if the interviewer is annoyed.

The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology explains how an interviewer’s mood can change the mood of the applicant:

interviewer tone had a significant indirect effect on applicant performance through its influence on applicant tone. Nonconscious behavioral mimicry of negative behaviors occurs in social interactions, is not always associated with positive outcomes

This study was small—only 54 participants—but the results are a little common sense, though you might forget in the heat of the moment. The key is to be conscious that the interviewer may be changing your tone or behavior. If they aren’t "into" the interview, don’t let that change your attitude. Stay upbeat and positive even if the person on the other side of the table has a case of the Mondays.

The tongue-tied chameleon: The role of nonconscious mimicry in the behavioral confirmation process | Journal of Experimental Social Psychology via Science of us

Photo by the half-blood prince.

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

If Your Interview Has a Negative Attitude, Don’t Copy it

In business and in life, copying someone’s behavior can build a rapport. In an interview setting, that might work against you if the interviewer is annoyed.

The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology explains how an interviewer’s mood can change the mood of the applicant:

interviewer tone had a significant indirect effect on applicant performance through its influence on applicant tone. Nonconscious behavioral mimicry of negative behaviors occurs in social interactions, is not always associated with positive outcomes

This study was small—only 54 participants—but the results are a little common sense, though you might forget in the heat of the moment. The key is to be conscious that the interviewer may be changing your tone or behavior. If they aren’t "into" the interview, don’t let that change your attitude. Stay upbeat and positive even if the person on the other side of the table has a case of the Mondays.

The tongue-tied chameleon: The role of nonconscious mimicry in the behavioral confirmation process | Journal of Experimental Social Psychology via Science of us

Photo by the half-blood prince.