Tag Archives: Journaling

Get Over a Breakup With “Redemptive Narrative” Journaling

Get Over a Breakup With "Redemptive Narrative" Journaling

There are a lot of great reasons to keep a journal, and getting over a breakup might be one of them. The key is using your words to reframe your suffering into a positive, or at least meaningful, experience.

http://lifehacker.com/why-you-should…

A recent study, conducted by Erica B. Slotter and Deborah E. Ward at Villanova University, and published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, suggests that writing about your experience in a certain way can lessen the emotional toll that breakups take. Using a method called “redemptive narratives,” you can turn negative life events into a positive turning point in your life. For example, you can write about how you learned something important about yourself, or that you now have a better understanding of a relationship’s dynamics. Additionally, you can use hindsight to your advantage to reshape memories and decide how they positively affected your personal story. It may not work as well in the long-term, but time heals most wounds, and it can help you work through the darkest days of heartbreak early on.

Finding the Silver Lining | Journal of Social and Personal Relationships via Business Insider

Photo by lukestehr.

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

When it comes to pocket-sized notebooks, two companies stand above the rest: Moleskine and Field Notes. Both are incredibly popular and work great for what they are, but choosing between the two is difficult. We’re here to help you make that choice.

The Contenders

While you have thousands of options for paper notebooks, Moleskine and Field Notes are two of our favorites. Both companies make fantastic notebooks, but they’re made differently, have different paper selections, and have drastically different covers. For the sake of consistency, we’re going to stick to pocket-sized notebooks for this comparison, since that’s the only size Field Notes makes. Moleskine has a much broader selection of sizes though, so if you’re looking for something larger, that’s the brand you’ll want to go with. With that out of the way, let’s take a close look at the two contenders.

  • Moleskine: Love them or hate them, Moleskine notebooks are ubiquitous. There’s a cult following around the company that’s at least partially due to the their trademark hard covers, the variety of notebook sizes the company offers, and a small selection of different types of paper. Moleskine notebooks are available everywhere and their pocket-sized options come in a variety of types specific to individual needs. Their pocket-sized notebooks (3 1/2" x 5 1/2") come packed with 192 pages and retail starting at $12. Moleskines are designed in Italy and manufactured in China.
  • Field Notes: If Moleskine are the Evernote of notebook brands, Field Notes are the plain text equivalent. With only one exception, they stick to a single size (3 1/2" x 5 1/2"), though they offer a variety of different colors and types of paper. Picking the right notebook for you is as simple as finding the paper style you prefer. Field Notes are sold in a three-pack of 48-page notebooks as opposed to one single, larger notebook. Pretty much all editions of the Field Notes three-packs are $10. Field Notes are designed and made in the U.S.

You can walk into just about any department store or bookshop and walk out with a notebook, but these two are so popular they have each have their own followings, and for good reason. Let’s take this comparison a little deeper.

http://lifehacker.com/five-best-pape…

Moleskine Has More Covers but Both Are Durable

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Comparing the covers of Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks is a little disingenuous because of the number of options Moleskine offers compared to the one basic Field Notes cover, but it’s necessary nonetheless.

Moleskine notebooks come with three basic cover options, soft, hard, and cardboard. Let’s take a closer look:

  • Hard cover: Moleskine’s hard cover notebooks are their bread and butter. The hard cover notebook is what most people think of when they think of Moleskine. The cover is cardboard bound, features a cloth bookmark, an elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket in the back.
  • Soft cover: Moleskine’s soft cover notebooks are basically the same as their hardcover, but feature a much more flexible cover. Like the hard cover, they come with a bookmark, elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket.
  • Cardboard: If there’s a direct analog between Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks, it’s Moleskine’s Cahier line. The stitching in these notebooks goes across the spine in a way that looks like it’s done by hand. The covers are a lighter cardboard than the hard covers. This notebook does not have the trademark elastic enclosure of other Moleskine notebooks. This line of notebooks comes in three different sizes, but the 64-page pocket version is the closest to Field Notes. Like Field Notes, these come in three packs that retail for $10.

In my experience, all three of Moleskine’s notebook styles are durable and can take a pretty good beating. The hard covers are the most durable, but the material the soft cover is bound in is pretty strong too. You can rip those soft covers apart if you try, but if it’s just sitting inside a bag it tends to be fine. The Cahier line that mimics the Field Notes style is a pretty stiff bit of cardboard and the stitch style means it doesn’t fold and bend as much as Field Notes book.

Speaking of the Field Notes books, their covers are way different than Moleskine’s. The standard Field Notes books come in a brown light cardboard cover that’s the same color as a paper grocery store bag. They’re pretty floppy too, closer to something like the cover you’d find on standard spiral notebook. That doesn’t mean they’re not durable though. The floppiness means the Field Notes notebooks fit more comfortably in your pocket. They roll up in your pocket easily, which is a nice perk if that’s more your style. The binding is three staples, which feels tough and makes it so you can flip the book around or bend it to suit your needs.

While Field Notes’ covers are pretty standard, they do have some special edition books worth pointing out. Their cherry wood cover is a bit more durable than their cardboard covers, their Pitch Black notebook features a stocky 100 lb “blacktop cover,” and their Expedition notebooks (my personal favorite, if you’re curious) are tear proof and pretty hard to destroy. The Expedition notebooks also waterproof, which is handy if you have your notebook in a garage or take it out into any kind of weather.

Both Companies Have Similar Paper Quality and Variety

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes
Moleskine on the left, Field Notes on the right

Besides the cover, paper quality and variety are the most important things about a notebook. Both companies give you a lot of options.

Moleskine offers all of their notebooks with ruled, squared or plain paper. On their popular models, including all the pocket-sized notebooks, they also offer dot-grid paper. Field Notes only offers ruled, squared, and plain, but also offers a mixed pack (remember Field Notes are always sold in threes) where you get one plain notebook, one ruled notebook, and one graph notebook. Some of the Field Notes special editions do come with dot-grid paper too, including the Pitch Black and Expedition notebook.

I’m no paper expert, but the quality of paper in both the standard editions of Field Notes and Moleskine notebooks seem similar. Ballpoint pens don’t leak through, but markers will. Writing with a pencil also works fine. Neither has thick, heavy stock paper that’ll work well with markers or paints. Put bluntly, neither paper is particularly great. If there is a noticeable difference, it’s that Moleskine’s paper tends to be a bit more yellow, while Field Notes tends to be a much more vibrant white. So if that matters to you, then it’s something to consider. Moleskine’s paper is acid-free, 70 gsm, 47 lb text stock. Field Notes changes their paper around depending edition, but they seem to use 50 lb text stock the most. That’s about the same quality as cheap printer paper. If you’re curious to read more about the paper in each, here’s a deep dive into the paper used in Moleskines. If you want to see the various papers used in Field Notes notebooks, Three Staples has a pretty comprehensive guide.

Both companies also offer some specialty paper options. For example, Moleskine has a sketch album that includes sketch-grade paper. As for Field Notes, the previously mentioned Expedition notebook features waterproof, tearproof paper. Likewise, the Pitch Black edition has a 50lb stock paper on the inside, which makes it a bit tougher than the standard paper.

Field Notes Keeps It Simple but Moleskine Has More “Special Editions”

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

On top of their standard notebooks, Moleskine also offer a bunch of themed notebooks made for specific writing themes like keeping a film journal and even city-specific notebooks for travel. They have notebooks just for music notation, storyboarding, and even one influenced by Japanese scrolls. Beyond those, Moleskine also routinely releases special notebooks with branded covers from the likes of Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Batman, and more. They even offer “smart notebooks” that work with Adobe Creative Cloud and Evernote.

Field Notes takes a much simpler approach. Aside from their regular line of notebooks and the Pitch Black and Expedition editions we’ve already mentioned (which may also be limited runs, but have been in print for a while now), they also release a variety of colored special editions throughout the year. For example, right now they have the Shenandoah pack, the Chicago 3-pack, and the Sweet Tooth Edition. They also have specialty notebooks for logging flights or your trip to the county fair. Right now, they have a fun little workshop companion pack for different DIY projects. These special editions are so popular that Field Notes even has as subscription service if you don’t want to miss any of them.

The Verdict: “Best” Depends On Whether It’ll Actually Live In Your Pocket

When we started this comparison, we noted that it was a bit unfair because Moleskine offered such a massive variety of notebook options. Still, even with those options, which notebooks is best for you depends on what you’ll use it for.

Personally, none of the Moleskine models fit in my pocket comfortably, so if I’m planning on lugging a notebook around with me full-time, it’s a Field Notes notebook. Likewise, if I’m working on anything out in the world, whether it’s in a garage or taking measurements during some weird DIY science project, I like the Field Notes notebooks because they can bend around a lot easier.

But if I’m doing more than that, especially if I’m planning on doing any sketching or longer writing, then Moleskine notebooks are better suited for my needs. The elastic wrap and bookmark is also a killer feature for some people, though I never make use of either. The pocket in the back of Moleskines, while a fun idea, has always always been a useless little addition to me, though I’m sure others have found some use for it.

Of course, beyond that, it’s about aesthetics. Which one looks better to you? Are you a fan of fun colors or do you prefer designs based on pop culture? Is a hard cover necessary? Do you want a simple notebook, or do you want bookmarks and closure straps? Pick the one you’ll actually use. Notebooks are worthless if they’re not written in.

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

When it comes to pocket-sized notebooks, two companies stand above the rest: Moleskine and Field Notes. Both are incredibly popular and work great for what they are, but choosing between the two is difficult. We’re here to help you make that choice.

The Contenders

While you have thousands of options for paper notebooks, Moleskine and Field Notes are two of our favorites. Both companies make fantastic notebooks, but they’re made differently, have different paper selections, and have drastically different covers. For the sake of consistency, we’re going to stick to pocket-sized notebooks for this comparison, since that’s the only size Field Notes makes. Moleskine has a much broader selection of sizes though, so if you’re looking for something larger, that’s the brand you’ll want to go with. With that out of the way, let’s take a close look at the two contenders.

  • Moleskine: Love them or hate them, Moleskine notebooks are ubiquitous. There’s a cult following around the company that’s at least partially due to the their trademark hard covers, the variety of notebook sizes the company offers, and a small selection of different types of paper. Moleskine notebooks are available everywhere and their pocket-sized options come in a variety of types specific to individual needs. Their pocket-sized notebooks (3 1/2" x 5 1/2") come packed with 192 pages and retail starting at $12. Moleskines are designed in Italy and manufactured in China.
  • Field Notes: If Moleskine are the Evernote of notebook brands, Field Notes are the plain text equivalent. With only one exception, they stick to a single size (3 1/2" x 5 1/2"), though they offer a variety of different colors and types of paper. Picking the right notebook for you is as simple as finding the paper style you prefer. Field Notes are sold in a three-pack of 48-page notebooks as opposed to one single, larger notebook. Pretty much all editions of the Field Notes three-packs are $10. Field Notes are designed and made in the U.S.

You can walk into just about any department store or bookshop and walk out with a notebook, but these two are so popular they have each have their own followings, and for good reason. Let’s take this comparison a little deeper.

http://lifehacker.com/five-best-pape…

Moleskine Has More Covers but Both Are Durable

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Comparing the covers of Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks is a little disingenuous because of the number of options Moleskine offers compared to the one basic Field Notes cover, but it’s necessary nonetheless.

Moleskine notebooks come with three basic cover options, soft, hard, and cardboard. Let’s take a closer look:

  • Hard cover: Moleskine’s hard cover notebooks are their bread and butter. The hard cover notebook is what most people think of when they think of Moleskine. The cover is cardboard bound, features a cloth bookmark, an elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket in the back.
  • Soft cover: Moleskine’s soft cover notebooks are basically the same as their hardcover, but feature a much more flexible cover. Like the hard cover, they come with a bookmark, elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket.
  • Cardboard: If there’s a direct analog between Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks, it’s Moleskine’s Cahier line. The stitching in these notebooks goes across the spine in a way that looks like it’s done by hand. The covers are a lighter cardboard than the hard covers. This notebook does not have the trademark elastic enclosure of other Moleskine notebooks. This line of notebooks comes in three different sizes, but the 64-page pocket version is the closest to Field Notes. Like Field Notes, these come in three packs that retail for $10.

In my experience, all three of Moleskine’s notebook styles are durable and can take a pretty good beating. The hard covers are the most durable, but the material the soft cover is bound in is pretty strong too. You can rip those soft covers apart if you try, but if it’s just sitting inside a bag it tends to be fine. The Cahier line that mimics the Field Notes style is a pretty stiff bit of cardboard and the stitch style means it doesn’t fold and bend as much as Field Notes book.

Speaking of the Field Notes books, their covers are way different than Moleskine’s. The standard Field Notes books come in a brown light cardboard cover that’s the same color as a paper grocery store bag. They’re pretty floppy too, closer to something like the cover you’d find on standard spiral notebook. That doesn’t mean they’re not durable though. The floppiness means the Field Notes notebooks fit more comfortably in your pocket. They roll up in your pocket easily, which is a nice perk if that’s more your style. The binding is three staples, which feels tough and makes it so you can flip the book around or bend it to suit your needs.

While Field Notes’ covers are pretty standard, they do have some special edition books worth pointing out. Their cherry wood cover is a bit more durable than their cardboard covers, their Pitch Black notebook features a stocky 100 lb “blacktop cover,” and their Expedition notebooks (my personal favorite, if you’re curious) are tear proof and pretty hard to destroy. The Expedition notebooks also waterproof, which is handy if you have your notebook in a garage or take it out into any kind of weather.

Both Companies Have Similar Paper Quality and Variety

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes
Moleskine on the left, Field Notes on the right

Besides the cover, paper quality and variety are the most important things about a notebook. Both companies give you a lot of options.

Moleskine offers all of their notebooks with ruled, squared or plain paper. On their popular models, including all the pocket-sized notebooks, they also offer dot-grid paper. Field Notes only offers ruled, squared, and plain, but also offers a mixed pack (remember Field Notes are always sold in threes) where you get one plain notebook, one ruled notebook, and one graph notebook. Some of the Field Notes special editions do come with dot-grid paper too, including the Pitch Black and Expedition notebook.

I’m no paper expert, but the quality of paper in both the standard editions of Field Notes and Moleskine notebooks seem similar. Ballpoint pens don’t leak through, but markers will. Writing with a pencil also works fine. Neither has thick, heavy stock paper that’ll work well with markers or paints. Put bluntly, neither paper is particularly great. If there is a noticeable difference, it’s that Moleskine’s paper tends to be a bit more yellow, while Field Notes tends to be a much more vibrant white. So if that matters to you, then it’s something to consider. Moleskine’s paper is acid-free, 70 gsm, 47 lb text stock. Field Notes changes their paper around depending edition, but they seem to use 50 lb text stock the most. That’s about the same quality as cheap printer paper. If you’re curious to read more about the paper in each, here’s a deep dive into the paper used in Moleskines. If you want to see the various papers used in Field Notes notebooks, Three Staples has a pretty comprehensive guide.

Both companies also offer some specialty paper options. For example, Moleskine has a sketch album that includes sketch-grade paper. As for Field Notes, the previously mentioned Expedition notebook features waterproof, tearproof paper. Likewise, the Pitch Black edition has a 50lb stock paper on the inside, which makes it a bit tougher than the standard paper.

Field Notes Keeps It Simple but Moleskine Has More “Special Editions”

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

On top of their standard notebooks, Moleskine also offer a bunch of themed notebooks made for specific writing themes like keeping a film journal and even city-specific notebooks for travel. They have notebooks just for music notation, storyboarding, and even one influenced by Japanese scrolls. Beyond those, Moleskine also routinely releases special notebooks with branded covers from the likes of Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Batman, and more. They even offer “smart notebooks” that work with Adobe Creative Cloud and Evernote.

Field Notes takes a much simpler approach. Aside from their regular line of notebooks and the Pitch Black and Expedition editions we’ve already mentioned (which may also be limited runs, but have been in print for a while now), they also release a variety of colored special editions throughout the year. For example, right now they have the Shenandoah pack, the Chicago 3-pack, and the Sweet Tooth Edition. They also have specialty notebooks for logging flights or your trip to the county fair. Right now, they have a fun little workshop companion pack for different DIY projects. These special editions are so popular that Field Notes even has as subscription service if you don’t want to miss any of them.

The Verdict: “Best” Depends On Whether It’ll Actually Live In Your Pocket

When we started this comparison, we noted that it was a bit unfair because Moleskine offered such a massive variety of notebook options. Still, even with those options, which notebooks is best for you depends on what you’ll use it for.

Personally, none of the Moleskine models fit in my pocket comfortably, so if I’m planning on lugging a notebook around with me full-time, it’s a Field Notes notebook. Likewise, if I’m working on anything out in the world, whether it’s in a garage or taking measurements during some weird DIY science project, I like the Field Notes notebooks because they can bend around a lot easier.

But if I’m doing more than that, especially if I’m planning on doing any sketching or longer writing, then Moleskine notebooks are better suited for my needs. The elastic wrap and bookmark is also a killer feature for some people, though I never make use of either. The pocket in the back of Moleskines, while a fun idea, has always always been a useless little addition to me, though I’m sure others have found some use for it.

Of course, beyond that, it’s about aesthetics. Which one looks better to you? Are you a fan of fun colors or do you prefer designs based on pop culture? Is a hard cover necessary? Do you want a simple notebook, or do you want bookmarks and closure straps? Pick the one you’ll actually use. Notebooks are worthless if they’re not written in.

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

When it comes to pocket-sized notebooks, two companies stand above the rest: Moleskine and Field Notes. Both are incredibly popular and work great for what they are, but choosing between the two is difficult. We’re here to help you make that choice.

The Contenders

While you have thousands of options for paper notebooks, Moleskine and Field Notes are two of our favorites. Both companies make fantastic notebooks, but they’re made differently, have different paper selections, and have drastically different covers. For the sake of consistency, we’re going to stick to pocket-sized notebooks for this comparison, since that’s the only size Field Notes makes. Moleskine has a much broader selection of sizes though, so if you’re looking for something larger, that’s the brand you’ll want to go with. With that out of the way, let’s take a close look at the two contenders.

  • Moleskine: Love them or hate them, Moleskine notebooks are ubiquitous. There’s a cult following around the company that’s at least partially due to the their trademark hard covers, the variety of notebook sizes the company offers, and a small selection of different types of paper. Moleskine notebooks are available everywhere and their pocket-sized options come in a variety of types specific to individual needs. Their pocket-sized notebooks (3 1/2" x 5 1/2") come packed with 192 pages and retail starting at $12. Moleskines are designed in Italy and manufactured in China.
  • Field Notes: If Moleskine are the Evernote of notebook brands, Field Notes are the plain text equivalent. With only one exception, they stick to a single size (3 1/2" x 5 1/2"), though they offer a variety of different colors and types of paper. Picking the right notebook for you is as simple as finding the paper style you prefer. Field Notes are sold in a three-pack of 48-page notebooks as opposed to one single, larger notebook. Pretty much all editions of the Field Notes three-packs are $10. Field Notes are designed and made in the U.S.

You can walk into just about any department store or bookshop and walk out with a notebook, but these two are so popular they have each have their own followings, and for good reason. Let’s take this comparison a little deeper.

http://lifehacker.com/five-best-pape…

Moleskine Has More Covers but Both Are Durable

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

Comparing the covers of Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks is a little disingenuous because of the number of options Moleskine offers compared to the one basic Field Notes cover, but it’s necessary nonetheless.

Moleskine notebooks come with three basic cover options, soft, hard, and cardboard. Let’s take a closer look:

  • Hard cover: Moleskine’s hard cover notebooks are their bread and butter. The hard cover notebook is what most people think of when they think of Moleskine. The cover is cardboard bound, features a cloth bookmark, an elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket in the back.
  • Soft cover: Moleskine’s soft cover notebooks are basically the same as their hardcover, but feature a much more flexible cover. Like the hard cover, they come with a bookmark, elastic closure, and an expandable inner pocket.
  • Cardboard: If there’s a direct analog between Moleskine and Field Notes notebooks, it’s Moleskine’s Cahier line. The stitching in these notebooks goes across the spine in a way that looks like it’s done by hand. The covers are a lighter cardboard than the hard covers. This notebook does not have the trademark elastic enclosure of other Moleskine notebooks. This line of notebooks comes in three different sizes, but the 64-page pocket version is the closest to Field Notes. Like Field Notes, these come in three packs that retail for $10.

In my experience, all three of Moleskine’s notebook styles are durable and can take a pretty good beating. The hard covers are the most durable, but the material the soft cover is bound in is pretty strong too. You can rip those soft covers apart if you try, but if it’s just sitting inside a bag it tends to be fine. The Cahier line that mimics the Field Notes style is a pretty stiff bit of cardboard and the stitch style means it doesn’t fold and bend as much as Field Notes book.

Speaking of the Field Notes books, their covers are way different than Moleskine’s. The standard Field Notes books come in a brown light cardboard cover that’s the same color as a paper grocery store bag. They’re pretty floppy too, closer to something like the cover you’d find on standard spiral notebook. That doesn’t mean they’re not durable though. The floppiness means the Field Notes notebooks fit more comfortably in your pocket. They roll up in your pocket easily, which is a nice perk if that’s more your style. The binding is three staples, which feels tough and makes it so you can flip the book around or bend it to suit your needs.

While Field Notes’ covers are pretty standard, they do have some special edition books worth pointing out. Their cherry wood cover is a bit more durable than their cardboard covers, their Pitch Black notebook features a stocky 100 lb “blacktop cover,” and their Expedition notebooks (my personal favorite, if you’re curious) are tear proof and pretty hard to destroy. The Expedition notebooks also waterproof, which is handy if you have your notebook in a garage or take it out into any kind of weather.

Both Companies Have Similar Paper Quality and Variety

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes
Moleskine on the left, Field Notes on the right

Besides the cover, paper quality and variety are the most important things about a notebook. Both companies give you a lot of options.

Moleskine offers all of their notebooks with ruled, squared or plain paper. On their popular models, including all the pocket-sized notebooks, they also offer dot-grid paper. Field Notes only offers ruled, squared, and plain, but also offers a mixed pack (remember Field Notes are always sold in threes) where you get one plain notebook, one ruled notebook, and one graph notebook. Some of the Field Notes special editions do come with dot-grid paper too, including the Pitch Black and Expedition notebook.

I’m no paper expert, but the quality of paper in both the standard editions of Field Notes and Moleskine notebooks seem similar. Ballpoint pens don’t leak through, but markers will. Writing with a pencil also works fine. Neither has thick, heavy stock paper that’ll work well with markers or paints. Put bluntly, neither paper is particularly great. If there is a noticeable difference, it’s that Moleskine’s paper tends to be a bit more yellow, while Field Notes tends to be a much more vibrant white. So if that matters to you, then it’s something to consider. Moleskine’s paper is acid-free, 70 gsm, 47 lb text stock. Field Notes changes their paper around depending edition, but they seem to use 50 lb text stock the most. That’s about the same quality as cheap printer paper. If you’re curious to read more about the paper in each, here’s a deep dive into the paper used in Moleskines. If you want to see the various papers used in Field Notes notebooks, Three Staples has a pretty comprehensive guide.

Both companies also offer some specialty paper options. For example, Moleskine has a sketch album that includes sketch-grade paper. As for Field Notes, the previously mentioned Expedition notebook features waterproof, tearproof paper. Likewise, the Pitch Black edition has a 50lb stock paper on the inside, which makes it a bit tougher than the standard paper.

Field Notes Keeps It Simple but Moleskine Has More “Special Editions”

Pocket Paper Notebook Showdown: Moleskine vs. Field Notes

On top of their standard notebooks, Moleskine also offer a bunch of themed notebooks made for specific writing themes like keeping a film journal and even city-specific notebooks for travel. They have notebooks just for music notation, storyboarding, and even one influenced by Japanese scrolls. Beyond those, Moleskine also routinely releases special notebooks with branded covers from the likes of Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Batman, and more. They even offer “smart notebooks” that work with Adobe Creative Cloud and Evernote.

Field Notes takes a much simpler approach. Aside from their regular line of notebooks and the Pitch Black and Expedition editions we’ve already mentioned (which may also be limited runs, but have been in print for a while now), they also release a variety of colored special editions throughout the year. For example, right now they have the Shenandoah pack, the Chicago 3-pack, and the Sweet Tooth Edition. They also have specialty notebooks for logging flights or your trip to the county fair. Right now, they have a fun little workshop companion pack for different DIY projects. These special editions are so popular that Field Notes even has as subscription service if you don’t want to miss any of them.

The Verdict: “Best” Depends On Whether It’ll Actually Live In Your Pocket

When we started this comparison, we noted that it was a bit unfair because Moleskine offered such a massive variety of notebook options. Still, even with those options, which notebooks is best for you depends on what you’ll use it for.

Personally, none of the Moleskine models fit in my pocket comfortably, so if I’m planning on lugging a notebook around with me full-time, it’s a Field Notes notebook. Likewise, if I’m working on anything out in the world, whether it’s in a garage or taking measurements during some weird DIY science project, I like the Field Notes notebooks because they can bend around a lot easier.

But if I’m doing more than that, especially if I’m planning on doing any sketching or longer writing, then Moleskine notebooks are better suited for my needs. The elastic wrap and bookmark is also a killer feature for some people, though I never make use of either. The pocket in the back of Moleskines, while a fun idea, has always always been a useless little addition to me, though I’m sure others have found some use for it.

Of course, beyond that, it’s about aesthetics. Which one looks better to you? Are you a fan of fun colors or do you prefer designs based on pop culture? Is a hard cover necessary? Do you want a simple notebook, or do you want bookmarks and closure straps? Pick the one you’ll actually use. Notebooks are worthless if they’re not written in.

Unload Your Thoughts and Ideas With a “Mind Capture” Ritual

Unload Your Thoughts and Ideas With a "Mind Capture" Ritual

Your mind is always bouncing around thoughts and ideas in your head, but it’s hard to capture and understand them if you’re constantly being distracted. This exercise can help you unload everything on your mind so it’s easy to assess later.

Some people like to meditate when they want to clear their head and focus, but if you prefer something more active, Chris Bailey at A Life of Productivity recommends a “mind capture” ritual. Grab a notepad and a pen, then separate yourself from all electronic devices, people, sounds, and other distractions. Just you, your thoughts, and a way to capture them. Some of the things you write will be useful and actionable ideas, other things might be worries you have, while others might just be random thoughts. Don’t worry about what you’re writing, just get it down on paper.

After 15 minutes, go over what you’ve written. Maybe an idea that’s been gathering dust in your head finally seems like a reality now that you can see it. Maybe some of the things you’re stressed about don’t look as terrible on paper as they feel in your head. Do this ritual whenever you feel stressed, bored, or any time you feel like you have a few minutes to spare. You’re mind is full of good ideas worth pursuing and thoughts that need addressing, but you’ll never get to them if you can’t see them.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-use-min…

The simple (but powerful) 15-minute ‘mind capture’ ritual | A Life of Productivity

Photo by Kai Chan Vong.


Remember Your Dreams by Writing About Them Like Stories

Remember Your Dreams by Writing About Them Like Stories

If you want to remember your dreams, a dream journal is the way to go. However, if you have trouble recounting your dreams as you’re writing, try writing in present tense, like it’s a story that’s happening to you right now.

A therapist friend suggested this tip when I complained about not being able to remember a dream. She pointed out that writing in present tense helps you better jog your memory and relive the experience of your dream. I tried it for a few nights, and it works surprisingly well. Of course, it also helps to write as soon after waking up as possible.

If you take notes about your dreams, give it a try next time you’re writing.

Photo by rhonda_jenkins.

Kick Off Your Daily Journaling Habit With This Simple Template

Kick Off Your Daily Journaling Habit With This Simple Template

Journaling every day is a habit that comes with a lot of great benefits, like dealing with emotions, focusing on goals, and developing creativity. If you don’t know where to start, this simple template can help you get the ball rolling.

http://lifehacker.com/why-you-should…

Like most things, the hardest part about journaling is getting started. Maybe you’ve already got a nice journal and pen, but when you open it you end up staring at the pages wondering what you should write. You’re not alone! That’s why Thanh Pham at Asian Efficiency has provided a great template to kick-start your daily journaling:

  • What happened to you that day (events).
  • Outcomes, tasks, questions. Outcomes are the big things you want to achieve for the day. Tasks are the smaller steps to achieving outcomes.
  • Write down 3 accomplishments.
  • Questions (all optional, pick as you please):
  • What did I read?
  • What did I learn?
  • What did I do to help my future?
  • How did I help someone today?
  • Who do I love?
  • What am I grateful for?

Journals let you record memories you want to hold onto, show yourself the progress you’ve made over time, and gives you an opportunity to record your own personal history. Once you’ve gotten into the habit of writing something every day, you can start getting more creative, reflective, and exploratory as you see fit. You can find more templates and other great questions to prompt your journaling at the link below.

How to Make Journaling a Ritual | Asian Efficiency

Photo by Image Catalog.

Moleskine Unveils New Notebooks Designed for Productivity and Organization

Moleskine Unveils New Notebooks Designed for Productivity and Organization

Moleskine’s notebooks are some of your favorites, and today the company is taking the wraps off of “Moleskine Pro,” a reboot of the original with some added features designed for productivity. The new notebooks feature detachable to-do lists, adhesive tabs for organization, numbered pages and a table of contents, and more.http://lifehacker.com/five-best-pape…

The new notebooks are part notebook and part planner, and have pages and sections designed to be used for things like meeting notes, brainstorming suggestions, meeting minutes and people in attendance, next actions, and so on. The new notebooks also have numbered pages, and a table of contents that can be filled out as the notebook is filled out, which makes it easy to flip through to find something you need without having to remember by feel how thick the notebook was when you wrote something down you want to find again.

Additionally, the Pro line included adhesive stick notes you can use as section tabs, just to keep everything neatly organized, extra large workbooks for larger projects, drawings and sketches, or anything that needs more space, and even a portfolio notebook with an accordion file, if that’s how you like to roll—with space to carry handouts or other documents. There’s even a notebook “tool belt” that you can attach to the cover of a notebook that—after much demand—can hold small accessories, pens, and other things.

Of course, if you prefer the empty freedom of the original Moleskine notebooks, they’re available too—but the new line is geared right for office workers and creative pros who need to take tons of notes, but also want to stay organized. The new notebooks, for what it’s worth, also fit nicely with the Bullet Journal productivity method. Hit the link below to check them out.http://lifehacker.com/the-bullet-jou…

Moleskine

Moodnotes Logs Your Mood and Thinking Habits to Help with Self-Awareness

Moodnotes Logs Your Mood and Thinking Habits to Help with Self-Awareness

iPhone: We know that journaling is a great way to increase your self-awareness, but it’s tough to do sometimes. Moodnotes is a new app that makes it easy to track your mood, drop in some journal notes, and help you develop a little more perspective on yourself.http://lifehacker.com/why-you-should…

Moodnotes was created by Thriveport and the developers of Monument Valley as a means to track your emotions throughout the day. Moodnotes sends you a notification and asks you to rate how you feel using a smiley face. Depending on your response, it’ll ask follow-up questions to get you to write a little bit more about your day and unpack how you really feel. For example, if you have a series of days where you don’t feel good, the app will ask you a bunch of questions about how you’re feeling. Beyond that, it tracks your mood over the course of time so you can see how you’re improving (or not). It’s not just for bad moods, anxiety, or depression, Moodnotes is useful for everyone who’s trying to be a little more self-aware of how they feel throughout the day.

Moodnotes ($3.99) | iTunes App Store via Wired

What to Write About When You Journal

What to Write About When You Journal

It’s a good idea to keep a daily journal, but the words flow better for some than others. If you’re not sure what to write about in your daily journal, use these tips as a starting point.

Journaling daily is good for your mental health and creativity. Sometimes it’s easy to start writing, and other times you may be stumped. Time writer Eric Barker offers a few suggestions for what to write about in your daily notebook:

Write down what you’re looking forward to
People who devote time to anticipating fun experiences are happier.
So at least once a week, make plans, write them down and when you need a boost, look at the great things you have coming up…

Write down your progress
Want to know your strengths and weaknesses? Make predictions, write them down and compare against results. This is an excellent way to see where your natural abilities are and if you’re improving.

Write down your anxieties
Research shows writing about your worries can calm you and even increase performance…

These can be great starting points to get the ball rolling. Another suggestion of what to include in your journal? Updates on three areas of life: nutrition, exercise and goals.

In fact, you could apply Barker’s prompts to each of those three areas. For more detail, check out his full post.

This One Simple Thing Can Make Your Life Much Better | Time

Photo by RaphaelJeanneret.