Tag Archives: Keys

This Is What The Key For A McLaren Senna Looks Like

When people talk about multi-million dollar cars, everyone wants to talk about the speed. Or the luxury. Or the GOOOOOOOLD. But I like the littlest details, the ones most people don’t even think about. Like this, the key fob for the McLaren Senna.

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A Memory Champion’s Best Mental Trick for Remembering Where You Put Your Keys

If you’re tired of misplacing your keys around the house, this explosive memory trick will help you remember. All you need is a little imagination.

In this video from the Business Insider YouTube channel, Ron White, world record holder and two-time National Memory Champion, shares his trick for keeping his keys from getting lost. White suggests we misplace keys and other everyday objects because we go on mental autopilot, especially after a long day. To combat that, you need to find a way to focus on the moment you set something down.

For keys, White recommends you imagine they’re a small bomb that goes off wherever you toss them. For example, if you stick them on the counter, imagine a chunk of the counter top getting blasted out and your cabinets catching fire. This makes your brain focus on the moment of placement and associates a visual memory with a distinct physical location. After all, you can’t imagine how your coffee table might blow up if your brain doesn’t take a moment to study the environment first. Now when you need your keys, you’ll go “Oh yeah, I blew up the nightstand a few hours ago.”

http://lifehacker.com/5897708/how-to…

A national memory champion explains how to never misplace your keys ever again | YouTube

This DIY Audio Jack Key Holder Lets You Plug In Your Keys for Safe Keeping

You don’t have to be an audiophile to appreciate this DIY audio jack key holder, but it certainly helps. Mounted on your wall, you’ll always have a place to plug in your keys when you get home—and you’ll know where to find it. It’s easy to build, too.

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Where To Look For Your Lost Car Keys First

Where To Look For Your Lost Car Keys First

A couple weeks ago, I lost the keys to my beloved motorcycle. After taking the quandary to Kinja almost 300 folks chimed in having faced the same struggle. The solidarity was as great as the range of responses. If you’re almost ready to give up hope looking for your keys, check these weird spots.

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Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

If you’re not careful, your keychain gets out of control pretty fast. Before you know it, you’ll have five keys for things you don’t own anymore, a ton of rewards cards, and few tools you don’t really need. You can handle this situation in a lot of ways. Let’s look at a few of the best.

Segregate Your Keys

Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

First things first, it’s time to organize those keys into a meaningful order. Lay all your keys (and anything else on your keychains) out on a table. Pick through and get rid of anything you don’t want and keys you don’t use anymore.

Then, group your keys together by function. Put transportation related keys on one ring, work keys on another, occasional keys elsewhere, and so forth. After everything is sorted, remove any keys you don’t need.

If you’d like a quick-release option to ditch or add keys, mini-carabiners like this work great, as does the True Utility Keyring system, and something like a FREEKey. With these, you can leave a set of keys in your house or car and only attach them when you need them. This way, you only have your everyday keys with you all the time, and anything else can get added on later.

Consolidate Loyalty Cards Onto Your Phone

Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

One of the most obnoxious ways a keyring might bloat in size is loyalty card key fobs. These handy, but space-wasting cards are great when you hit up the grocery store, but they’re obnoxious at all other times of the day. Thankfully, you can easily ditch them.

Both Android and iOS have built-in system to deal with rewards cards. If you have a store’s app, you can load up Google Wallet or Passbook to store your rewards card number. If you don’t want to download a ton of apps, we like Key Ring as a pretty simple solution that stores all your rewards cards numbers in one single place. Just scan your rewards cards into Key Ring, and you can throw out the little fobs and never think of them again.

Get Rid of the Key Ring with an Alternative Keychain

Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

Sometimes, the bulk of a keychain comes more from the chain itself. The common split key rings are hard to organize, come in all kinds of sizes, and generally add a lot more bulk than you need to your keys. So, perhaps unsurprisingly, there are a lot of alternative systems out there for organizing your keys.

You have a ton of options for alternative key chains—from DIY solutions to commercial ones—here are a few of our favorites that cut down on the bulk:

  • Keydisk: The Keydisk system is pretty simple, but it works well. Keys go in a triangular box, and fold out easily when you need them. It holds up to six keys, and works with car remotes. It slims down your keys only a little bit, but more importantly it makes them jangle around a lot less.
  • A zip tie: If you’re looking to really just take down a little bulk from a few keys, reader Dan Kirshenbaum’s system is to just use a zip tie instead of a keychain.
  • Keyport: The Keyport stuffs all your keys into a little box and makes it so you can slide them out easily. The whole thing is about the size of a Tic Tac box, and provided you only have a few keys, works really well.
  • Swiss Army-Style Folding Keychain: Chopping off the tops of your keys and stuffing them inside a Swiss Army knife is a old DIY trick. It might make it a little tough to get through TSA, but it definitely cuts off a ton of bulk from your keys. If you don’t want to DIY your own, KeySmart is a solid commercial solution.
  • Chop off the tops completely: You can also just go all in and chop off the tops of your keys completely. Redditor mattfrancis13 cut off the tops of his keys, then clipped them together with a nut and bolt. It’s an insanely small setup, and it’s certainly the most minimal approach.

There are plenty of other solutions for key storage out there, so it’s worth experimenting or looking around if none of the above fit your needs.

Use a Pocket Clip System

Four Ways to Minimize Your Keychain

Another method of dealing with clunky key chain is to use a pocket clip system. Essentially, the idea here requires you to hook your keys to the top of your pocket so they don’t jangle around and stab you as much. It also makes it so you can clip your keys to your belt, bag, or any other pocket on your pants.

Like the split key alternatives, you have a lot of different ways to do this. This suspension clip, a hook like this, or a quick release system like this all do the trick. All these clips keep your keys handy and they’re lightweight.

Photos by Zurbagan, indigolotos, Kurt Nordstrom.

Downsize Your Bulky Keys By Chopping Off the Tops

Downsize Your Bulky Keys By Chopping Off the Tops

Keys are large and have a tendency to destroy pockets. If you’re sick of carrying around your bulk of a keychain, Redditor mattfrancis13 cut off the top of his keys to make them a lot smaller.

The basic idea here is that mattfrancis13 clamped down each key, sawed off the tops, drilled a hole into them, and then clipped them together with a nut and bolt. They look like they might be easy to lose, but you don’t mind the risk, it’s a pretty simple way to cut down on your key size. Otherwise, you can always stuff them into a Leatherman or a Swiss Army knife. Head over to Reddit for the full guide.

I was tired of my bulk keys, so I made this! | Reddit via WonderHowTo

Shloosl Copies Your House Keys Using a Smartphone Photograph

Shloosl Copies Your House Keys Using a Smartphone Photograph

Take two pictures of a housekey with your smartphone, email them to Shloosl, and receive a physical copy of that key a couple of days later. And it works. Seriously.

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Mechanical Keyboards, Bad Bosses, and Saving Money on Computer Parts

This week on the podcast we’re talking about the noisy glory of mechanical keyboards, detecting a bad boss before you take a job, and saving the most money when building a computer. We’re also answering your questions about mobile app security, Android launchers, and building your own NAS.

How to Listen to This Week’s Episode

Here’s how you can listen to our episode:

News and Top Stories

  • Gmail for Android Adds New Inbox and Slide-Out Navigation: Gmail just got a new update with a brand new inbox featuring labels, contact images, and indicators for your promotional, update, and social notifications. Additionally, new slide-out navigation makes it easy to access whatever you need when you need it. The delete button has gone missing, but you can bring it back pretty easily.

  • LinkedIn Adds Two-Factor Authentication, Enable It Now: LinkedIn has just jumped on the (very important) two-factor authentication wagon. You can, and should, now enable this enhanced security layer for the professional network.

  • Feedly Will Support Syncing for Reeder, Press, and Other Apps: Feedly, our favorite Google Reader replacement, announced today that they’re opening their API to third party developers-including the people behind Reeder, Press, Newsify, and gReader-so you’ll be able to access your Feedly feeds in all of those apps and sync across devices long before Google Reader sunsets. They’re also planning on increasing their app’s speed, adding search, an extension-free webapp, and more. Head to Feedly’s blog post for more info.

  • Apple Updates OS X to 10.8.4, We Update Our Hackintosh Guide: Apple brought a lot of bug fixes with OS X 10.8.4, but also a couple of new (but minor) hackintosh issues. We’ve updated our guide to help get you through this latest update or start building a hackintosh from scratch with OS X 10.8.4.

  • How Can I Spot a Bad Boss Before I Take a Job? You just got a new job offer, and you’re excited to join the workforce again, but you don’t want to end up with a crazy boss. Before taking this new position, there are a few things you can do to find out if you’re in for trouble.

  • How to Choose the Best Mechanical Keyboard (and Why You’d Want To): Mechanical keyboards, or keyboards with full, individual switches under every key, have exploded in popularity recently, although the technology inside is as old as the keyboard itself. There’s really no substitute for that solid, clicking sensation under your fingers as you type, and the satisfying sound each key makes when you press it. However, choosing the best mechanical keyboard can be tricky, since there are dozens of models, different switch types, and more popping up every day. Here’s how to tell them all apart and pick the right one for you.

  • How to Save Money When You Build Your Own PC: Computers are expensive, and every dollar counts if you’re building one on a budget. If you pick the right parts, shop at the right stores, and use a few simple tricks, you can save quite a bit on that new PC.

Questions and Answers

  • How do I know apps aren’t stealing my login info when I login via Google, Facebook, or whatever? You can sometimes tell when an app uses OAuth, but if not you can just sign up with a Google (or whatever) account that you use for spam email (or one you don’t care about). If the app is legit, you’ll see it in your authorized apps settings in that account. If not, don’t trust that app. We’ve never actually heard of a mobile app trying to steal credentials this way, however, and we don’t think it’ll happen. Although not impossible to pull off, Apple and Google know a lot about developers through their developer accounts. There are much better password phishing strategies that involve less work and fewer risks.
  • I want to get a custom launcher for my non-rooted Android phone, but I feel like I’ll miss stuff from the OEM launcher. Any tips? Most launchers, such as NOVA, will handle all the features you want and you won’t miss much. Fortunately they’re free and you can try them out. If you don’t like a launcher, just switch back to the OEM one you’re used to. You don’t have to make a commitment unless you want a pro version of one of them.
  • I am attempting to build a NAS for myself, but I’m not really sure where to start. I have seen plenty of guides on how to create a desktop computer but very few on NAS. Do you have any suggestions on a place to start? Yes! Our NAS Building Guide and our Computer Building Guide (which actually shows a NAS being built as a demonstration).

Tips of the Week

Downloads of the Week

DOWNLOADSLIST

How Do I Submit a Question?

There are two ways to send in your question:

Please keep your questions as brief as possible. This means about 3-5 sentences for emails and 30-60 seconds for calls and videos. Your questions can be specific, but broader questions are generally better because they’ll apply to more people. For example, "how can I breathe new life into my old PDA?" is much better than "what can I do with an old HP iPAQ 210?" Either way, we look forward to hearing from you!

Mechanical Keyboards, Bad Bosses, and Saving Money on Computer Parts

This week on the podcast we’re talking about the noisy glory of mechanical keyboards, detecting a bad boss before you take a job, and saving the most money when building a computer. We’re also answering your questions about mobile app security, Android launchers, and building your own NAS.

How to Listen to This Week’s Episode

Here’s how you can listen to our episode:

News and Top Stories

  • Gmail for Android Adds New Inbox and Slide-Out Navigation: Gmail just got a new update with a brand new inbox featuring labels, contact images, and indicators for your promotional, update, and social notifications. Additionally, new slide-out navigation makes it easy to access whatever you need when you need it. The delete button has gone missing, but you can bring it back pretty easily.

  • LinkedIn Adds Two-Factor Authentication, Enable It Now: LinkedIn has just jumped on the (very important) two-factor authentication wagon. You can, and should, now enable this enhanced security layer for the professional network.

  • Feedly Will Support Syncing for Reeder, Press, and Other Apps: Feedly, our favorite Google Reader replacement, announced today that they’re opening their API to third party developers-including the people behind Reeder, Press, Newsify, and gReader-so you’ll be able to access your Feedly feeds in all of those apps and sync across devices long before Google Reader sunsets. They’re also planning on increasing their app’s speed, adding search, an extension-free webapp, and more. Head to Feedly’s blog post for more info.

  • Apple Updates OS X to 10.8.4, We Update Our Hackintosh Guide: Apple brought a lot of bug fixes with OS X 10.8.4, but also a couple of new (but minor) hackintosh issues. We’ve updated our guide to help get you through this latest update or start building a hackintosh from scratch with OS X 10.8.4.

  • How Can I Spot a Bad Boss Before I Take a Job? You just got a new job offer, and you’re excited to join the workforce again, but you don’t want to end up with a crazy boss. Before taking this new position, there are a few things you can do to find out if you’re in for trouble.

  • How to Choose the Best Mechanical Keyboard (and Why You’d Want To): Mechanical keyboards, or keyboards with full, individual switches under every key, have exploded in popularity recently, although the technology inside is as old as the keyboard itself. There’s really no substitute for that solid, clicking sensation under your fingers as you type, and the satisfying sound each key makes when you press it. However, choosing the best mechanical keyboard can be tricky, since there are dozens of models, different switch types, and more popping up every day. Here’s how to tell them all apart and pick the right one for you.

  • How to Save Money When You Build Your Own PC: Computers are expensive, and every dollar counts if you’re building one on a budget. If you pick the right parts, shop at the right stores, and use a few simple tricks, you can save quite a bit on that new PC.

Questions and Answers

  • How do I know apps aren’t stealing my login info when I login via Google, Facebook, or whatever? You can sometimes tell when an app uses OAuth, but if not you can just sign up with a Google (or whatever) account that you use for spam email (or one you don’t care about). If the app is legit, you’ll see it in your authorized apps settings in that account. If not, don’t trust that app. We’ve never actually heard of a mobile app trying to steal credentials this way, however, and we don’t think it’ll happen. Although not impossible to pull off, Apple and Google know a lot about developers through their developer accounts. There are much better password phishing strategies that involve less work and fewer risks.
  • I want to get a custom launcher for my non-rooted Android phone, but I feel like I’ll miss stuff from the OEM launcher. Any tips? Most launchers, such as NOVA, will handle all the features you want and you won’t miss much. Fortunately they’re free and you can try them out. If you don’t like a launcher, just switch back to the OEM one you’re used to. You don’t have to make a commitment unless you want a pro version of one of them.
  • I am attempting to build a NAS for myself, but I’m not really sure where to start. I have seen plenty of guides on how to create a desktop computer but very few on NAS. Do you have any suggestions on a place to start? Yes! Our NAS Building Guide and our Computer Building Guide (which actually shows a NAS being built as a demonstration).

Tips of the Week

Downloads of the Week

DOWNLOADSLIST

How Do I Submit a Question?

There are two ways to send in your question:

Please keep your questions as brief as possible. This means about 3-5 sentences for emails and 30-60 seconds for calls and videos. Your questions can be specific, but broader questions are generally better because they’ll apply to more people. For example, "how can I breathe new life into my old PDA?" is much better than "what can I do with an old HP iPAQ 210?" Either way, we look forward to hearing from you!

Mechanical Keyboards, Bad Bosses, and Saving Money on Computer Parts

This week on the podcast we’re talking about the noisy glory of mechanical keyboards, detecting a bad boss before you take a job, and saving the most money when building a computer. We’re also answering your questions about mobile app security, Android launchers, and building your own NAS.

How to Listen to This Week’s Episode

Here’s how you can listen to our episode:

News and Top Stories

  • Gmail for Android Adds New Inbox and Slide-Out Navigation: Gmail just got a new update with a brand new inbox featuring labels, contact images, and indicators for your promotional, update, and social notifications. Additionally, new slide-out navigation makes it easy to access whatever you need when you need it. The delete button has gone missing, but you can bring it back pretty easily.

  • LinkedIn Adds Two-Factor Authentication, Enable It Now: LinkedIn has just jumped on the (very important) two-factor authentication wagon. You can, and should, now enable this enhanced security layer for the professional network.

  • Feedly Will Support Syncing for Reeder, Press, and Other Apps: Feedly, our favorite Google Reader replacement, announced today that they’re opening their API to third party developers-including the people behind Reeder, Press, Newsify, and gReader-so you’ll be able to access your Feedly feeds in all of those apps and sync across devices long before Google Reader sunsets. They’re also planning on increasing their app’s speed, adding search, an extension-free webapp, and more. Head to Feedly’s blog post for more info.

  • Apple Updates OS X to 10.8.4, We Update Our Hackintosh Guide: Apple brought a lot of bug fixes with OS X 10.8.4, but also a couple of new (but minor) hackintosh issues. We’ve updated our guide to help get you through this latest update or start building a hackintosh from scratch with OS X 10.8.4.

  • How Can I Spot a Bad Boss Before I Take a Job? You just got a new job offer, and you’re excited to join the workforce again, but you don’t want to end up with a crazy boss. Before taking this new position, there are a few things you can do to find out if you’re in for trouble.

  • How to Choose the Best Mechanical Keyboard (and Why You’d Want To): Mechanical keyboards, or keyboards with full, individual switches under every key, have exploded in popularity recently, although the technology inside is as old as the keyboard itself. There’s really no substitute for that solid, clicking sensation under your fingers as you type, and the satisfying sound each key makes when you press it. However, choosing the best mechanical keyboard can be tricky, since there are dozens of models, different switch types, and more popping up every day. Here’s how to tell them all apart and pick the right one for you.

  • How to Save Money When You Build Your Own PC: Computers are expensive, and every dollar counts if you’re building one on a budget. If you pick the right parts, shop at the right stores, and use a few simple tricks, you can save quite a bit on that new PC.

Questions and Answers

  • How do I know apps aren’t stealing my login info when I login via Google, Facebook, or whatever? You can sometimes tell when an app uses OAuth, but if not you can just sign up with a Google (or whatever) account that you use for spam email (or one you don’t care about). If the app is legit, you’ll see it in your authorized apps settings in that account. If not, don’t trust that app. We’ve never actually heard of a mobile app trying to steal credentials this way, however, and we don’t think it’ll happen. Although not impossible to pull off, Apple and Google know a lot about developers through their developer accounts. There are much better password phishing strategies that involve less work and fewer risks.
  • I want to get a custom launcher for my non-rooted Android phone, but I feel like I’ll miss stuff from the OEM launcher. Any tips? Most launchers, such as NOVA, will handle all the features you want and you won’t miss much. Fortunately they’re free and you can try them out. If you don’t like a launcher, just switch back to the OEM one you’re used to. You don’t have to make a commitment unless you want a pro version of one of them.
  • I am attempting to build a NAS for myself, but I’m not really sure where to start. I have seen plenty of guides on how to create a desktop computer but very few on NAS. Do you have any suggestions on a place to start? Yes! Our NAS Building Guide and our Computer Building Guide (which actually shows a NAS being built as a demonstration).

Tips of the Week

Downloads of the Week

DOWNLOADSLIST

How Do I Submit a Question?

There are two ways to send in your question:

Please keep your questions as brief as possible. This means about 3-5 sentences for emails and 30-60 seconds for calls and videos. Your questions can be specific, but broader questions are generally better because they’ll apply to more people. For example, "how can I breathe new life into my old PDA?" is much better than "what can I do with an old HP iPAQ 210?" Either way, we look forward to hearing from you!