Tag Archives: Lifehacker Video

The Lifehacker Guide to Surviving Black Friday

The Friday after Thanksgiving is one of the best times of the year to score deals on everything from TVs to gadgets, but braving the swarming mass of shoppers is a challenge. These tips will keep you on your toes and ready to snag the deals you have your eye on.

Last year, 60% of Americans went shopping on Black Friday and spent about $67 billion. If you want to get in on the deal hunting action, here’s what you need to know:

  • Get in line early: Some stores will open as early as Thursday afternoon, and many steadfast shoppers will start getting in line for other stores six to eight hours before they open. It might seem like long hours, but you could net savings of up to $70 per hour.
  • Do your research: Know what deals you want and know where they’ll be inside the store. That way you can get in, grab the goods, and get out.
  • Dress appropriately: The more layers you can put on the better. It’ll be cold while you wait in line, and a little extra padding can help you fend off feisty shoppers.
  • Stay calm, comfortable, and humble: Tensions will be running high, so it’s important to keep a level head as products go flying off the shelves. Stay hydrated and bring a snack so you don’t get hangry. And if you manage to grab an awesome deal on a limited product, avoid gloating to other shoppers. You never know what they might do.

Of course, the best way to take on Black Friday is from the comfort of your own home. There will be tons of Cyber Monday deals, so skip the crowds and shop in your pajamas. You save yourself a bunch of money and a whole lot of stress.

How to Cook a Faster, Juicy Turkey with a Salt Crust

Don’t have all day to waste cooking a turkey this Thanksgiving? Try this trick from Chef Matt Griffin at Fedora: cook the turkey in a salt crust for a quick, juicy bird.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • A 10 to 12 pound turkey
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • 1/2 cup of honey
  • zest from 1/2 a lemon
  • 1 teaspoon of thyme
  • 4 cups of egg whites
  • 2 cups of peppercorns
  • 32 cups of kosher salt. Yeah, you read that right. 32 cups.

Wrap the wings in tin foil and coat the turkey in butter, both under and over the skin. Follow up with your choice of glaze (in this case,the lemon zest, thyme, and honey), which will keep the skin from becoming overly salty. Insert stuffing, if applicable, and tie the turkey’s legs together with twine so everything cooks evenly.

Then, whisk the egg whites in a large bowl until they become foamy. Put it in a large container with the salt and peppercorns and mix it all together. Add some water and mix well, until the salt mixture looks kind of like wet sand (about 4 cups). Spread a thick layer on a pan, put the turkey on top, and completely encase it in the salt crust.

Heat your oven to 400 degrees and put the turkey in. The salt crust will lock in the moisture and speed up the baking process—the turkey should be fully cooked in only an hour and a half. When it’s ready, take it out and use a kitchen hammer to crack off the salt crust, and remove any excess with a damp rag.

The turkey won’t have that perfect, glistening skin that an all-day turkey would, but once you carve it up, it’ll look just fine, and all in just an hour and a half. Not bad if you’re short on time.

How to Jailbreak Your iPhone: The Always Up-to-Date Guide [iOS 9]

Jailbreaking is a process that changes little by little with each iOS upgrade. Rather than always publishing new guides, we’re simply going to keep this one up to date. If you want to jailbreak your iOS device, you’ve come to the right page.

Current iOS Version: iOS 9
iOS 9 is jailbroken, with a tool available for Windows only at the moment (when it’s released, the the OS X version will likely work the same way). The jailbreak is compatible with all devices that can run iOS 9, including the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. You’ll find the guide for doing so below.

Not sure if you should jailbreak?

We love jailbreaking our iDevices, but it’s not for everybody. If you’re not sure, you should read both our reasons why jailbreaking is awesome and reasons not to jailbreak—or check out other people’s reasons for both.

How to Jailbreak

Just follow these steps to jailbreak your iDevice, or watch the video above for a demonstration.

  1. Back up your iOS device. Head to Settings > iCloud > Backup and select “Back Up Now”
  2. Disable the passcode on your device. Head to Settings > Touch ID & Passcode and disable the passcode if you’re using one
  3. Enable Airplane Mode: swipe up on your screen to open Control Center and tap the airplane icon
  4. Download Pangu here. This is your jailbreak tool. You’ll also need iTunes, so if you don’t have that, install it now.
  5. Open the Pangu tool once it downloads.
  6. Plug in your iOS device.
  7. When your device is recognized by Pangu, select the “Start” option.
  8. Click “Already Backup”.
  9. After a while, you phone will reboot and Pangu will ask you to put your phone back into Airplane mode. Do that and the software will continue.
  10. A little while later, Pangu will ask you to open the Pangu app on your iPhone’s home screen. Tap the app, and when prompted, give it access to your photos.
  11. You iPhone will reboot one more time. Once you reboot, disable Airplane mode, open up Cydia, and you’re good to go.

Not sure what to install first? Check out our jailbreaking tag page and our quarterly jailbreak roundups for some ideas.

Jailbreaking Options for Older iOS Devices

Music by Chip for Breakfast.

This Video Explains How to Finally Get Rid of Your Bad Breath

Popping a breath mint only masks bad breath—it doesn’t actually solve the problem. If you stink up the vicinity every time you open your mouth, this video will help you find the culprit and fix it for good.

At the end of the day, most bad breath solutions come down to good oral hygiene: brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss regularly (seriously, your dentist isn’t making that up), and scrape your tongue with a tongue scraper. It’s gross, but it’ll do wonders. Get some floss picks with tongue scrapers built-in and kill two birds with one stone. (Or three birds if you floss while you shower).

Check out the video above for more, or check out our original post on the subject if you prefer reading.

How Peel a Head of Garlic in 10 Seconds with Two Bowls

Peeling garlic is kind of a messy endeavor, and it can take a few minutes to peel all that skin off. There’s a much easier way: you can actually peel an entire head in less than 10 seconds—using just a couple of bowls.

There’s always the old tried and true garlic crush-and-peel with a knife, but that only gets you so far. You still have to dig into the (smelly) garlic with your fingers and peel everything off yourself. For one or two cloves, that may be fine, but if you’re using a lot of garlic, try this: throw the crushed head of garlic in a bowl, stick another bowl on top of it, and shake it vigorously. (If it’s being particularly finicky, you may need to microwave it and peel instead).

After a few seconds, you should find that each clove has completely shed its skin and is ready for cooking (or repelling mosquitoes). Just remember to drink a glass of milk to neutralize that garlic breath when you’re finished.

We originally featured this tip in 2011 using this video from Saveur. That video is still great, but we’ve updated this post with our own that shows the process in action, through a glass bowl and a slo-mo camera. Enjoy!

How to Make a Watermelon Vodka Slushy with a Drill and a Wire Hanger

This has to be one of the best summer alcoholic drinks ever. And it’s so fun to make: You just need a watermelon, a vodka bottle, a wire hanger and a drill. Yes, you read that well—a wire hanger and a drill!

  1. Drill a hole in the watermelon.
  2. Snap off a piece of wire hanger.
  3. Attach it to a drill.
  4. Introduce the wire hanger inside the watermelon and power on the drill to blend the inside.
  5. Pour a bottle of vodka through the hole.
  6. Put it in the fridge to cool it (I recommend to give it a few minutes in the freezer).
  7. Cut a spout.
  8. Pour.

Have fun. Lots of it.

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Every few years, a new version of Windows comes out with some decent, but minor upgrades and a $100 price tag. If you’d rather pay $100 for a real boost in features, consider buying these five programs to get a truly new version of Windows.

Blast from the past is a weekly feature at Lifehacker in which we revive old, but still relevant, posts for your reading and hacking pleasure. This post was originally published before the release of Windows 8, but now that Windows 10 is going to be free at launch, it’s the perfect time to put that $100 toward some real software upgrades.

Xplorer2 Pro – $30

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Windows Explorer is simple and easy to use, which is great for beginners—but once you cross the line into power user territory, it really just doesn’t cut it. There are a ton of great alternative file browsers out there, but our favorite is Xplorer 2. It has an advanced, but not difficult-to-use interface that lets you browse with tabs, multiple panes for easy file copying, tons of keyboard shortcuts, and advanced searching (which is the main reason to buy Pro over the free lite version). It’ll also replace Windows Explorer as your default file manager, which is absolutely killer.

If you don’t like Xplorer 2, you can check out some of its competition, like the similarly-priced but somewhat ugly Total Commander, or the much more expensive, but amazing, Directory Opus. Check out our App Directory entry on Xplorer2 for more info on its competition.

Fences Pro – $10

We’ve talked about Fences numerous times before, and there’s a reason for that: there’s just no better way to get your desktop clean and organized. Fences lets you divide up your messy desktop into a number of groups—or "fences"—letting you put newly-downloaded files in one fence, current projects in another fence, and short notes in another. You can double-click on the desktop to hide all your icons when you don’t want to see them, and even give them names.

These basic features are all free, but Fences really gets useful with the $10 pro version. With a pro license, you can have Fences organize your desktop automatically, by putting new files into a certain fence, or grouping them by things like name and file type. You can even fade your fences until they’re moused over, so they’re only 100% visible when you actually work with them. If you actually use your desktop to organize working files, Fences Pro is the perfect app to keep it from getting cluttered.

Bins – $5

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

At a measly $5, there’s no reason not to try Bins. Created by the same developer as Fences, Bins lets you group together icons in your Windows Taskbar, almost like the popular Stacks feature in OS X. It keeps your Taskbar slim, while keeping all your apps at the ready: just is mouse over a group’s icon to get access to the shortcuts within. It also lets you pin files and folders to your taskbar, which is something we’ve all been wishing for forever. Essentially, it does for your taskbar what Fences does for your desktop: it keeps it clean, organized, and much easier to sift through.

Divvy – $14

One of Windows 7′s best new features was Aero Snap, the feature that let you "snap" a window to a screen edge to make it take up half the screen, or to the top of your screen to maximize it. It can get a little annoying, though—sometimes you’re just moving a window and it thinks you want to snap it; other times you wish you had more options over how to divide up your windows. What if you wanted to split your screen 60-40 between two windows instead of 50-50? Or put one window on top and one on the bottom? Divvy lets you do that. With just a hotkey, you can bring up the Divvy grid and tell it exactly where you want the current window to reside. You can even create keyboard shortcuts for different custom layouts, so you can split your screen up into even chunks with just a few keystrokes. If you like Aero Snap but think it could be better, turn it off and use Divvy instead.

DisplayFusion Pro – $25

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Lastly, if you use multiple monitors, DisplayFusion Pro is a must have piece of software (if you only use one monitor, you can probably skip this one). Windows’ multi-monitor support got better in Windows 8, but it’s nowhere near as powerful as DisplayFusion. With it, you can manage your multi-monitor wallpaper, gives you hotkeys to move windows between monitors or change their opacity, adds extra titlebar buttons, more window snapping features (though you won’t need them, since you’ll use Divvy!), and a ton of other stuff. You can get a few of these features with the free version of DisplayFusion, but all the good stuff comes with a $25 pro license, so if you use multiple monitors in your setup, DisplayFusion Pro is absolutely worth the price. It’ll make you feel like your computer was actually meant to have multiple monitors.


Obviously, Windows has a lot of great programs worth paying for—like Trillian Pro, Breevy, or MediaMonkey Gold, but our goal today was to find $100 worth of apps that are so well integrated that they should be part of Windows in the first place. It’s also worth mentioning there are a lot of free apps that fit this category, too like Console2, Launchy, or Dexpot, so check out our App Directory for more Windows essentials. If you have a favorite Windows add-on we didn’t mention, be sure to share it in the comments below.

Title image remixed from clearviewstock, clearviewstock, Shawn Hempel, greglith, Tyler Olson, Masekesam, and Elle Arden Images (all Shutterstock).

Video music by Russel Reynolds.

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Every few years, a new version of Windows comes out with some decent, but minor upgrades and a $100 price tag. If you’d rather pay $100 for a real boost in features, consider buying these five programs to get a truly new version of Windows.

Blast from the past is a weekly feature at Lifehacker in which we revive old, but still relevant, posts for your reading and hacking pleasure. This post was originally published before the release of Windows 8, but now that Windows 10 is going to be free at launch, it’s the perfect time to put that $100 toward some real software upgrades.

Xplorer2 Pro – $30

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Windows Explorer is simple and easy to use, which is great for beginners—but once you cross the line into power user territory, it really just doesn’t cut it. There are a ton of great alternative file browsers out there, but our favorite is Xplorer 2. It has an advanced, but not difficult-to-use interface that lets you browse with tabs, multiple panes for easy file copying, tons of keyboard shortcuts, and advanced searching (which is the main reason to buy Pro over the free lite version). It’ll also replace Windows Explorer as your default file manager, which is absolutely killer.

If you don’t like Xplorer 2, you can check out some of its competition, like the similarly-priced but somewhat ugly Total Commander, or the much more expensive, but amazing, Directory Opus. Check out our App Directory entry on Xplorer2 for more info on its competition.

Fences Pro – $10

We’ve talked about Fences numerous times before, and there’s a reason for that: there’s just no better way to get your desktop clean and organized. Fences lets you divide up your messy desktop into a number of groups—or "fences"—letting you put newly-downloaded files in one fence, current projects in another fence, and short notes in another. You can double-click on the desktop to hide all your icons when you don’t want to see them, and even give them names.

These basic features are all free, but Fences really gets useful with the $10 pro version. With a pro license, you can have Fences organize your desktop automatically, by putting new files into a certain fence, or grouping them by things like name and file type. You can even fade your fences until they’re moused over, so they’re only 100% visible when you actually work with them. If you actually use your desktop to organize working files, Fences Pro is the perfect app to keep it from getting cluttered.

Bins – $5

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

At a measly $5, there’s no reason not to try Bins. Created by the same developer as Fences, Bins lets you group together icons in your Windows Taskbar, almost like the popular Stacks feature in OS X. It keeps your Taskbar slim, while keeping all your apps at the ready: just is mouse over a group’s icon to get access to the shortcuts within. It also lets you pin files and folders to your taskbar, which is something we’ve all been wishing for forever. Essentially, it does for your taskbar what Fences does for your desktop: it keeps it clean, organized, and much easier to sift through.

Divvy – $14

One of Windows 7′s best new features was Aero Snap, the feature that let you "snap" a window to a screen edge to make it take up half the screen, or to the top of your screen to maximize it. It can get a little annoying, though—sometimes you’re just moving a window and it thinks you want to snap it; other times you wish you had more options over how to divide up your windows. What if you wanted to split your screen 60-40 between two windows instead of 50-50? Or put one window on top and one on the bottom? Divvy lets you do that. With just a hotkey, you can bring up the Divvy grid and tell it exactly where you want the current window to reside. You can even create keyboard shortcuts for different custom layouts, so you can split your screen up into even chunks with just a few keystrokes. If you like Aero Snap but think it could be better, turn it off and use Divvy instead.

DisplayFusion Pro – $25

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Lastly, if you use multiple monitors, DisplayFusion Pro is a must have piece of software (if you only use one monitor, you can probably skip this one). Windows’ multi-monitor support got better in Windows 8, but it’s nowhere near as powerful as DisplayFusion. With it, you can manage your multi-monitor wallpaper, gives you hotkeys to move windows between monitors or change their opacity, adds extra titlebar buttons, more window snapping features (though you won’t need them, since you’ll use Divvy!), and a ton of other stuff. You can get a few of these features with the free version of DisplayFusion, but all the good stuff comes with a $25 pro license, so if you use multiple monitors in your setup, DisplayFusion Pro is absolutely worth the price. It’ll make you feel like your computer was actually meant to have multiple monitors.


Obviously, Windows has a lot of great programs worth paying for—like Trillian Pro, Breevy, or MediaMonkey Gold, but our goal today was to find $100 worth of apps that are so well integrated that they should be part of Windows in the first place. It’s also worth mentioning there are a lot of free apps that fit this category, too like Console2, Launchy, or Dexpot, so check out our App Directory for more Windows essentials. If you have a favorite Windows add-on we didn’t mention, be sure to share it in the comments below.

Title image remixed from clearviewstock, clearviewstock, Shawn Hempel, greglith, Tyler Olson, Masekesam, and Elle Arden Images (all Shutterstock).

Video music by Russel Reynolds.

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Every few years, a new version of Windows comes out with some decent, but minor upgrades and a $100 price tag. If you’d rather pay $100 for a real boost in features, consider buying these five programs to get a truly new version of Windows.

Blast from the past is a weekly feature at Lifehacker in which we revive old, but still relevant, posts for your reading and hacking pleasure. This post was originally published before the release of Windows 8, but now that Windows 10 is going to be free at launch, it’s the perfect time to put that $100 toward some real software upgrades.

Xplorer2 Pro – $30

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Windows Explorer is simple and easy to use, which is great for beginners—but once you cross the line into power user territory, it really just doesn’t cut it. There are a ton of great alternative file browsers out there, but our favorite is Xplorer 2. It has an advanced, but not difficult-to-use interface that lets you browse with tabs, multiple panes for easy file copying, tons of keyboard shortcuts, and advanced searching (which is the main reason to buy Pro over the free lite version). It’ll also replace Windows Explorer as your default file manager, which is absolutely killer.

If you don’t like Xplorer 2, you can check out some of its competition, like the similarly-priced but somewhat ugly Total Commander, or the much more expensive, but amazing, Directory Opus. Check out our App Directory entry on Xplorer2 for more info on its competition.

Fences Pro – $10

We’ve talked about Fences numerous times before, and there’s a reason for that: there’s just no better way to get your desktop clean and organized. Fences lets you divide up your messy desktop into a number of groups—or "fences"—letting you put newly-downloaded files in one fence, current projects in another fence, and short notes in another. You can double-click on the desktop to hide all your icons when you don’t want to see them, and even give them names.

These basic features are all free, but Fences really gets useful with the $10 pro version. With a pro license, you can have Fences organize your desktop automatically, by putting new files into a certain fence, or grouping them by things like name and file type. You can even fade your fences until they’re moused over, so they’re only 100% visible when you actually work with them. If you actually use your desktop to organize working files, Fences Pro is the perfect app to keep it from getting cluttered.

Bins – $5

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

At a measly $5, there’s no reason not to try Bins. Created by the same developer as Fences, Bins lets you group together icons in your Windows Taskbar, almost like the popular Stacks feature in OS X. It keeps your Taskbar slim, while keeping all your apps at the ready: just is mouse over a group’s icon to get access to the shortcuts within. It also lets you pin files and folders to your taskbar, which is something we’ve all been wishing for forever. Essentially, it does for your taskbar what Fences does for your desktop: it keeps it clean, organized, and much easier to sift through.

Divvy – $14

One of Windows 7′s best new features was Aero Snap, the feature that let you "snap" a window to a screen edge to make it take up half the screen, or to the top of your screen to maximize it. It can get a little annoying, though—sometimes you’re just moving a window and it thinks you want to snap it; other times you wish you had more options over how to divide up your windows. What if you wanted to split your screen 60-40 between two windows instead of 50-50? Or put one window on top and one on the bottom? Divvy lets you do that. With just a hotkey, you can bring up the Divvy grid and tell it exactly where you want the current window to reside. You can even create keyboard shortcuts for different custom layouts, so you can split your screen up into even chunks with just a few keystrokes. If you like Aero Snap but think it could be better, turn it off and use Divvy instead.

DisplayFusion Pro – $25

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Lastly, if you use multiple monitors, DisplayFusion Pro is a must have piece of software (if you only use one monitor, you can probably skip this one). Windows’ multi-monitor support got better in Windows 8, but it’s nowhere near as powerful as DisplayFusion. With it, you can manage your multi-monitor wallpaper, gives you hotkeys to move windows between monitors or change their opacity, adds extra titlebar buttons, more window snapping features (though you won’t need them, since you’ll use Divvy!), and a ton of other stuff. You can get a few of these features with the free version of DisplayFusion, but all the good stuff comes with a $25 pro license, so if you use multiple monitors in your setup, DisplayFusion Pro is absolutely worth the price. It’ll make you feel like your computer was actually meant to have multiple monitors.


Obviously, Windows has a lot of great programs worth paying for—like Trillian Pro, Breevy, or MediaMonkey Gold, but our goal today was to find $100 worth of apps that are so well integrated that they should be part of Windows in the first place. It’s also worth mentioning there are a lot of free apps that fit this category, too like Console2, Launchy, or Dexpot, so check out our App Directory for more Windows essentials. If you have a favorite Windows add-on we didn’t mention, be sure to share it in the comments below.

Title image remixed from clearviewstock, clearviewstock, Shawn Hempel, greglith, Tyler Olson, Masekesam, and Elle Arden Images (all Shutterstock).

Video music by Russel Reynolds.

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Every few years, a new version of Windows comes out with some decent, but minor upgrades and a $100 price tag. If you’d rather pay $100 for a real boost in features, consider buying these five programs to get a truly new version of Windows.

Blast from the past is a weekly feature at Lifehacker in which we revive old, but still relevant, posts for your reading and hacking pleasure. This post was originally published before the release of Windows 8, but now that Windows 10 is going to be free at launch, it’s the perfect time to put that $100 toward some real software upgrades.

Xplorer2 Pro – $30

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Windows Explorer is simple and easy to use, which is great for beginners—but once you cross the line into power user territory, it really just doesn’t cut it. There are a ton of great alternative file browsers out there, but our favorite is Xplorer 2. It has an advanced, but not difficult-to-use interface that lets you browse with tabs, multiple panes for easy file copying, tons of keyboard shortcuts, and advanced searching (which is the main reason to buy Pro over the free lite version). It’ll also replace Windows Explorer as your default file manager, which is absolutely killer.

If you don’t like Xplorer 2, you can check out some of its competition, like the similarly-priced but somewhat ugly Total Commander, or the much more expensive, but amazing, Directory Opus. Check out our App Directory entry on Xplorer2 for more info on its competition.

Fences Pro – $10

We’ve talked about Fences numerous times before, and there’s a reason for that: there’s just no better way to get your desktop clean and organized. Fences lets you divide up your messy desktop into a number of groups—or "fences"—letting you put newly-downloaded files in one fence, current projects in another fence, and short notes in another. You can double-click on the desktop to hide all your icons when you don’t want to see them, and even give them names.

These basic features are all free, but Fences really gets useful with the $10 pro version. With a pro license, you can have Fences organize your desktop automatically, by putting new files into a certain fence, or grouping them by things like name and file type. You can even fade your fences until they’re moused over, so they’re only 100% visible when you actually work with them. If you actually use your desktop to organize working files, Fences Pro is the perfect app to keep it from getting cluttered.

Bins – $5

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

At a measly $5, there’s no reason not to try Bins. Created by the same developer as Fences, Bins lets you group together icons in your Windows Taskbar, almost like the popular Stacks feature in OS X. It keeps your Taskbar slim, while keeping all your apps at the ready: just is mouse over a group’s icon to get access to the shortcuts within. It also lets you pin files and folders to your taskbar, which is something we’ve all been wishing for forever. Essentially, it does for your taskbar what Fences does for your desktop: it keeps it clean, organized, and much easier to sift through.

Divvy – $14

One of Windows 7′s best new features was Aero Snap, the feature that let you "snap" a window to a screen edge to make it take up half the screen, or to the top of your screen to maximize it. It can get a little annoying, though—sometimes you’re just moving a window and it thinks you want to snap it; other times you wish you had more options over how to divide up your windows. What if you wanted to split your screen 60-40 between two windows instead of 50-50? Or put one window on top and one on the bottom? Divvy lets you do that. With just a hotkey, you can bring up the Divvy grid and tell it exactly where you want the current window to reside. You can even create keyboard shortcuts for different custom layouts, so you can split your screen up into even chunks with just a few keystrokes. If you like Aero Snap but think it could be better, turn it off and use Divvy instead.

DisplayFusion Pro – $25

A Better $100 Upgrade: Five Paid Programs that Improve Windows Now

Lastly, if you use multiple monitors, DisplayFusion Pro is a must have piece of software (if you only use one monitor, you can probably skip this one). Windows’ multi-monitor support got better in Windows 8, but it’s nowhere near as powerful as DisplayFusion. With it, you can manage your multi-monitor wallpaper, gives you hotkeys to move windows between monitors or change their opacity, adds extra titlebar buttons, more window snapping features (though you won’t need them, since you’ll use Divvy!), and a ton of other stuff. You can get a few of these features with the free version of DisplayFusion, but all the good stuff comes with a $25 pro license, so if you use multiple monitors in your setup, DisplayFusion Pro is absolutely worth the price. It’ll make you feel like your computer was actually meant to have multiple monitors.


Obviously, Windows has a lot of great programs worth paying for—like Trillian Pro, Breevy, or MediaMonkey Gold, but our goal today was to find $100 worth of apps that are so well integrated that they should be part of Windows in the first place. It’s also worth mentioning there are a lot of free apps that fit this category, too like Console2, Launchy, or Dexpot, so check out our App Directory for more Windows essentials. If you have a favorite Windows add-on we didn’t mention, be sure to share it in the comments below.

Title image remixed from clearviewstock, clearviewstock, Shawn Hempel, greglith, Tyler Olson, Masekesam, and Elle Arden Images (all Shutterstock).

Video music by Russel Reynolds.