Tag Archives: Mice

Make a No-Kill Mouse Trap With a Soda Bottle

If you find yourself with an uninvited mouse guest and want a humane solution to catch the critter, you can easily make a non-lethal trap with just a soda bottle mounted on a pivot.

DIY tinkerer Chris Notap shows us how it’s done on YouTube. It’s a very clever solution in its simplicity, and it’s also infinitely reusable for those recurring rodent visits. You’ll notice from his instructions that it’s particularly important you correctly place the pivot so that the bottle’s mouth is just barely raised but tilts once the mouse goes in. Where you release the critter is up to you.

How to Make a Simple 2L Humane Mousetrap via BoingBoing

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too

PC gaming gear can be fun, and even help you be more productive, but it’s rare to find ones designed to be customizable and high-performance for gaming but equally useful when it’s time to get things done. Das Keyboard’s new gaming line, Division Zero, manages both, with some caveats.

The Lineup

Division Zero is Das Keyboard’s first foray into gaming peripherals, a market already saturated by big names and popular brands. That doesn’t mean they didn’t bring solid gear to the table, but it does mean you have to weigh it against some well-known competition. Here’s the lineup:

  • The X40 Pro gaming keyboard ($149) is a low-rise, metal mechanical keyboard fitted with custom “Alpha-Zulu” switches. It features changeable aluminum top plates to customize the look of the keyboard, and red LED backlighting behind the keys turns itself off when idle. There’s a spare USB 2.0 port, and audio passthrough so you can plug in a microphone and headphones—which means you also have analog audio cables to plug into your PC, but you don’t have to use them.
  • The M50 Pro gaming mouse ($79) features an ambidextrous design, a 6400 DPI laser sensor, on the fly DPI control settings, and nine programmable macro buttons. It also features on-board memory to remember those macros and your per-application (or per-game) profiles, and a tilt-scroll wheel with multiple degrees of motion side-to-side.
  • The 47W Surface is Das’s flexible mousepad, designed for use with the M50, comes in three flavors, the Flex ($19), Control ($19), and Speed ($29). Das sent us the Control version, and it works beautifully with other mice as well as the M50. It’s a textured mousepad, thinner than a sheet of paper but even more flexible, and features a grippy underside that makes sure it won’t move, no matter how hard you move your mouse.

All in all, their prices are on par with other PC gaming peripherals: Pricey. If you’re rocking the keyboard and mouse that came with your PC, these aren’t for you. However, if you love features like programmable macro buttons, LED backlighting, customizable profiles, and sharp, enthusiast-focused design, then it’s nothing you’re not used to. If you’re a mechanical keyboard enthusiast, well. You’re definitely used to playing this much for a keyboard.

Where They Excel

After using all three, it’s safe to say they shine both for gaming and for getting work done, which is exactly how I prefer my peripherals. I want them to pull double duty on my desk, and for the amount of money you’d spend, you probably would too. They’re not perfect though, and have some glaring drawbacks that should make you think before pulling out your wallet. Let’s break them down into three big categories: build quality, customization, and usability, with special attention to those fancy custom switches.

Build Quality

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too
A mess of cables, but all braided, fabric-wrapped, and with their own velcro for easy management.

Both the X40 and the M50 are sturdy and feel like you could put them through a long gaming session or an arduous workday. That’s exactly what I did, since my work and gaming are in the same physical place. I wound up using the X40 and the M50 for work all day writing, and I would swap them over to my gaming PC for a few hours of blissful, cathartic destruction, puzzle solving, and exploration. The X40′s aluminum build and heavy body served it a little better than the M50′s mostly plastic (but still heavy) build. The braided cloth cables on both are great for keeping dust away and avoiding tangles, and the cords are nice and long with velcro wraps to keep the slack managed.

http://lifehacker.com/the-logitech-m…

The M50 is a quality ambidextrous gaming mouse, which is nice to see. I found the scroll wheel really stiff and tough use (especially compared to the Logitech MX Master I use for work and the Logitech Proteus Core I use for gaming) but it loosened up over time (or maybe I just got used to it.) The 47W is grippy and won’t move or slide around even a smooth desk surface (like mine), and is large and nicely sized.

Customization and Key Macros

If you’re going to spend this much on gear, you may as well get the most possible use out of their customization features. The programmable macro keys work with third-party tools like AutoHotkey, which we’ve shown you how to use with your gaming gear, by the way, just as well as Das Keyboard’s own software.

http://lifehacker.com/why-i-started-…

In Windows, all you need to do is press Fn + F12 to enable macro recording. Making the special buttons on the X40 and the M50 do whatever you want them to do, whether it’s an Excel macro or a spell rotation, is easy. If you prefer to use AutoHotKey or another utility, it’s just as simple—just tap the button you’d like to assign the action to, program it, and away you go. You can easily turn the five programmable keys on the left side of the X40 into web browsing actions or music controls (technically there are function keys for that, although I miss the Das Keyboard 4′s hardware audio controls and volume knob) and then switch them out for weapon loadouts in your favorite shooter or attack rotations in an MMO.

The other big customization feature on the X40 is one that’ll cost you money: aluminum top panels for your keyboard. Das sent us two to switch out with the default aluminum silver: the “Defamer” in mustard, and the “Stryker” in red. Both have subtly different designs, and there’s also a Defamer in silver and a Stryker in olive green if you prefer those colors. Each additional panel will set you back $39, which is a lot, but if a fresh top panel will give you that fresh-keyboard-feeling without actually buying a new keyboard, we say go for it and swap them out when the mood strikes.

Usability

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too
Each keyboard proudly displays the switch you chose. Linear is off-white, tactile is green.

Speaking of the keys on the X40, we discuss those new Alpha-Zulu mechanical switches that Das is so proud of. The switches come in “linear” and “tactile,” both offering the same 1.7mm travel distance and 45g actuation force, but the difference is how the two feel. The linear switches aren’t tactile or clicky, and the tactile ones still aren’t clicky, but they do require a little extra force to engage the key halfway through the travel distance. What that all means for you is that the “tactile” ones are for gamers used to half-pressing their keys and then engaging them fully at just the right time, while the linear ones are for people who hold those keys down and rely on long-presses. I tested the linear switches.

The switches are great, but they’re not perfect. They’re quiet but satisfying, and give you the depth and key traversal you want from a mechanical, but without the audible “clack-clack” that often comes with. However, if you’re a Cherry MX lover and you love that audible click, you’ll miss it. If you use the linear model and miss feeling the actuation point, you’ll miss that too.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-…

When I switched between the X40 and my trusty Corsair K70 with Cherry MX Red keys, I definitely missed the sound, but after even a few days I was more than used to the quieter profile. (Which was especially nice, since the linear switches are similar to the MX Red.) They won’t drive you or anyone else nearby nuts while you work, and they’re still fun to play on.

Where They Fall Short

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too
Even in low light, the keyboard is somewhat weak, but the mouse pulses brightly.

Division Zero line has its strengths, but it also has weaknesses. We wouldn’t be writing about it if we thought it sucked, but there are some things you should pay attention to if you’re thinking about buying.

  • The LED backlighting is weak, and not just brightness-wise. The mouse’s LED is bright and strong, but the keyboard’s LED backlighting is dimmer and nothing to write home about. It’s decent, but it’s all red, and in an age of RGB keyboards, it’s a bit of a bummer that you can’t customize the colors (especially at this price.) Plus, it’s not per-key backlighting, so keep that in mind. That all said, it looks nice behind the aluminum backplates, but consider that you can get more customization, colors, and brighter LEDs for less.
  • The price. Das’ Division Zero line is new, and as with all PC peripherals, they’re more expensive today than they’ll ever be. The X40 is $149, the M50 is $79, and the custom faceplates are $39 each. That’s a lot of money, especially considering most of the keyboards the X40 is competing with, like the Razer Deathstalker, the Rosewill RK-9000, and some other entry level mechanicals are all closer to $99. Similar mice to the M50, like the Logitech Proteus Core and the Razer Deathadder, are both slightly cheaper, closer to $70. It’s a tough sell, but expect to see prices come down as Amazon and other retailers get their hands on these and start competing for business.
  • The keyboard’s single USB 2.0 port and extra cables. This is a bit of a nitpick for me, but since I generally don’t use audio passthrough on a keyboard, the analog audio cables on the X40 were just wasted space, velcroed together on top of my desk. It’s a nice feature to have, but I just don’t know many people buying a keyboard wishing they could plug their headset into it. I would have much rather had a second USB port right next to it, get hardware audio and volume controls, or have that port be USB 3.0 instead of 2.0.

These drawbacks may be dealbreakers for some of you—especially the price. If you don’t mind splurging, or you’ll use yours for gaming and for work, then they may be a good buy, especially when compared to its more popular—and in some cases more affordable—competition.

The Bottom Line: Pricey, but Sturdy, Sharp, and Fun to Use

Das Keyboard’s Division Zero Is Gaming Gear that Makes Work Fun Too
The “Defamer” keyboard cover, which includes the wrench required to swap top plates.

So that leaves us with the big question: Should you buy these? Well, we can definitely recommend the 47W mousepad and the X40 keyboard. The M50 is a little trickier to tell you to buy.

The mousepad is huge and grippy, and will probably stay on my desk long after the M50 makes its exit in favor of the less-ambidextrous but smoother-to-use Proteus Core, which is still my favorite mouse for gaming right now, and I’ll probably continue to use my MX Master for work. In short, the M50 is great, and great for lefties or people who just prefer an ambidextrous mouse, but it’s stiff, a little heavy, and while it glides across your desk easily enough and has all the right DPI settings, I still felt myself missing the button layout of the Proteus Core, and if I had to run out and choose one from a store shelf, the Proteus Core is cheaper.

Getting back to the 47W control surface though: You’ll have to choose the surface you think is best for you. I liked the Control surface a lot, and the price there is about right for a “gaming” mousepad, if that’s what you want. If you don’t though, well, it’s an easy one to skip.

The X40 is a bigger deal though. I liked it, enough to push over my Corsair K70 sometimes. I like the idea of the changeable top plates, but I’m also a sucker for customization like that. Little ways to make something you own feel brand new are a great way to spend a little where you could have spent a lot. However, the X40 is definitely missing things I miss from other keyboards. And like the others here, it’s pricey. Even so, it’s fun to use, great to type on and play on, and it’s the first keyboard in a while that I enjoyed writing on as much as I enjoyed gaming on. If you can try it before you buy, definitely do, and make your own decision, but I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Once upon a time, Logitech’s MX Revolution was the most popular mouse around, and with good reason: It was comfortable, customizable, and its “momentum scrolling” is a lifesaver. Now, it has three successors, all of which are a bit different: The Performance MX, the new and powerful MX Master, and the gaming-focused G502 Proteus Core. Here’s how they compare.

http://lifehacker.com/5865351/how-to…

The Contenders

Logitech has a huge product line, but when it comes down to their best stuff, these three take the cake:

  • The Logitech Performance Mouse MX ($50 at Amazon) was the first successor the the MX Revolution, and retains most of its best features. It’s been so popular that Logitech has been producing it, unchanged, for six years.
  • The Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($92 at Amazon) is the latest entry in the MX line, and the successor to the Performance MX. Featuring an updated design, battery, and some new features, it’s the mouse Logitech wants you to move to when your Performance MX finally dies.
  • The Logitech G502 Proteus Core Gaming Mouse ($76 at Amazon) isn’t technically in the MX line, but it’s so similar you’d think it was. It boasts most of the same buttons and features as the Performance MX and even feels similar in your hand, albeit with a more “gamer”-focused aesthetic and software.

It’s worth noting up front that all of these mice are, sadly, for right-handers only. Logitech does have a few left-handed and ambidextrous mice, but the three kings are made for right-handed folks.

The mice have more similarities than differences, but if you’re having a hard time deciding which to buy, we’ve got you covered.

Look and Feel

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX (left) feels like it was made to fit in your hand. It’s perfect for palm grippers who like to rest their whole hand on the mouse. Even if you have smaller hands, this larger mouse will fit them well.

The MX Master (center) is a little taller than the Performance MX, and it’s also a palm gripper’s mouse, even though it feels good in the hand regardless of grip. Logitech definitely wants you to use this mouse in a specific way, and you’ll know it as soon as you put your hand on it. The MX’s smooth curves are replaced with modern angles, which take up a little less space while still comfortable to use. It’s also a little heavier than the MX, but it shares the same footprint on your desk.

The Proteus Core (right) is similar in size to the Performance MX, but with a distinct “gaming” look: hard edges, LED lights, and a blue accent along the side. It also comes with a set of weights in the bottom that you can move or reconfigure to make the mouse heavier, lighter, or move weight to different sides of the mouse. This is really nice, since it essentially lets you customize the weight and feel of the mouse to your desires.

The Buttons

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is pretty basic in terms of buttons, but has all the ones that count. It has a left and right click, a scroll wheel that moves up and down and side to side, and back and forward buttons on the side. It also has a hidden “Thumb” button that’s perfect for Task View in Windows or Mission Control/Exposé in OS X. There’s also a very tiny “Zoom” button. All of the buttons are programmable through Logitech’s software.

The MX Master has all of the same buttons the Performance MX boasts, with a few improvements. The button under the thumb-rest is gesture sensitive now, and can do things like maximize windows or snap left or right in Windows, or toggle Mission Control and Exposé in OS X. One of the best things about the MX Master is the return of the thumbwheel from the MX Revolution, the Performance MX’s older brother. It’s perfect for swiping through documents and scrolling through spreadsheets. The back and forward buttons rest directly behind it. Depending on your hand, the thumbwheel and buttons are comfortable and easy to get to, or you have to pull your hand back a bit to get your thumb on them. For me, they’re perfectly placed.

The Proteus Core adds a few buttons to the MX layout, but not too many. In fact, it only has three more than the Performance MX. It has back and forward buttons, just like the MX mice, and a thumb button meant for sniping in games (which is just a tad harder to reach than the MX’s thumb buttons). However, unlike the MX mice, it also has two DPI buttons and a “G9” button that comes unprogrammed. All of the buttons are customizable through Logitech’s software.

Wired vs. Wireless

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is only available as a wireless mouse. You can technically plug it in with a USB cable, but you’ll still need the wireless receiver plugged in as well. If you prefer wireless mice, you’ll be happy with it, but it can also be a con—after all, you have to worry about charging it, and I’ve found that lots of wireless mice have had problems with power or connection later on in life.

The MX Master is also wireless, but it adds Bluetooth support to the mix. It can also charge and operate simultaneously while plugged in via USB, but you won’t need to keep it plugged in for long—Logitech boasts you can get a whole day’s worth of charge in four minutes of charging, and I’ve found that to be true. It’s also worth noting that the MX Master can also “connect” to up the three devices at once, via Unifying Receiver or Bluetooth. To switch active devices, just press a button on the underside of the mouse. This makes it ideal for keeping one mouse at home (or at work and at home) that you use to control multiple PCs.

The Proteus Core, on the other hand, only comes as a wired mouse. I was very happy with it though; it has a nice long braided cable that doesn’t feel like it tugs or snags the mouse in any way. After decades of hating wired mice, the Proteus Core has converted me.

Note that the Logitech G602, while not a direct alternative to the Proteus Core, is a somewhat similar mouse that comes in wireless.

Software and Customization

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX and MX Master use Logitech’s boringly-named “Logitech Options” software, which allows you to customize pointer and scrolling speed, smooth scrolling, the mode of the scroll wheel (free spinning or ratcheting), and even the default direction apps scroll when you move the thumb or scroll wheel (for those of you who for some reason want scrolling the wheel down to mean page up). You also get the usual button customization options, so you can re-map each of the Performance MX and MX Master’s buttons to virtually anything you like—even keystrokes or system features, like opening Launchpad on the Mac or the Start Menu in Windows.

Beyond button programming, scrolling options, and pointer sensitivity though, that’s about it. Logitech Options is barebones otherwise, and while you can use it to manage multiple Logitech mice, you can’t record complex macros, set different “profiles” for work and home, or work and play, and you can’t save those profiles to the mouse—they’re stored on your PC, locally.

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Proteus Core uses a slightly different program called “Logitech Gaming Software”, which is significantly more powerful. Logitech’s gaming software lets you program buttons to functions and keystrokes just like Logitech Options, but also lets you record complex macros with the click of a button. It can also store profiles on the mouse itself (rather than on your computer), “tune” the mouse to your mousepad or desk’s surface, analyze how often you press certain buttons, and turn on “angle snapping” for straighter lines. All of these features turn the Proteus core into a pretty killer productivity tool, even if they were meant for gaming.

http://lifehacker.com/why-i-started-…

Other Extra Features

The Performance MX and Proteus Core have my all-time favorite mouse feature: momentum scrolling. The wheel scrolls normally, like any other mouse, with a series of clicks that scrolls a certain number of lines. However, with the press of a button under the wheel, it switches to a free-spinning mode. Flick it, and it’ll continue spinning at breakneck speeds until you stop it, which is awesome for scrolling back to the top of large web pages or documents. I can’t live without this feature in a mouse. (Check out the video above at the :37 second mark to see it in action.)

The MX Master made this feature even better by introducing auto-detect for scrolling. Yes, you can still manually toggle momentum scrolling on and off with the button under the scroll wheel, but now if you scroll hard enough and let go, the MX Master automatically switches to momentum scrolling mode. When the scroll wheel slows down, it’ll click back into manual scrolling mode. It’s the best of both worlds without having to change your habits at all.

All Three Mice Are Champions

This isn’t the kind of showdown where there’s really a “winner”—all three mice are great, and it’s pretty hard to go wrong with any of them. The Performance MX and Proteus Core are surprisingly similar in terms of functionality, and the biggest deciding factor between the two is the kind of look you want, whether you prefer wired or wireless, and your budget. (Though the Proteus Core’s extra buttons, more powerful software, and customizable weights do give it a small edge—with an increase in price to match.)

The MX Master, on the other hand, is a fitting upgrade to the Performance MX, but it’s a pricey one. It’s definitely more feature-packed, but whether those features are ones that matter to you is another story. When you look at the MX, consider whether you need Bluetooth or the option to use the mouse with multiple PCs. If the Performance MX was your perfect mouse, you might not feel like you need the MX Master’s new features—but they’re really nice when you have them, and once you do, you’ll definitely rely on them.

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Once upon a time, Logitech’s MX Revolution was the most popular mouse around, and with good reason: It was comfortable, customizable, and its “momentum scrolling” is a lifesaver. Now, it has three successors, all of which are a bit different: The Performance MX, the new and powerful MX Master, and the gaming-focused G502 Proteus Core. Here’s how they compare.

http://lifehacker.com/5865351/how-to…

The Contenders

Logitech has a huge product line, but when it comes down to their best stuff, these three take the cake:

  • The Logitech Performance Mouse MX ($50 at Amazon) was the first successor the the MX Revolution, and retains most of its best features. It’s been so popular that Logitech has been producing it, unchanged, for six years.
  • The Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($92 at Amazon) is the latest entry in the MX line, and the successor to the Performance MX. Featuring an updated design, battery, and some new features, it’s the mouse Logitech wants you to move to when your Performance MX finally dies.
  • The Logitech G502 Proteus Core Gaming Mouse ($76 at Amazon) isn’t technically in the MX line, but it’s so similar you’d think it was. It boasts most of the same buttons and features as the Performance MX and even feels similar in your hand, albeit with a more “gamer”-focused aesthetic and software.

It’s worth noting up front that all of these mice are, sadly, for right-handers only. Logitech does have a few left-handed and ambidextrous mice, but the three kings are made for right-handed folks.

The mice have more similarities than differences, but if you’re having a hard time deciding which to buy, we’ve got you covered.

Look and Feel

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX (left) feels like it was made to fit in your hand. It’s perfect for palm grippers who like to rest their whole hand on the mouse. Even if you have smaller hands, this larger mouse will fit them well.

The MX Master (center) is a little taller than the Performance MX, and it’s also a palm gripper’s mouse, even though it feels good in the hand regardless of grip. Logitech definitely wants you to use this mouse in a specific way, and you’ll know it as soon as you put your hand on it. The MX’s smooth curves are replaced with modern angles, which take up a little less space while still comfortable to use. It’s also a little heavier than the MX, but it shares the same footprint on your desk.

The Proteus Core (right) is similar in size to the Performance MX, but with a distinct “gaming” look: hard edges, LED lights, and a blue accent along the side. It also comes with a set of weights in the bottom that you can move or reconfigure to make the mouse heavier, lighter, or move weight to different sides of the mouse. This is really nice, since it essentially lets you customize the weight and feel of the mouse to your desires.

The Buttons

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is pretty basic in terms of buttons, but has all the ones that count. It has a left and right click, a scroll wheel that moves up and down and side to side, and back and forward buttons on the side. It also has a hidden “Thumb” button that’s perfect for Task View in Windows or Mission Control/Exposé in OS X. There’s also a very tiny “Zoom” button. All of the buttons are programmable through Logitech’s software.

The MX Master has all of the same buttons the Performance MX boasts, with a few improvements. The button under the thumb-rest is gesture sensitive now, and can do things like maximize windows or snap left or right in Windows, or toggle Mission Control and Exposé in OS X. One of the best things about the MX Master is the return of the thumbwheel from the MX Revolution, the Performance MX’s older brother. It’s perfect for swiping through documents and scrolling through spreadsheets. The back and forward buttons rest directly behind it. Depending on your hand, the thumbwheel and buttons are comfortable and easy to get to, or you have to pull your hand back a bit to get your thumb on them. For me, they’re perfectly placed.

The Proteus Core adds a few buttons to the MX layout, but not too many. In fact, it only has three more than the Performance MX. It has back and forward buttons, just like the MX mice, and a thumb button meant for sniping in games (which is just a tad harder to reach than the MX’s thumb buttons). However, unlike the MX mice, it also has two DPI buttons and a “G9” button that comes unprogrammed. All of the buttons are customizable through Logitech’s software.

Wired vs. Wireless

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is only available as a wireless mouse. You can technically plug it in with a USB cable, but you’ll still need the wireless receiver plugged in as well. If you prefer wireless mice, you’ll be happy with it, but it can also be a con—after all, you have to worry about charging it, and I’ve found that lots of wireless mice have had problems with power or connection later on in life.

The MX Master is also wireless, but it adds Bluetooth support to the mix. It can also charge and operate simultaneously while plugged in via USB, but you won’t need to keep it plugged in for long—Logitech boasts you can get a whole day’s worth of charge in four minutes of charging, and I’ve found that to be true. It’s also worth noting that the MX Master can also “connect” to up the three devices at once, via Unifying Receiver or Bluetooth. To switch active devices, just press a button on the underside of the mouse. This makes it ideal for keeping one mouse at home (or at work and at home) that you use to control multiple PCs.

The Proteus Core, on the other hand, only comes as a wired mouse. I was very happy with it though; it has a nice long braided cable that doesn’t feel like it tugs or snags the mouse in any way. After decades of hating wired mice, the Proteus Core has converted me.

Note that the Logitech G602, while not a direct alternative to the Proteus Core, is a somewhat similar mouse that comes in wireless.

Software and Customization

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX and MX Master use Logitech’s boringly-named “Logitech Options” software, which allows you to customize pointer and scrolling speed, smooth scrolling, the mode of the scroll wheel (free spinning or ratcheting), and even the default direction apps scroll when you move the thumb or scroll wheel (for those of you who for some reason want scrolling the wheel down to mean page up). You also get the usual button customization options, so you can re-map each of the Performance MX and MX Master’s buttons to virtually anything you like—even keystrokes or system features, like opening Launchpad on the Mac or the Start Menu in Windows.

Beyond button programming, scrolling options, and pointer sensitivity though, that’s about it. Logitech Options is barebones otherwise, and while you can use it to manage multiple Logitech mice, you can’t record complex macros, set different “profiles” for work and home, or work and play, and you can’t save those profiles to the mouse—they’re stored on your PC, locally.

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Proteus Core uses a slightly different program called “Logitech Gaming Software”, which is significantly more powerful. Logitech’s gaming software lets you program buttons to functions and keystrokes just like Logitech Options, but also lets you record complex macros with the click of a button. It can also store profiles on the mouse itself (rather than on your computer), “tune” the mouse to your mousepad or desk’s surface, analyze how often you press certain buttons, and turn on “angle snapping” for straighter lines. All of these features turn the Proteus core into a pretty killer productivity tool, even if they were meant for gaming.

http://lifehacker.com/why-i-started-…

Other Extra Features

The Performance MX and Proteus Core have my all-time favorite mouse feature: momentum scrolling. The wheel scrolls normally, like any other mouse, with a series of clicks that scrolls a certain number of lines. However, with the press of a button under the wheel, it switches to a free-spinning mode. Flick it, and it’ll continue spinning at breakneck speeds until you stop it, which is awesome for scrolling back to the top of large web pages or documents. I can’t live without this feature in a mouse. (Check out the video above at the :37 second mark to see it in action.)

The MX Master made this feature even better by introducing auto-detect for scrolling. Yes, you can still manually toggle momentum scrolling on and off with the button under the scroll wheel, but now if you scroll hard enough and let go, the MX Master automatically switches to momentum scrolling mode. When the scroll wheel slows down, it’ll click back into manual scrolling mode. It’s the best of both worlds without having to change your habits at all.

All Three Mice Are Champions

This isn’t the kind of showdown where there’s really a “winner”—all three mice are great, and it’s pretty hard to go wrong with any of them. The Performance MX and Proteus Core are surprisingly similar in terms of functionality, and the biggest deciding factor between the two is the kind of look you want, whether you prefer wired or wireless, and your budget. (Though the Proteus Core’s extra buttons, more powerful software, and customizable weights do give it a small edge—with an increase in price to match.)

The MX Master, on the other hand, is a fitting upgrade to the Performance MX, but it’s a pricey one. It’s definitely more feature-packed, but whether those features are ones that matter to you is another story. When you look at the MX, consider whether you need Bluetooth or the option to use the mouse with multiple PCs. If the Performance MX was your perfect mouse, you might not feel like you need the MX Master’s new features—but they’re really nice when you have them, and once you do, you’ll definitely rely on them.

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

Once upon a time, Logitech’s MX Revolution was the most popular mouse around, and with good reason: It was comfortable, customizable, and its “momentum scrolling” is a lifesaver. Now, it has three successors, all of which are a bit different: The Performance MX, the new and powerful MX Master, and the gaming-focused G502 Proteus Core. Here’s how they compare.

http://lifehacker.com/5865351/how-to…

The Contenders

Logitech has a huge product line, but when it comes down to their best stuff, these three take the cake:

  • The Logitech Performance Mouse MX ($50 at Amazon) was the first successor the the MX Revolution, and retains most of its best features. It’s been so popular that Logitech has been producing it, unchanged, for six years.
  • The Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse ($92 at Amazon) is the latest entry in the MX line, and the successor to the Performance MX. Featuring an updated design, battery, and some new features, it’s the mouse Logitech wants you to move to when your Performance MX finally dies.
  • The Logitech G502 Proteus Core Gaming Mouse ($76 at Amazon) isn’t technically in the MX line, but it’s so similar you’d think it was. It boasts most of the same buttons and features as the Performance MX and even feels similar in your hand, albeit with a more “gamer”-focused aesthetic and software.

It’s worth noting up front that all of these mice are, sadly, for right-handers only. Logitech does have a few left-handed and ambidextrous mice, but the three kings are made for right-handed folks.

The mice have more similarities than differences, but if you’re having a hard time deciding which to buy, we’ve got you covered.

Look and Feel

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX (left) feels like it was made to fit in your hand. It’s perfect for palm grippers who like to rest their whole hand on the mouse. Even if you have smaller hands, this larger mouse will fit them well.

The MX Master (center) is a little taller than the Performance MX, and it’s also a palm gripper’s mouse, even though it feels good in the hand regardless of grip. Logitech definitely wants you to use this mouse in a specific way, and you’ll know it as soon as you put your hand on it. The MX’s smooth curves are replaced with modern angles, which take up a little less space while still comfortable to use. It’s also a little heavier than the MX, but it shares the same footprint on your desk.

The Proteus Core (right) is similar in size to the Performance MX, but with a distinct “gaming” look: hard edges, LED lights, and a blue accent along the side. It also comes with a set of weights in the bottom that you can move or reconfigure to make the mouse heavier, lighter, or move weight to different sides of the mouse. This is really nice, since it essentially lets you customize the weight and feel of the mouse to your desires.

The Buttons

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is pretty basic in terms of buttons, but has all the ones that count. It has a left and right click, a scroll wheel that moves up and down and side to side, and back and forward buttons on the side. It also has a hidden “Thumb” button that’s perfect for Task View in Windows or Mission Control/Exposé in OS X. There’s also a very tiny “Zoom” button. All of the buttons are programmable through Logitech’s software.

The MX Master has all of the same buttons the Performance MX boasts, with a few improvements. The button under the thumb-rest is gesture sensitive now, and can do things like maximize windows or snap left or right in Windows, or toggle Mission Control and Exposé in OS X. One of the best things about the MX Master is the return of the thumbwheel from the MX Revolution, the Performance MX’s older brother. It’s perfect for swiping through documents and scrolling through spreadsheets. The back and forward buttons rest directly behind it. Depending on your hand, the thumbwheel and buttons are comfortable and easy to get to, or you have to pull your hand back a bit to get your thumb on them. For me, they’re perfectly placed.

The Proteus Core adds a few buttons to the MX layout, but not too many. In fact, it only has three more than the Performance MX. It has back and forward buttons, just like the MX mice, and a thumb button meant for sniping in games (which is just a tad harder to reach than the MX’s thumb buttons). However, unlike the MX mice, it also has two DPI buttons and a “G9” button that comes unprogrammed. All of the buttons are customizable through Logitech’s software.

Wired vs. Wireless

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX is only available as a wireless mouse. You can technically plug it in with a USB cable, but you’ll still need the wireless receiver plugged in as well. If you prefer wireless mice, you’ll be happy with it, but it can also be a con—after all, you have to worry about charging it, and I’ve found that lots of wireless mice have had problems with power or connection later on in life.

The MX Master is also wireless, but it adds Bluetooth support to the mix. It can also charge and operate simultaneously while plugged in via USB, but you won’t need to keep it plugged in for long—Logitech boasts you can get a whole day’s worth of charge in four minutes of charging, and I’ve found that to be true. It’s also worth noting that the MX Master can also “connect” to up the three devices at once, via Unifying Receiver or Bluetooth. To switch active devices, just press a button on the underside of the mouse. This makes it ideal for keeping one mouse at home (or at work and at home) that you use to control multiple PCs.

The Proteus Core, on the other hand, only comes as a wired mouse. I was very happy with it though; it has a nice long braided cable that doesn’t feel like it tugs or snags the mouse in any way. After decades of hating wired mice, the Proteus Core has converted me.

Note that the Logitech G602, while not a direct alternative to the Proteus Core, is a somewhat similar mouse that comes in wireless.

Software and Customization

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Performance MX and MX Master use Logitech’s boringly-named “Logitech Options” software, which allows you to customize pointer and scrolling speed, smooth scrolling, the mode of the scroll wheel (free spinning or ratcheting), and even the default direction apps scroll when you move the thumb or scroll wheel (for those of you who for some reason want scrolling the wheel down to mean page up). You also get the usual button customization options, so you can re-map each of the Performance MX and MX Master’s buttons to virtually anything you like—even keystrokes or system features, like opening Launchpad on the Mac or the Start Menu in Windows.

Beyond button programming, scrolling options, and pointer sensitivity though, that’s about it. Logitech Options is barebones otherwise, and while you can use it to manage multiple Logitech mice, you can’t record complex macros, set different “profiles” for work and home, or work and play, and you can’t save those profiles to the mouse—they’re stored on your PC, locally.

Logitech Mouse Showdown: Performance MX vs. MX Master vs. G502 Proteus Core

The Proteus Core uses a slightly different program called “Logitech Gaming Software”, which is significantly more powerful. Logitech’s gaming software lets you program buttons to functions and keystrokes just like Logitech Options, but also lets you record complex macros with the click of a button. It can also store profiles on the mouse itself (rather than on your computer), “tune” the mouse to your mousepad or desk’s surface, analyze how often you press certain buttons, and turn on “angle snapping” for straighter lines. All of these features turn the Proteus core into a pretty killer productivity tool, even if they were meant for gaming.

http://lifehacker.com/why-i-started-…

Other Extra Features

The Performance MX and Proteus Core have my all-time favorite mouse feature: momentum scrolling. The wheel scrolls normally, like any other mouse, with a series of clicks that scrolls a certain number of lines. However, with the press of a button under the wheel, it switches to a free-spinning mode. Flick it, and it’ll continue spinning at breakneck speeds until you stop it, which is awesome for scrolling back to the top of large web pages or documents. I can’t live without this feature in a mouse. (Check out the video above at the :37 second mark to see it in action.)

The MX Master made this feature even better by introducing auto-detect for scrolling. Yes, you can still manually toggle momentum scrolling on and off with the button under the scroll wheel, but now if you scroll hard enough and let go, the MX Master automatically switches to momentum scrolling mode. When the scroll wheel slows down, it’ll click back into manual scrolling mode. It’s the best of both worlds without having to change your habits at all.

All Three Mice Are Champions

This isn’t the kind of showdown where there’s really a “winner”—all three mice are great, and it’s pretty hard to go wrong with any of them. The Performance MX and Proteus Core are surprisingly similar in terms of functionality, and the biggest deciding factor between the two is the kind of look you want, whether you prefer wired or wireless, and your budget. (Though the Proteus Core’s extra buttons, more powerful software, and customizable weights do give it a small edge—with an increase in price to match.)

The MX Master, on the other hand, is a fitting upgrade to the Performance MX, but it’s a pricey one. It’s definitely more feature-packed, but whether those features are ones that matter to you is another story. When you look at the MX, consider whether you need Bluetooth or the option to use the mouse with multiple PCs. If the Performance MX was your perfect mouse, you might not feel like you need the MX Master’s new features—but they’re really nice when you have them, and once you do, you’ll definitely rely on them.

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

http://smile.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Logitech’s MX Series of mice handily dragged the title of “Best Desktop Mouse” to its Documents folder, taking down 50% of your votes. The MX Series won the same contest in 2011 on Gizmodo, in 2012 in Lifehacker’s Hive Five, and had its latest iteration recently reviewed as the best mouse ever on Gizmodo.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-desk…

http://lifehacker.com/5931795/five-b…

http://gizmodo.com/5857215/the-be…


The Lineup:

Logitech MX Master

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

Logitech MX Anywhere 2

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Anywh…

Logitech Performance MX

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…


Alternatives

Wired

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-gami…

Trackball

Grab the Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball, which took fifth place in both the desktop and gaming mouse voting rounds.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-910-0…

Gaming

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

Vertical (ergonomic)

The Anker Vertical Mouse was the most recommended of its category in our nominations round. It’s also super cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BIFNTMC

Lefty

Snag a left-handed version of the Razer DeathAdder or Naga, which tied for first and took fourth respectively in our gaming mouse vote.


More Gear For Work:


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker.

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Logitech’s MX Series of mice handily dragged the title of “Best Desktop Mouse” to its Documents folder, taking down 50% of your votes. The MX Series won the same contest in 2011 on Gizmodo, in 2012 in Lifehacker’s Hive Five, and had its latest iteration recently reviewed as the best mouse ever on Gizmodo.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-desk…

http://lifehacker.com/5931795/five-b…

http://gizmodo.com/5857215/the-be…


The Lineup:

Logitech MX Master

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

Logitech MX Anywhere 2

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Anywh…

Logitech Performance MX

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…


Alternatives

Wired

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-gami…

Trackball

Grab the Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball, which took fifth place in both the desktop and gaming mouse voting rounds.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-910-0…

Gaming

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

Vertical (ergonomic)

The Anker Vertical Mouse was the most recommended of its category in our nominations round. It’s also super cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BIFNTMC

Lefty

Snag a left-handed version of the Razer DeathAdder or Naga, which tied for first and took fourth respectively in our gaming mouse vote.


More Gear For Work:


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker.

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Logitech’s MX Series of mice handily dragged the title of “Best Desktop Mouse” to its Documents folder, taking down 50% of your votes. The MX Series won the same contest in 2011 on Gizmodo, in 2012 in Lifehacker’s Hive Five, and had its latest iteration recently reviewed as the best mouse ever on Gizmodo.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-desk…

http://lifehacker.com/5931795/five-b…

http://gizmodo.com/5857215/the-be…


The Lineup:

Logitech MX Master

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

Logitech MX Anywhere 2

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Anywh…

Logitech Performance MX

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…


Alternatives

Wired

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-gami…

Trackball

Grab the Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball, which took fifth place in both the desktop and gaming mouse voting rounds.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-910-0…

Gaming

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

Vertical (ergonomic)

The Anker Vertical Mouse was the most recommended of its category in our nominations round. It’s also super cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BIFNTMC

Lefty

Snag a left-handed version of the Razer DeathAdder or Naga, which tied for first and took fourth respectively in our gaming mouse vote.


More Gear For Work:


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker.

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Logitech’s MX Series of mice handily dragged the title of “Best Desktop Mouse” to its Documents folder, taking down 50% of your votes. The MX Series won the same contest in 2011 on Gizmodo, in 2012 in Lifehacker’s Hive Five, and had its latest iteration recently reviewed as the best mouse ever on Gizmodo.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-desk…

http://lifehacker.com/5931795/five-b…

http://gizmodo.com/5857215/the-be…


The Lineup:

Logitech MX Master

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

Logitech MX Anywhere 2

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Anywh…

Logitech Performance MX

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…


Alternatives

Wired

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-gami…

Trackball

Grab the Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball, which took fifth place in both the desktop and gaming mouse voting rounds.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-910-0…

Gaming

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

Vertical (ergonomic)

The Anker Vertical Mouse was the most recommended of its category in our nominations round. It’s also super cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BIFNTMC

Lefty

Snag a left-handed version of the Razer DeathAdder or Naga, which tied for first and took fourth respectively in our gaming mouse vote.


More Gear For Work:


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker.

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Most Popular Desktop Mouse: Logitech MX, Plus Alternatives

Logitech’s MX Series of mice handily dragged the title of “Best Desktop Mouse” to its Documents folder, taking down 50% of your votes. The MX Series won the same contest in 2011 on Gizmodo, in 2012 in Lifehacker’s Hive Five, and had its latest iteration recently reviewed as the best mouse ever on Gizmodo.

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-desk…

http://lifehacker.com/5931795/five-b…

http://gizmodo.com/5857215/the-be…


The Lineup:

Logitech MX Master

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Maste…

Logitech MX Anywhere 2

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Anywh…

Logitech Performance MX

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wirel…


Alternatives

Wired

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Prote…

http://co-op.kinja.com/five-best-gami…

Trackball

Grab the Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball, which took fifth place in both the desktop and gaming mouse voting rounds.

http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-910-0…

Gaming

Pick up the Logitech G502 Proteus Core, which took second place in the voting round, tied for first place in the gaming mouse vote, and also happens to be my favorite.

Vertical (ergonomic)

The Anker Vertical Mouse was the most recommended of its category in our nominations round. It’s also super cheap.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BIFNTMC

Lefty

Snag a left-handed version of the Razer DeathAdder or Naga, which tied for first and took fourth respectively in our gaming mouse vote.


More Gear For Work:


Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here to learn more. We want your feedback.

Send deal submissions to Deals@Gawker and all other inquiries to Shane@Gawker.