Tag Archives: Operating Systems

Recalbox Is a Dead Simple Game Emulator Operating System for the Raspberry Pi

Recalbox Is a Dead Simple Game Emulator Operating System for the Raspberry Pi

When it comes to turning a Raspberry Pi into a retro game console, we’ve long recommended RetroPie because it’s relatively simple to set up, but still packed with a ton of features. If you’re looking for something even simpler to use, Recalbox is worth a look.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-turn-yo…

Recalbox is an open source operating system built with the same basic backbone as RetroPie, but with a simplified interface and setup process. At a glance, the general usage is a little easier than RetroPie, with four-player controller support a little more obvious, and an easier update system that keeps your emulators up to date. The media center software, Kodi is also packed in from the start with no additional set up required. We’ll have to dig in deeper to see how it compares overall to RetroPie, but it’s worth a look if you’ve been frustrated with RetroPie for whatever reason.

Recalbox

Kano’s Educational Operating System Now Works on the Raspberry Pi Zero 

Kano's Educational Operating System Now Works on the Raspberry Pi Zero 

Kano’s Raspberry Pi kit is a bit of a crowd favorite, even though it clock in a bit on the expensive side. The bright orange colors combined with the custom operating system built for learning makes it appealing for kids learning to code. Now, they’ve updated their OS to work on the much cheaper new Raspberry Pi Zero.

http://lifehacker.com/the-kano-kit-t…

The operating system works pretty the same as before, packing in tons of different education programs in so kids can learn all kinds of things about electronics and coding. But this version’s made especially for the Zero, so it’ll run well even though the Zero’s pint-sized by comparison. It’s worth checking out if you have kids you’re teaching to code, and you don’t need the full Kano kit to make use of the operating system.

Kano

Windows 10: The Gizmodo Review

Windows 10 defies review.

Read more…

Okay, So Maybe You Won’t Get Windows 10 on July 29th

Okay, So Maybe You Won't Get Windows 10 on July 29th

Are you entitled to a free copy of Windows 10? There’s a flowchart for that. However, there’s no flowchart to tell you when you might actually get Microsoft’s new operating system. Officially, Windows 10 is coming July 29th, but not everyone will get it that day—now, says Microsoft, it will roll out in waves.

The official Windows Blog explains:

Starting on July 29, we will start rolling out Windows 10 to our Windows Insiders. From there, we will start notifying reserved systems in waves, slowly scaling up after July 29th. Each day of the roll-out, we will listen, learn and update the experience for all Windows 10 users.

So if you’re part of Microsoft’s Windows Insider beta testing program, maybe you’ll get it on July 29th. Maybe. For everyone else, you’d better have clicked that “Get Windows 10” prompt that mysteriously showed up in your Windows toolbar to reserve your digital copy of the OS, because those will also be rolling out in waves. Microsoft doesn’t say if they’re first-come, first-serve, but the company doesn’t say they aren’t, either.

Honestly, this is probably a good thing. From what I’ve seen of the preview builds, Windows 10 isn’t quite ready. I’ve run into a wide variety of bugs that you don’t typically see this close to the launch of a major operating system. Tom Warren, a Windows 10 expert at The Verge, seems to agree. Launching this way lets Microsoft iron out these issues slowly, relying on its most dedicated and enthusiastic users to help spot the bugs—instead of facing a potential backlash by releasing a “finished” OS to everyone simultaneously.

And it’s hard to argue with that strategy when Microsoft is handing out Windows 10 for free!

Just don’t be surprised if—when July 29th rolls around—you can’t find your copy.


Contact the author at sean.hollister@gizmodo.com.

How to Build a Computer: The Complete Guide

How to Build a Computer: The Complete Guide

Building a computer from scratch gives you the perfect machine for your needs, but it can be daunting the first time around. Here’s our complete guide, from picking the parts, to putting it together and installing your OS.

This Night School series was originally published in 2011. We’ve gone through and given it some much-needed updates: we changed outdated references, added some new resources and tools, and expanded a few sections. Enjoy!

Lesson 1: Hardware Basics

For our first lesson in building your own PC, we start with a little computer hardware basics.

Lesson 2: Choose and Buy Your Parts

In this lesson, we’ll show you how to most effectively pick out and shop for your parts.

Lesson 3: Building the Computer

Assembling your computer can seem daunting, but it’s actually pretty easy. In lesson 3, we show you step-by-step how to put everything together.

Lesson 4: Installing Your Operating System

Once you’ve put it together, you’re past the difficult portion. Lesson 4 deals with installing your operating system and get everything up and running.

Lesson 5: Further Resources

There’s a lot more computer-building info out there than we can fit into one Night School. In our final lesson, we share some other resources that should help you in both the building and post-building steps.

If you’d like all of these lessons in a printable format, I recommend sending each article to a service like Readability or Pocket. That way, you can print out a clean, readable version that you can reference as you build. Thanks for learning with us this week!


Check out the full Lifehacker Night School series for more beginners lessons covering all sorts of topics.

Scaling Windows – The DPI Arms Race

For several years now, device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of devices – primarily mobile devices – higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display, an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960×480 3.5” display. Keen to trump the Retina moniker, makers of Android devices soon churned out devices with displays with PPIs of 440 and higher, with the current push to 2560×1440 displays in 5.5” or smaller sizes which yield an amazing 500+ PPI. We’ve seen a similar race in the tablet space, with 1280×800 soon giving way to 2560×1600 displays, but this time in a 7” to 10” form factor. Not wanting to be left out, Windows laptops and desktops are now starting to ship with high DPI displays. Unfortunately, Windows isn’t a simple matter of higher DPI being better; let’s discuss some of the history, problems, current solutions, and the future outlook for DPI scaling with Windows.

Scaling Windows – The DPI Arms Race

For several years now, device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of devices – primarily mobile devices – higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display, an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960×480 3.5” display. Keen to trump the Retina moniker, makers of Android devices soon churned out devices with displays with PPIs of 440 and higher, with the current push to 2560×1440 displays in 5.5” or smaller sizes which yield an amazing 500+ PPI. We’ve seen a similar race in the tablet space, with 1280×800 soon giving way to 2560×1600 displays, but this time in a 7” to 10” form factor. Not wanting to be left out, Windows laptops and desktops are now starting to ship with high DPI displays. Unfortunately, Windows isn’t a simple matter of higher DPI being better; let’s discuss some of the history, problems, current solutions, and the future outlook for DPI scaling with Windows.

Scaling Windows – The DPI Arms Race

For several years now, device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of devices – primarily mobile devices – higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display, an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960×480 3.5” display. Keen to trump the Retina moniker, makers of Android devices soon churned out devices with displays with PPIs of 440 and higher, with the current push to 2560×1440 displays in 5.5” or smaller sizes which yield an amazing 500+ PPI. We’ve seen a similar race in the tablet space, with 1280×800 soon giving way to 2560×1600 displays, but this time in a 7” to 10” form factor. Not wanting to be left out, Windows laptops and desktops are now starting to ship with high DPI displays. Unfortunately, Windows isn’t a simple matter of higher DPI being better; let’s discuss some of the history, problems, current solutions, and the future outlook for DPI scaling with Windows.

Scaling Windows – The DPI Arms Race

For several years now, device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of devices – primarily mobile devices – higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display, an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960×480 3.5” display. Keen to trump the Retina moniker, makers of Android devices soon churned out devices with displays with PPIs of 440 and higher, with the current push to 2560×1440 displays in 5.5” or smaller sizes which yield an amazing 500+ PPI. We’ve seen a similar race in the tablet space, with 1280×800 soon giving way to 2560×1600 displays, but this time in a 7” to 10” form factor. Not wanting to be left out, Windows laptops and desktops are now starting to ship with high DPI displays. Unfortunately, Windows isn’t a simple matter of higher DPI being better; let’s discuss some of the history, problems, current solutions, and the future outlook for DPI scaling with Windows.

Scaling Windows – The DPI Arms Race

For several years now, device manufacturers have been in a race to push the pixel density of devices – primarily mobile devices – higher and higher. The race began with the iPhone 4 “Retina” display, an at the time impressive 330 pixels per inch (PPI) 960×480 3.5” display. Keen to trump the Retina moniker, makers of Android devices soon churned out devices with displays with PPIs of 440 and higher, with the current push to 2560×1440 displays in 5.5” or smaller sizes which yield an amazing 500+ PPI. We’ve seen a similar race in the tablet space, with 1280×800 soon giving way to 2560×1600 displays, but this time in a 7” to 10” form factor. Not wanting to be left out, Windows laptops and desktops are now starting to ship with high DPI displays. Unfortunately, Windows isn’t a simple matter of higher DPI being better; let’s discuss some of the history, problems, current solutions, and the future outlook for DPI scaling with Windows.