Tag Archives: Reading

Five Brain-Boosting Books Bill Gates Suggests You Read This Summer

The summer is just getting started, which means it’s about time for a few good books—and Bill Gates himself has five great suggestions for books that’ll expand your mind on topics of science, philosophy, history, mathematics, and science fiction. He runs them down in this quick video.

Bill elaborates on some of his specific thoughts on each book in the video, so it’s well worth a watch. Here’s a quick list of the five books:

From the origins of life, the history of mitochondria, the history of consciousness and a past to present to future look at human civilization, to mathematics and the world of math, all the way to entrepreneurship and business, and finally to science fiction (respectively,) there’s a book here for everyone, although we’d honestly suggest reading all five. After all, the summer’s just now starting.

Five Books to Read This Summer | Gates Notes via BoingBoing

Tomorrow’s Free Comic Book Day, Here’s How to Find Your Local Shop

Tomorrow, Saturday, March 7th, is Free Comic Book Day, the day where you can walk into your local comic book shop, get a pile of random swag, and peruse the shop’s collection while you’re at it. Here’s how to find the shop closest to you.

If you’ve never gone out for Free Comic Book Day, everything you need to know is in the title. Participating comic shops get a pack of comics and they give those away to anyone who comes into the store. Head over to the official store locator page, type in your zip code, and you get a list of all the shops in your area participating in the event. The results have a few different badges on them to help you find a good shop for you. Most notably, some get a family friendly badge, which denotes the shop has a good selection of comics for younger kids. Some shops also do special events like artist appearances, signings, sales, or giveaways. If a shop’s doing some special, you’ll see a note below the result with a link to whatever their plans are.

Free Comic Book Day

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Amazon has somehow managed to create four different models of its Kindle ereader. Each of the four models has its own strengths and weaknesses, so if you’re in the market for one—or an upgrade—let’s take a look to make your buying decision a little easier.

The Contenders

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

It’s no secret that Amazon has the lock on ereaders. Sure, the Kobo and Nook are still around, but the Kindle dominates the ereader space. Here’s a quick overview of the four models available right now:

  • Kindle: Amazon’s basic Kindle retails for $79.99. It’s about as basic an ereader as you can get, which means it doesn’t come with a built-in light and at 167 ppi, this Kindle has the lowest resolution of all the models available.
  • Kindle Paperwhite: The Paperwhite is $119.99. It features a backlight powered by four LEDS and a 300 ppi resolution screen.
  • Kindle Voyage: The Voyage was Amazon’s first foray into luxury Kindles and comes in at $199.99. It has six LEDs and an adaptive light sensor for the backlight, as well as a touch sensor on the case to change pages.
  • Kindle Oasis: The Oasis is the newest Kindle model, and costs an absolutely insane $289.99. That $300 gets you a backlight powered by 10 LEDs, hardware buttons for turning pages, and a charging cover that keeps your Kindle alive for months between charges instead of weeks.

All four of these models have access to the Amazon Kindle book store and use Amazon’s Whispersync technology to sync up your reading with the Kindle mobile apps and with Audible. They each come with 4GB of storage, and they all have the same software. Each of them has a similar battery life that typically lasts several weeks, excluding the Oasis’ special charging cover.. All four models also require a $20 one-time payment to get rid of the “special offer” ads on the screensaver. The user-experience on all the models is the same, so it’s really just the hardware that differs.

http://lifehacker.com/a-students-gui…

The Model-Specific Features that Separate Each Kindle

Being ereaders, you wouldn’t think you’d find a ton of distinguishing features between models, especially when they’re all from the same company. However, Amazon’s found a way to make each of these models stand on their own.

The base Kindle is exactly what you think of when you think of an ereader. It’s small, has an e-ink display, and features a touch screen for turning pages, shopping in the Amazon store, and browsing your library. It is the only model that has a 167 ppi screen, which means it’s the worst looking screen of the bunch.

The Paperwhite is essentially the regular Kindle, with a better, backlit display. The Paperwhite has a 300 ppi screen, the same screen as both the Voyage and the Oasis. It also comes with a four LED backlit display. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but between the improved resolution and the backlight, it makes reading on the Paperwhite a much more enjoyable experience. The backlight means you can read in darker areas without carrying around an obnoxious reading light, and the improved resolution cleans up the text quite a bit.

The Voyage is a beefed up Paperwhite. It has the same backlit display, but packs in six LEDs to provide more even light distribution across the display. That display has an adaptive light sensor that automatically adjusts the brightness based on the light around you. The Voyage also has a feature Amazon calls “PagePress” that allows you to turn pages by touching the case as opposed to tapping the screen.

The Oasis bucks the trend here a bit. It isn’t exactly a better version of the Oasis, it’s an ereader all its own. The Oasis has the same 300 ppi screen as the Paperwhite and Voyage, but its 10 LED lights provide even lighting across the display no matter where you are. That display does not include the adaptive light sensor of the Voyage though, so you’ll have to manually change the brightness in direct or low light. The Oasis also comes with that previously mentioned charging case. Perhaps more importantly, the Oasis is the only Kindle with physical buttons for turning pages. It also has an orientation sensor so you can flip the device to comfortably read left or right-handed.

If you don’t have constant access to Wi-Fi, the Paperwhite, Voyage, and Oasis are available in 3G options. The base Kindle is only available as a Wi-Fi model. The 3G models are much pricier though, coming in at $189.99 for the Paperwhite, $289.99 for the Voyage, and $359.99 for the Oasis. Unless you don’t have access to Wi-Fi at all, the 3G models are probably unnecessary for most people.

Size and Shape Are Mostly the Same, Except for The Oasis

As far as looks go, the Kindle, Paperwhite, and Voyage are all relatively the same design, size, and weight. The Oasis is the only one that actually looks any different.

There are minor discrepancies between the models. For example, the base Kindle is only 6.7 ounces, while the Paperwhite is 7.2 ounces. The Voyage has the touch buttons on the sides of the case for flipping pages and is about .3 inches shorter than the other two, but all told it looks pretty much the same as the Paperwhite at a glance. All three are pretty light, easy to hold one-handed, and fit into small bags easily. Heck, they’re small enough that you can stuff one into the back pocket of a pair of jeans if you need to.

The Oasis is the odd duck here. First off, it comes with its own magnetic leather charging case. It’s removable, but it’s also packed in with the reader itself, so you’re getting it whether you want it or not. Without the case, it’s a bit lighter than other Kindles, at 4.6 ounces. At 5.6" tall, the Oasis is almost a full inch shorter than the others. The Oasis tapers on the side to make it easier to hold one-handed and it’s the only Kindle with physical buttons on the side for turning pages. Without the case, the Oasis is super light, which means holding it is a little easier, but none of the Kindles are heavy or large by any means.

The Verdict: The Paperwhite Is the Model for Everyone, The Oasis Is Good for Wealthy People

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

For most people, the Kindle Paperwhite is the perfect blend of a reasonable price and useful features. The backlight is a major step up from the base level Kindle and makes reading a much more pleasurable experience. The screen resolution is a big improvement that’s worth the extra cost of the Paperwhite compared to the base Kindle. The Wirecutter recommends it, as does CNET, PC Mag, and TechRadar. If the $120 price tag is a little steep, you can usually find it refurbished or used for cheaper.

We can’t say the same for the Voyage or Oasis though. These are luxury Kindles at luxury prices. Which isn’t to say they’re not great, but it’s hard to justify the price unless you have cash falling out of your pocket.

If money wasn’t an option, our friends over at Gizmodo say t the Oasis is the best ereader available right now, but they also note that it’s weird the Oasis doesn’t include the ambient light sensor of the Voyage. Conversely, the Voyage (which Gizmodo also called the best ereader at the time), doesn’t do nearly enough to justify the price compared to the Paperwhite. The ambient light sensor is a neat addition if you read in a variety of places, but it’s not worth the extra $80. Likewise, the haptic feedback on the case is handy, but it doesn’t work as well as it should, and that’s kind of besides the point considering you can also just move your finger a half an inch to tap the screen.

With all that said, both the Voyage and Oasis are luxury Kindles, but only one’s worth buying right now. The Oasis is easily the winner here, with recommendations from PC Mag, Gizmodo, Time, and Wired. So, if you’re looking to blow an absurd amount of money on an ereader, go with the Oasis over the Voyage.

For the rest of us, the Paperwhite is the clear winner.

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Amazon has somehow managed to create four different models of its Kindle ereader. Each of the four models has its own strengths and weaknesses, so if you’re in the market for one—or an upgrade—let’s take a look to make your buying decision a little easier.

The Contenders

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

It’s no secret that Amazon has the lock on ereaders. Sure, the Kobo and Nook are still around, but the Kindle dominates the ereader space. Here’s a quick overview of the four models available right now:

  • Kindle: Amazon’s basic Kindle retails for $79.99. It’s about as basic an ereader as you can get, which means it doesn’t come with a built-in light and at 167 ppi, this Kindle has the lowest resolution of all the models available.
  • Kindle Paperwhite: The Paperwhite is $119.99. It features a backlight powered by four LEDS and a 300 ppi resolution screen.
  • Kindle Voyage: The Voyage was Amazon’s first foray into luxury Kindles and comes in at $199.99. It has six LEDs and an adaptive light sensor for the backlight, as well as a touch sensor on the case to change pages.
  • Kindle Oasis: The Oasis is the newest Kindle model, and costs an absolutely insane $289.99. That $300 gets you a backlight powered by 10 LEDs, hardware buttons for turning pages, and a charging cover that keeps your Kindle alive for months between charges instead of weeks.

All four of these models have access to the Amazon Kindle book store and use Amazon’s Whispersync technology to sync up your reading with the Kindle mobile apps and with Audible. They each come with 4GB of storage, and they all have the same software. Each of them has a similar battery life that typically lasts several weeks, excluding the Oasis’ special charging cover.. All four models also require a $20 one-time payment to get rid of the “special offer” ads on the screensaver. The user-experience on all the models is the same, so it’s really just the hardware that differs.

http://lifehacker.com/a-students-gui…

The Model-Specific Features that Separate Each Kindle

Being ereaders, you wouldn’t think you’d find a ton of distinguishing features between models, especially when they’re all from the same company. However, Amazon’s found a way to make each of these models stand on their own.

The base Kindle is exactly what you think of when you think of an ereader. It’s small, has an e-ink display, and features a touch screen for turning pages, shopping in the Amazon store, and browsing your library. It is the only model that has a 167 ppi screen, which means it’s the worst looking screen of the bunch.

The Paperwhite is essentially the regular Kindle, with a better, backlit display. The Paperwhite has a 300 ppi screen, the same screen as both the Voyage and the Oasis. It also comes with a four LED backlit display. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but between the improved resolution and the backlight, it makes reading on the Paperwhite a much more enjoyable experience. The backlight means you can read in darker areas without carrying around an obnoxious reading light, and the improved resolution cleans up the text quite a bit.

The Voyage is a beefed up Paperwhite. It has the same backlit display, but packs in six LEDs to provide more even light distribution across the display. That display has an adaptive light sensor that automatically adjusts the brightness based on the light around you. The Voyage also has a feature Amazon calls “PagePress” that allows you to turn pages by touching the case as opposed to tapping the screen.

The Oasis bucks the trend here a bit. It isn’t exactly a better version of the Oasis, it’s an ereader all its own. The Oasis has the same 300 ppi screen as the Paperwhite and Voyage, but its 10 LED lights provide even lighting across the display no matter where you are. That display does not include the adaptive light sensor of the Voyage though, so you’ll have to manually change the brightness in direct or low light. The Oasis also comes with that previously mentioned charging case. Perhaps more importantly, the Oasis is the only Kindle with physical buttons for turning pages. It also has an orientation sensor so you can flip the device to comfortably read left or right-handed.

If you don’t have constant access to Wi-Fi, the Paperwhite, Voyage, and Oasis are available in 3G options. The base Kindle is only available as a Wi-Fi model. The 3G models are much pricier though, coming in at $189.99 for the Paperwhite, $289.99 for the Voyage, and $359.99 for the Oasis. Unless you don’t have access to Wi-Fi at all, the 3G models are probably unnecessary for most people.

Size and Shape Are Mostly the Same, Except for The Oasis

As far as looks go, the Kindle, Paperwhite, and Voyage are all relatively the same design, size, and weight. The Oasis is the only one that actually looks any different.

There are minor discrepancies between the models. For example, the base Kindle is only 6.7 ounces, while the Paperwhite is 7.2 ounces. The Voyage has the touch buttons on the sides of the case for flipping pages and is about .3 inches shorter than the other two, but all told it looks pretty much the same as the Paperwhite at a glance. All three are pretty light, easy to hold one-handed, and fit into small bags easily. Heck, they’re small enough that you can stuff one into the back pocket of a pair of jeans if you need to.

The Oasis is the odd duck here. First off, it comes with its own magnetic leather charging case. It’s removable, but it’s also packed in with the reader itself, so you’re getting it whether you want it or not. Without the case, it’s a bit lighter than other Kindles, at 4.6 ounces. At 5.6" tall, the Oasis is almost a full inch shorter than the others. The Oasis tapers on the side to make it easier to hold one-handed and it’s the only Kindle with physical buttons on the side for turning pages. Without the case, the Oasis is super light, which means holding it is a little easier, but none of the Kindles are heavy or large by any means.

The Verdict: The Paperwhite Is the Model for Everyone, The Oasis Is Good for Wealthy People

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

For most people, the Kindle Paperwhite is the perfect blend of a reasonable price and useful features. The backlight is a major step up from the base level Kindle and makes reading a much more pleasurable experience. The screen resolution is a big improvement that’s worth the extra cost of the Paperwhite compared to the base Kindle. The Wirecutter recommends it, as does CNET, PC Mag, and TechRadar. If the $120 price tag is a little steep, you can usually find it refurbished or used for cheaper.

We can’t say the same for the Voyage or Oasis though. These are luxury Kindles at luxury prices. Which isn’t to say they’re not great, but it’s hard to justify the price unless you have cash falling out of your pocket.

If money wasn’t an option, our friends over at Gizmodo say t the Oasis is the best ereader available right now, but they also note that it’s weird the Oasis doesn’t include the ambient light sensor of the Voyage. Conversely, the Voyage (which Gizmodo also called the best ereader at the time), doesn’t do nearly enough to justify the price compared to the Paperwhite. The ambient light sensor is a neat addition if you read in a variety of places, but it’s not worth the extra $80. Likewise, the haptic feedback on the case is handy, but it doesn’t work as well as it should, and that’s kind of besides the point considering you can also just move your finger a half an inch to tap the screen.

With all that said, both the Voyage and Oasis are luxury Kindles, but only one’s worth buying right now. The Oasis is easily the winner here, with recommendations from PC Mag, Gizmodo, Time, and Wired. So, if you’re looking to blow an absurd amount of money on an ereader, go with the Oasis over the Voyage.

For the rest of us, the Paperwhite is the clear winner.

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

Amazon has somehow managed to create four different models of its Kindle ereader. Each of the four models has its own strengths and weaknesses, so if you’re in the market for one—or an upgrade—let’s take a look to make your buying decision a little easier.

The Contenders

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

It’s no secret that Amazon has the lock on ereaders. Sure, the Kobo and Nook are still around, but the Kindle dominates the ereader space. Here’s a quick overview of the four models available right now:

  • Kindle: Amazon’s basic Kindle retails for $79.99. It’s about as basic an ereader as you can get, which means it doesn’t come with a built-in light and at 167 ppi, this Kindle has the lowest resolution of all the models available.
  • Kindle Paperwhite: The Paperwhite is $119.99. It features a backlight powered by four LEDS and a 300 ppi resolution screen.
  • Kindle Voyage: The Voyage was Amazon’s first foray into luxury Kindles and comes in at $199.99. It has six LEDs and an adaptive light sensor for the backlight, as well as a touch sensor on the case to change pages.
  • Kindle Oasis: The Oasis is the newest Kindle model, and costs an absolutely insane $289.99. That $300 gets you a backlight powered by 10 LEDs, hardware buttons for turning pages, and a charging cover that keeps your Kindle alive for months between charges instead of weeks.

All four of these models have access to the Amazon Kindle book store and use Amazon’s Whispersync technology to sync up your reading with the Kindle mobile apps and with Audible. They each come with 4GB of storage, and they all have the same software. Each of them has a similar battery life that typically lasts several weeks, excluding the Oasis’ special charging cover.. All four models also require a $20 one-time payment to get rid of the “special offer” ads on the screensaver. The user-experience on all the models is the same, so it’s really just the hardware that differs.

http://lifehacker.com/a-students-gui…

The Model-Specific Features that Separate Each Kindle

Being ereaders, you wouldn’t think you’d find a ton of distinguishing features between models, especially when they’re all from the same company. However, Amazon’s found a way to make each of these models stand on their own.

The base Kindle is exactly what you think of when you think of an ereader. It’s small, has an e-ink display, and features a touch screen for turning pages, shopping in the Amazon store, and browsing your library. It is the only model that has a 167 ppi screen, which means it’s the worst looking screen of the bunch.

The Paperwhite is essentially the regular Kindle, with a better, backlit display. The Paperwhite has a 300 ppi screen, the same screen as both the Voyage and the Oasis. It also comes with a four LED backlit display. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but between the improved resolution and the backlight, it makes reading on the Paperwhite a much more enjoyable experience. The backlight means you can read in darker areas without carrying around an obnoxious reading light, and the improved resolution cleans up the text quite a bit.

The Voyage is a beefed up Paperwhite. It has the same backlit display, but packs in six LEDs to provide more even light distribution across the display. That display has an adaptive light sensor that automatically adjusts the brightness based on the light around you. The Voyage also has a feature Amazon calls “PagePress” that allows you to turn pages by touching the case as opposed to tapping the screen.

The Oasis bucks the trend here a bit. It isn’t exactly a better version of the Oasis, it’s an ereader all its own. The Oasis has the same 300 ppi screen as the Paperwhite and Voyage, but its 10 LED lights provide even lighting across the display no matter where you are. That display does not include the adaptive light sensor of the Voyage though, so you’ll have to manually change the brightness in direct or low light. The Oasis also comes with that previously mentioned charging case. Perhaps more importantly, the Oasis is the only Kindle with physical buttons for turning pages. It also has an orientation sensor so you can flip the device to comfortably read left or right-handed.

If you don’t have constant access to Wi-Fi, the Paperwhite, Voyage, and Oasis are available in 3G options. The base Kindle is only available as a Wi-Fi model. The 3G models are much pricier though, coming in at $189.99 for the Paperwhite, $289.99 for the Voyage, and $359.99 for the Oasis. Unless you don’t have access to Wi-Fi at all, the 3G models are probably unnecessary for most people.

Size and Shape Are Mostly the Same, Except for The Oasis

As far as looks go, the Kindle, Paperwhite, and Voyage are all relatively the same design, size, and weight. The Oasis is the only one that actually looks any different.

There are minor discrepancies between the models. For example, the base Kindle is only 6.7 ounces, while the Paperwhite is 7.2 ounces. The Voyage has the touch buttons on the sides of the case for flipping pages and is about .3 inches shorter than the other two, but all told it looks pretty much the same as the Paperwhite at a glance. All three are pretty light, easy to hold one-handed, and fit into small bags easily. Heck, they’re small enough that you can stuff one into the back pocket of a pair of jeans if you need to.

The Oasis is the odd duck here. First off, it comes with its own magnetic leather charging case. It’s removable, but it’s also packed in with the reader itself, so you’re getting it whether you want it or not. Without the case, it’s a bit lighter than other Kindles, at 4.6 ounces. At 5.6" tall, the Oasis is almost a full inch shorter than the others. The Oasis tapers on the side to make it easier to hold one-handed and it’s the only Kindle with physical buttons on the side for turning pages. Without the case, the Oasis is super light, which means holding it is a little easier, but none of the Kindles are heavy or large by any means.

The Verdict: The Paperwhite Is the Model for Everyone, The Oasis Is Good for Wealthy People

Ereader Showdown: Amazon Kindles, Compared

For most people, the Kindle Paperwhite is the perfect blend of a reasonable price and useful features. The backlight is a major step up from the base level Kindle and makes reading a much more pleasurable experience. The screen resolution is a big improvement that’s worth the extra cost of the Paperwhite compared to the base Kindle. The Wirecutter recommends it, as does CNET, PC Mag, and TechRadar. If the $120 price tag is a little steep, you can usually find it refurbished or used for cheaper.

We can’t say the same for the Voyage or Oasis though. These are luxury Kindles at luxury prices. Which isn’t to say they’re not great, but it’s hard to justify the price unless you have cash falling out of your pocket.

If money wasn’t an option, our friends over at Gizmodo say t the Oasis is the best ereader available right now, but they also note that it’s weird the Oasis doesn’t include the ambient light sensor of the Voyage. Conversely, the Voyage (which Gizmodo also called the best ereader at the time), doesn’t do nearly enough to justify the price compared to the Paperwhite. The ambient light sensor is a neat addition if you read in a variety of places, but it’s not worth the extra $80. Likewise, the haptic feedback on the case is handy, but it doesn’t work as well as it should, and that’s kind of besides the point considering you can also just move your finger a half an inch to tap the screen.

With all that said, both the Voyage and Oasis are luxury Kindles, but only one’s worth buying right now. The Oasis is easily the winner here, with recommendations from PC Mag, Gizmodo, Time, and Wired. So, if you’re looking to blow an absurd amount of money on an ereader, go with the Oasis over the Voyage.

For the rest of us, the Paperwhite is the clear winner.

Readism Adds Reading Time Estimates to Every Web Article

Readism Adds Reading Time Estimates to Every Web Article

Chrome: Sometimes, gauging whether or not you want to read an article is just about how much time you have at a given moment. Readism is a simple little extension that adds average read times to articles so you can make that choice quickly.

At the bottom of every article you open up, Readism adds a small reading time indicator. You can adjust how big this box is and how long it stays on the screen on Readism’s settings page. The reading time’s based on an average, so while it’s not exactly a perfect indicator of the time it’ll take to read an article, it’s better than nothing. That said, personalized reading times are supposedly on the way, so that might be worth keeping an eye on in the future.

Readism | Chrome Web Store via The Next Web

Amazon’s New Kindle Oasis Is $289 Worth Of Luxury Ereader

Amazon's New Kindle Oasis Is $289 Worth Of Luxury Ereader

Today, Amazon announced a brand new addition to the Kindle lineup. The Oasis is by far the most expensive Kindle around, but it also aims to be the nicest.

The Oasis has a curved edge, designed to fit neatly into one hand while you’re reading. It shares the same 300ppi screen as the Kindle Voyage, but it contains more LEDs so you can adjust the brightness to more varying degrees.

The Oasis also comes with a leather case, which includes a built-in battery. Slimming down the Oasis itself removed some space for the battery, but the case helps boost it back up. Amazon says that the combined dual-battery strategy makes the device last months.

Whether or not it’s worth the $289 is up to you. For avid readers who never put their Kindle down, the Oasis is probably the nicest one you can get right now. For casual readers, though, it could be a bit of sticker shock. Fortunately, you have a lot of cheaper Kindles to choose from if that’s the case.

Kindle Oasis | Amazon

Serial Reader for iOS Dishes Out Short Snippets of Classic Fiction Daily

Serial Reader for iOS Dishes Out Short Snippets of Classic Fiction Daily

iOS: Finding time to read is hard, but if you fancy yourself a fan of classic literature, from the likes of Jane Austen, Jules Verne, or Charles Dickens, then Serial Reader’s a clever app that allows you to essentially subscribe to classic books in a serial format that’s sent to you daily.

Once you pick a book, you get a new installment of that book every day. Each installment can be read in around 20 minutes, which means it’s a good format for people who don’t have a ton of time read. Of course, you could always just read these books in a linear fashion on your own time, but Serial Reader’s subscription format makes it a little bit more fun to crank through the classics.

Serial Reader (Free) | iTunes App Store


You Don’t Always Have to Be Up to Date On Everything

You Don't Always Have to Be Up to Date On Everything

According to local news reports, an area man stopped checking Twitter for a few minutes yesterday and promptly died because he wasn’t up to date on the haps. Except that didn’t happen. It never happens. So don’t worry like it does.

Personal finance site The Escape Artist raises the cogent point that sometimes it’s better not to be up to date. Not just in a “you darn kids and your cell phones” kind of way. Rather, staying up to date on everything means that you become exposed to new problems. The more TV shows you feel pressured to keep up on, the more they take up your free time. The more you obsessively stay up to date on the latest smartphone, the more you’ll feel the need to replace your current one. For your own well being, it might be better sometimes to simply ignore the fact that there’s new information out there:

If you want to get rich whilst improving your mental health, I suggest you stop watching TV news, adverts and infomercials. How will you cope if you don’t know what some politician said? Or what is fashionable in Milan this spring? Or who won X Factor? Or what the latest igadget is. Hint: Probably pretty well. If something genuinely interesting happens, someone will bring it to your attention via good old fashioned word of mouth. And, unless you are a diplomat, general or world leader you probably don’t need to watch distressing footage of natural disasters, terrorism or foreign wars.

The problem with staying up to date on everything is that it will never end. You’re a mortal person with a finite number of hours in the day and the world is doing more than you can keep up with. Every time you decide to read up on some story, or spend your time catching up on some major event, that’s time taken away from other tasks. That’s great if you’re paying attention to something that interests you, but if you’re only doing it because you feel left behind otherwise, maybe you’re better off missing that train.

You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned | The Escape Artist via Rockstar Finance

Photo by BuzzFarmers.

Create a Reading Challenge for Your Kids to Get Them Reading Throughout the Year

Create a Reading Challenge for Your Kids to Get Them Reading Throughout the Year

Weekly or monthly challenges are motivating and fun for adults, so why not use this strategy to encourage our kids to read more? You could set a challenge for a number of books in a specific timeframe or use this themed template to broaden your kids’ reading material.

http://lifehacker.com/seven-52-week-…

The template comes from the Clare’s Contemplations blog and includes 20 challenges (a little less than one book every two weeks), such as:

  • A book written over 100 years ago
  • A book you think looks boring
  • A book your mom or dad read when they were your age
  • A book that is set in the future

A love of reading is one of the best gifts we can give our kids. This is just another way to work that into your family’s life. Check out the link below for the full challenge checklist (printable).

2016 Reading Challenge (For Kids!) | Clare’s Contemplations

Photo by craigemorsels.