Tag Archives: Rice

Make Thai Sticky Rice Using a Colander and a Pot

Make Thai Sticky Rice Using a Colander and a Pot

Thai sticky rice (also known as sweet rice or glutinous rice) is a delightfully interactive grain that can be shaped into little balls and scoops that are perfect for dipping. The sticky stuff is usually made with a fancy basket, but you can make it with your colander.

We’ve previously discussed making Thai sticky rice using a spatter guard, but Food 52 argues that a colander is even better. Not only does it hold more rice than a spatter guard, but it’s a much more common kitchen item. (I don’t know about you, but I don’t have a spatter guard.)

Cooking the rice is pretty simple, but the most important part is buying the correct rice. Don’t overthink it, just know that Jasmine rice is not what you’re looking for; look for a rice (preferably a Thai brand like Three Horses) with words like “Thai,” “sweet rice,” and “glutinous rice,” on the packaging.

Once you have purchased the correct rice, grab a pot (with a lid or some foil to cover) and a colander. Any colander will do, just make sure the holes aren’t bigger than the grains, for obvious reasons. Food 52 can walk you through the process in a more detailed manner, but it’s as simple as steaming. Simply fill the pot with water (you want it to be a few inches below the bottom of the colander), set the colander on top of the pot, cover, bring to a boil, lower the heat, and them steam for about fifteen minutes. You now have delicious sticky rice, ready to be dipped in as many delicious sauces as you can make.

The Best Way to Make Thai Sticky Rice (No Fancy Basket Required)|Food 52

Photo by Seba Della y Sole Bossio.

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube

The Most Likely Reason Your Rice Turned Out Mushy (And How to Avoid It)

Rice is notoriously difficult to cook perfectly, even for those with some cooking experience. When it comes to cooking rice on the stove-top, this video reveals that the secret to avoiding mushy rice might be in the way you figure out the water to rice ratios.

If a type of rice calls for a 1:1 ratio of water to rice—one cup to one cup—you’d think that doubling the recipe would just mean you use two cups of each. This video, from the America’s Test Kitchen YouTube channel, suggests that rice-to-water ratios can’t be scaled up proportionally, however, and that it may be why you’re getting mushy rice every time you cook a big batch. What they found with their testing was that evaporation doesn’t double when you double the quantity of rice you’re cooking—it stays the same. So when you double a recipe, you have to account for that evaporation when cook it. Of course, you could always just spring for a nice rice cooker too.

Science: The Secrets of Cooking Rice – The Cause of Recipe Failure is Not What You Might Think | YouTube