Tag Archives: Upgrade

Okay, So Maybe You Won’t Get Windows 10 on July 29th

Okay, So Maybe You Won't Get Windows 10 on July 29th

Are you entitled to a free copy of Windows 10? There’s a flowchart for that. However, there’s no flowchart to tell you when you might actually get Microsoft’s new operating system. Officially, Windows 10 is coming July 29th, but not everyone will get it that day—now, says Microsoft, it will roll out in waves.

The official Windows Blog explains:

Starting on July 29, we will start rolling out Windows 10 to our Windows Insiders. From there, we will start notifying reserved systems in waves, slowly scaling up after July 29th. Each day of the roll-out, we will listen, learn and update the experience for all Windows 10 users.

So if you’re part of Microsoft’s Windows Insider beta testing program, maybe you’ll get it on July 29th. Maybe. For everyone else, you’d better have clicked that “Get Windows 10” prompt that mysteriously showed up in your Windows toolbar to reserve your digital copy of the OS, because those will also be rolling out in waves. Microsoft doesn’t say if they’re first-come, first-serve, but the company doesn’t say they aren’t, either.

Honestly, this is probably a good thing. From what I’ve seen of the preview builds, Windows 10 isn’t quite ready. I’ve run into a wide variety of bugs that you don’t typically see this close to the launch of a major operating system. Tom Warren, a Windows 10 expert at The Verge, seems to agree. Launching this way lets Microsoft iron out these issues slowly, relying on its most dedicated and enthusiastic users to help spot the bugs—instead of facing a potential backlash by releasing a “finished” OS to everyone simultaneously.

And it’s hard to argue with that strategy when Microsoft is handing out Windows 10 for free!

Just don’t be surprised if—when July 29th rolls around—you can’t find your copy.


Contact the author at sean.hollister@gizmodo.com.

Consider Upgrading to a Hotel’s Club Floor to Save on Perks

Consider Upgrading to a Hotel’s Club Floor to Save on Perks

Hotel upgrades can be difficult to justify, especially if you spend most of your time out and about during trips. But if you can make the most of the perks that come with upgrading to a hotel’s club floor, then the cost can be worth it.

Travel+Leisure explains:

Don’t be fooled: club-level rates at brands such as Sheraton, Ritz-Carlton, Fairmont, and Marriott may be higher, but they can offer real value. Here’s what you get when you pay $100 to upgrade to a Gold-floor room at Boston’s Fairmont Copley Plaza: Breakfast for Two: $52; Evening Appetizers: $20; Evening Dessert: $20; In-Person Wake-Up Call with Juice, Coffee, or Tea: $30; Large Bottled Water: $7; Soft Drinks and Snacks from the Lounge: $10; Welcome Drink: $10; Wi-Fi: $15. The total amounts to $164, which means those who pay to upgrade will save $64.

A club floor typically includes perks, like in the above example, as well as higher rooms and a club lounge. If you already plan to spend money at the hotel on these items, consider upgrading to a hotel’s club floor to save. If you expect to eat and drink elsewhere and not spend much time relaxing at your hotel, then this deal probably isn’t for you. For more details, see the full post linked below.

Best Money-Saving Hotel Tips | Travel+Leisure

Image from elsiehui.


Wayfarer is a new blog from Lifehacker all about better travel. Follow us on Twitter here.

Has Windows 8 Improved?

Has Windows 8 Improved?

Dear Lifehacker,
I’m not a fan of what Microsoft did with Windows 8, so I didn’t upgrade when it came out. I’ve stuck with Windows 7 for the past two years, but I need a new laptop (not tablet) and they all come with Windows 8. Has it gotten any better? Can I avoid using the stupid Metro interface?

Sincerely,
Windows H8er

Dear H8er,
Windows 8 has been out for almost two years now, and its gotten two sizeable updates. Microsoft hasn’t fixed everything, but they have added a few things that should make you happier—and more cool stuff is on the way. Here’s what has (and hasn’t) changed.

The Current State of Windows 8

Let’s start with the obvious: "Metro" (now called the Modern UI) is still around, and it doesn’t seem to be going away. It’s gotten some new customizability, and is a bit easier to use with a keyboard and mouse, but if you—like most people—aren’t interested in using it, you’ll find that it’s still just as dumb as ever, and you probably won’t use it at all.

But that’s the nice thing: you don’t have to use it, and honestly, you never did. Windows 8.1 introduced Boot to Dekstop, a handy checkbox that lets you skip the Start screen entirely—something you could do since day one with one of many third-party utilities. As of the last Windows 8 update, it’s even turned on by default. And, while Microsoft hasn’t brought back the traditional Start menu yet, they’re going to—but again, you can get it back now with a tool like Start8 or Classic Shell.

In short: yes, Microsoft has fixed some of Windows 8′s most complained-about problems, but they’ve been fixable with third-party tools since the beginning. And Windows 8 still comes with some worthwhile new desktop features, which is nice.

Lastly, Windows 8 will soon allow you to run its tiled "Modern" apps in their own Windows on the desktop, which is pretty cool—though once again, you can already do this with a third-party tool called ModernMix. It’s actually a nice feature, since the Modern UI does have some good apps.

The Biggest Problem: It’s Still $80

Windows 8 doesn’t deserve the hate it gets. Sure, Microsoft made some mistakes—at least in my opinion—but if you have even the most basic computer skills, you can get around them easily.

Windows 8′s biggest downfall is, and has always been, its price. Sure, it brings some handy desktop features, but are they worth $80 ($120 for a new license)? Well…probably not. It was $40 when it came out (and even that was a stretch), but unless you really want one of its new desktop features, $80 is pretty expensive for a lot of stuff you won’t use.

That said, if you’re getting a new computer that comes bundled with Windows 8, don’t fret. You probably won’t notice that much of a difference, especially after you make a few minor tweaks. But if you’re deciding whether to upgrade your current computer, it all comes down to how much you’re willing to pay. If you can get a student discount (or get a very cheap copy through your school), it might be more worth it.

And, if you decide you really hate it that much, just make sure you get a laptop that can be downgraded to Windows 7.

Sincerely,
Lifehacker

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

  • iPhone 4 (GSM)
  • iPhone 4 (GSM Rev. A)
  • iPhone 4 (CDMA)
  • iPhone 4S
  • iPhone 5 (GSM)
  • iPhone 5 (Rev. A)
  • iPad 3 (Wi-Fi)
  • iPad 4 (Wi-Fi)
  • iPad mini (Wi-Fi)

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version or you install the beta).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version or you install the beta).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version or you install the beta).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version or you install the beta).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

How to Upgrade to iOS 7 Right Now

Although iOS 7 won’t see an official release until September 18th, you can install the final version right now even if you’re not a developer thanks to some anonymous public postings of the software update files.

Note: We updated a few iDevices using these files and encountered no issues, but because we’re unable to verify every single one we can’t say for certain that problems won’t arise. This is the GM release—the same one that will get released to the world next week—so it should work just the same, but there’s always a chance you could run into an issue. Please be aware that there’s some risk involved before you upgrade.

Back Up First!

Before you do anything, back up your iDevice with iTunes. In the past, we’ve rarely seen an issue with early upgrades but that doesn’t mean issues don’t happen. You may need to restore your device, so back it up first!

Download iOS 7

Thanks to a public (and probably temporary) posting on Mega, a number of iOS 7 updates are available for download. Not all devices were posted, but if more show up we’ll add them. Here’s what’s available so far:

Note: iOS 7 requires a later version of iTunes so you may not be able to use your iDevice with iTunes post-update (at least, not until Apple releases the new version or you install the beta).

Install the Update

To install iOS 7 on your device, follow these instructions:

  1. Open up the disk image (.dmg) and find the iPhone Software Update file (.ipsw) for your device. Drag it to the desktop, or a folder of your choosing. (Windows users will need a tool like 7-Zip to do this, and will need to open the .hfs inside the .dmg as well.)
  2. Open iTunes and connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, to your computer.
  3. If your device isn’t automatically selected in iTunes, select it and go to the "Summary" tab.
  4. Hold down the option key (OS X) or the shift key (Windows) and click the Restore button. Browse to the .ipsw file you downloaded, select it, and wait for the update to finish.
  5. If necessary, restore your device from backup and sync with iTunes.

That’s it. If you follow those steps, you’ll be up and running iOS 7 in no time.