Tag Archives: Vegetables

Why You Should Plant Flowers With Your Vegetables

If you’re trying to grow a vegetable garden you might not think beyond planting the specific variety of desired vegetable, but it can be very beneficial to give your plant a friend. Flowers and other types of plants will attract helpful insects, suppress weeds, and more.

This video from GrowVeg explains why. Attracting more bugs sounds unappealing, but these bugs will be your gardening allies. Plants like lavender and oregano attract ladybugs, for example, and ladybug larvae will eat the annoying aphids that may be hurting your other plants. That means flowers that are rich in pollen will be best (something like daises or single dahlias with a single ring of petals). Moreover, some plants like nasturtium will attract aphids away from your more precious varieties. Not a great deal for the nasturtium, but good for your vegetables.

And the visual and olfactory appeal is more than superficial; a dense varietal garden will make it more difficult for pests to find their favorite plant to eat. Watch the full video to learn more about why you should put some friendly plants in your garden.

Companion Planting: Why Vegetables Need Friends | GrowVeg

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube

Four Tips for Building Better Salads at the Salad Bar

With the potential combinations a salad bar provides, you can get carried away and end up with a soggy, mish-mash of ingredients. These tips will help you build a more balanced salad, both in flavor and in texture.

In this video from the “Stop Doing It Wrong” series on the ZAGAT YouTube channel, you’ll learn some simple rules of thumb for making better salads from Tony Shure and Colin McCabe, the co-founders of Chopt in New York City. Here’s what they suggest:

  1. Don’t use wet lettuce: Salad dressing doesn’t stick to it very well. Dry those wet leafy greens off with a paper towel first if possible.
  2. Pick a theme and stick to it: Don’t fall prey to “salad bar syndrome” and add every single thing you like to your salad just because it’s good on its own. Find a focus.
  3. Don’t overload on soft ingredients: Make sure your salad has equal parts soft and crunchy ingredients.
  4. Underdress your salad: It’s always better to underdress your salad and have some extra dressing on the side than to overdress your salad and ruin it.

Beyond that, Shure and McCabe recommend you give your salads great texture, color, bold flavors, a little acid, cold dressing, some crunch, and to always use the best ingredients possible.

How to Make the Best Salad | YouTube