Tag Archives: Webapps

Every Diet and Exercise Calendar You Could Need to Plan Your Routine

Every Diet and Exercise Calendar You Could Need to Plan Your Routine

It’s not hard to develop a basic diet and exercise plan the you can stick to over the years, but fine-tuning your progress offers a different set of challenges—often in the form of math. BodyBuilding.com put together a series of calculators to do the hard work for you so you can figure out exactly what you need to do to meet your health and fitness goals.

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-create-…

Let’s get one thing out of the way—you don’t have to be a bodybuilder to use this stuff. I’m not a big guy, nor do I want to be. I don’t want big muscles. I just want my diet and exercise routine to keep my body healthy and strong. When you hit an annoying plateau, or you just want some numerical guidance so you don’t feel like you’re guessing, fitness calculators can help fill in some important blanks.

http://lifehacker.com/5982028/fitnes…

With nutrition, for example, you might wonder how many carbohydrates you should eat or how much water you should drink based on your work life and exercise regimen. When it comes to fat loss goals, counting calories (or protein, if you prefer) can help you track progress your eyes can’t see (if you don’t use it as an excuse to eat more)—but not if you don’t know how much you’re burning during a workout. These calculators figure out those sorts of things for you, in addition to other helpful information like your maximum heart rate and body type.

In most cases, you enter a few statistics like age, height, and weight, and answer a couple of questions about your food intake or activity level. Click “Calculate” and you’ll get the information you’re after. While all results are going to be approximate, as they would be with any comparable tool, you can quickly figure out what you need to do to drop a little fat or even get a six pack.

Check out the full listing on BodyBuilder.com to get started. They’re all free to use.

A Large Selection of Easy to Use Fitness Calculators! | BodyBuilder.com

Title image remixed from originals by Axsimen (Shutterstock) and grmarc (Shutterstock).

Roomblocker Compares the Best Hotel Rates for Groups

Roomblocker Compares the Best Hotel Rates for Groups

Whether you’re planning a family reunion, a destination wedding, or your company’s next retreat, Roomblocker will help relieve the stress of finding the right hotel.

Enter your location and select up to 10 hotels you’d like to get quotes from. Roomblocker works with over 100,000 hotels around the world, including the major hotel chains. Then, when asking for a quote, answer a few more questions, such as your dates (flexible or not) and your budget. Roomblocker then does the hard work for you, contacting the hotels with your details and getting prices for you to compare.

Once you choose a hotel, you can finalize reservations with the hotel and invite guests to your room block.

The service is free (so it’s likely the service gets a referrer fee from the hotels). Give it a try the next time you’re charged with the headache of finding a hotel for a group.

Roomblocker via Netted

Quotationr Saves Quotes or Other Text from Around the Web With a Few Clicks

Web/Chrome: Whether you’re saving inspirational quotes for later or doing some light research, Quotationr is a fast, free, and flexible way to grab bits of text from around the web and save them to your account for future reference. Mark them public or private, tag them to keep them organized, and come back later.

Quotationr is interesting largely because it’s new, free, and superbly simple. It doesn’t do anything you can’t already accomplish with tools like Evernote or OneNote, especially if you’re already using one of those apps, but if you’re not or you’re intimidated by the sheer number of features they have, Quotationr keeps it simple and elegant.

You can copy/paste items into your account manually, but the app’s real strength comes from installing the Chrome extension. You can tell the add-on to pop up every time you select text or wait for you to click it, but in every case once you do you can tag it, set your “quote” to be public or private, and save it to your account in one or two clicks. From there, you can log in to your account to see everything you’ve saved. That’s pretty much it.

Quotationr is free—at least for starters—so you can see if you like it, and it works for you. An “unlimited” account will set you back a whopping three cents a day, or about $1/mo. If you sign up for a whole year, you’ll get a break and only pay $9. Not bad for something simple, useful, and independent, but give it a shot before you drop the cash to see if you like it.

Quotationr

Comparably Compares Your Salary with Other People In Your Field, Anonymously

Comparably Compares Your Salary with Other People In Your Field, Anonymously

The first step to making sure you’re being paid fairly is knowing how much your peers make, and while many sites provide some information on the topic, Comparably does so anonymously and privately. You have to hand over some general data about your job to get started, but once you’re in, all is revealed.

The service operates like this: you’re not asked for identifying information about your company or your name or position or anything, but you are asked about your job and for some details about your company (like how much money they’ve raised, whether they’re public, what your title and salary are, how long you’ve been at the job, and so on). Once you provide that information—and trust me, I was skeptical to hand over so much all prior to signing up and seeing anything—you do actually get a treasure trove of information about what other people in the same field with the same experience are being paid.

You could sign up with LinkedIn (I wouldn’t recommend it if you want to stay anonymous), but I tried it with an email address and managed just fine. The amount of information you provide could technically identify you or your company, but the founders assured me that the information they use is to build a profile of the industry as a whole, not to pinpoint specific companies. Once you do have your numbers though, you can check out various cities around the country to see how well you’d fare in a specific market, or just look through stats collected from the site’s users across the country.

Most of the positions are in technical fields, but there’s data for marketing positions, executive jobs, operations positions, engineering, sales, finance, and others. Hit the link below to try it out.

Comparably

Fōkasu Is a Simple Timer Based on the Ideal 52/17 Productivity Schedule 

Fōkasu Is a Simple Timer Based on the Ideal 52/17 Productivity Schedule 

Time-tracking app company DeskTime found that the most productive people worked for 52 minutes straight followed by a 17 minute break. If you’d like to try this routine yourself, Fōkasu is the easiest way to time yourself.

Just head to the site, and click the Start button. The timer will count down the 52 minutes, give you an upbeat music alert, and then count down the 17 minutes.

You could also use other timers for this, such as flexible Pomodoro timer Marina Timer, but Fōkasu already has the 52/17 ratio built in.

Fokasu

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

Microsoft’s Build conference is always full of news about Windows, Office, Xbox, and other Microsoft products, and Build 2016 was no exception. We got a look at the newest Windows 10 update coming this summer, new features for the Xbox One, and updates the Windows Store. Here’s the best new stuff we saw.

Windows 10′s Anniversary Update Is Coming This Summer

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

This summer, Microsoft will release a major update to Windows 10 that’s being affectionately called the Anniversary Update. It’ll be free for anyone currently Windows 10, and users in the Windows Insider program can download the new builds and try them out today. The Anniversary update includes a ton of improvements and new features, which we’ll go through one by one.

Windows 10 Apps, Including Microsoft Edge, Can Support Biometric Authentication

Fingerprint support is all the rage these days, but mostly on mobile devices. Microsoft got into the game in Windows 10 with Windows Hello, which allows you to use your fingerprint to log into your devices. Now, Windows 10 will allow developers to integrate that same authentication in their own apps and websites. If a developer supports Windows Hello (and if your device has a fingerprint scanner), you’ll be able to login to your email, Microsoft account, or other web service without entering a password and just by using a supported fingerprint reader.

Windows Ink Makes the Pen a Much More Powerful Tool

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

Half the problem with styluses on computers is the lack of software that supports them. In the Anniversary Update, Windows 10 will get more support for pen tools. Microsoft’s new Ink Workspace will let you create sketches, write sticky notes, annotate screenshots, and find pen-enabled apps.

Microsoft is also offering new APIs for developers to add pen-related features to their apps. One of the most interesting is a virtual ruler that users can rotate and move around freely to make drawing on-screen easier, and some auto-alignment and adjustment tools to make everything from highlighting text fall into place to drawing charts neat and tidy. Any lines drawn along the edge of the ruler will be kept perfectly straight. Microsoft has already added support for this tool to several apps including Office, but developers can add it to their own apps with just a couple lines of code. This should make stylus-friendly apps much easier to come by.

Bash Is Coming to Windows

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

What even is life.

Users of Unix-style operating systems like Linux and OS X are probably familiar with the Bash shell—it rules your command-line life. Now, Microsoft has partnered with Canonical—the company that maintains Ubuntu—to bring the Bash shell to Windows. For developers, tweakers, and people who use multiple platforms, this is huge. Now, you can use the same commands that you’re familiar with on OS X and Linux distros inside Windows, and that includes everything from file management to app development and installation.

This also opens up fans of the command line to a whole host of new tricks that aren’t available in the DOS-style command line. Microsoft points out that this isn’t an emulator or virtualized app, but Bash is running natively directly in Windows.

The Windows Store Is Getting More Apps and Gaming Features, Will Be Unified With Xbox One

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

So far in Windows 10, the Store has been a bit of an oddball. There are some modern apps that are worth using, but most developers haven’t brought their apps to the Store yet. Now, Microsoft’s making that much easier with a simple app converter. Developers can run old win32 apps to make them compatible with the Windows Store very quickly.

To demonstrate this, Microsoft showed off Age of Empires II, a very old but classic game, running as a native Windows 10 modern app. This app was the same one that’s available on Steam, just run through the converter. That was the only step necessary to make it a modern app, compatible with the Windows Store. Microsoft demoed the same thing for The Witcher 3, live on stage, turning it into a full-screen modern experience. This is already pretty huge, and developers now have an alternative, more curated store from which to sell their games to consumers.

Additionally, Microsoft announced that it will unify the Windows Store with the app store on Xbox One, which brings desktop modern apps to the Xbox (if they’re supported.) A user can flip a simple switch to turn their Xbox One into a dev kit, and developers can use this to optimize their apps to play on Xbox One. This applies to not just games, but any universal Windows app.

Since Microsoft is unifying the Store across both platforms, that means on Windows, developers will also have support for features like bundles, pre-orders, and season passes that were previously exclusive to Xbox. The Windows Store is quickly setting itself up as a Steam competitor that’s not just for games.

Cortana Is Coming to Other Platforms, Will Learn Some New Tricks

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

In the newest Windows 10 update, you’ll be able to use Cortana right from the login screen without logging in (minus the personalization, of course).

Cortana is also getting smarter, integrating everything it knows about you across all of Microsoft’s products. For example, Microsoft demoed a user asking the question “what toy store did I visit last year at Build?” Cortana recognized that “Build” is the calendar event Build 2015, and checks the user’s location history during that time frame last year for any toy stores they were in or near.

Microsoft is also opening Cortana up to other developers, so they can add features that integrate with the assistant. For example, Microsoft demoed the Just Eat app, which can optionally offer to send meals if you have a meeting during lunch. Developers won’t receive information about you that Cortana has collected unless you allow it, of course.

Microsoft’s AI Tools Help Developers Build Powerful Chat Bots

All the Important Things Microsoft Announced Today at Build 2016

Microsoft’s artificial intelligence plans don’t end with Cortana. The company also introduced tools that let developers build powerful chat bots. For example, Domino’s was on hand to demo a bot that could take natural-language orders for pizza and pass that info along to your local store.

These chat bots can also talk with Cortana. In the Skype app, Cortana was able to open conversations with third-party bots that can ask for specific information. For example, one app called Cups and Cakes notified Cortana that it has a delivery. Cortana then asks the user if she’s okay with sharing her location. The location isn’t shared with the third-party app until the user gives Cortana permission to share it.

In the same conversation, Microsoft demoed how booking an event could work. First, they told Cortana to add an event to their calendar. Cortana then proactively suggested they may want to book a hotel room and asks if she can add a third-party bot to book the hotel room. The user can then confirm or deny this request. In this case, the Westin bot was added to the conversation and helped the user find a hotel room and book it. There may be some privacy concerns when your personal assistant starts chatting with third-party bots, but we’ll have to see how it works in practice.


There are likely more new things hiding under the surface for the new Windows 10 update. We’ll poke around in the anniversary update as soon as it rolls out to Insiders to cover all the things Microsoft didn’t get around to announcing.

MeetWays Finds Meeting Places Halfway Between Two Addresses

MeetWays Finds Meeting Places Halfway Between Two Addresses

How often have you needed to meet up with someone and wished you could find a spot halfway between the two of you? For some reason, this isn’t a standard feature of Google Maps. Instead, MeetWays picks up the slack.

The site works exactly as advertised: enter two addresses and MeetWays will search for points of interest near the middle. You can also specify a certain type of place you want to meet at like a restaurant or coffee shop.

MeetWays

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

http://lifehacker.com/5924093/five-b…

  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

http://lifehacker.com/wunderlist-for…

Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

http://lifehacker.com/any-do-adds-a-…

What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

http://lifehacker.com/should-i-use-t…

The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

http://lifehacker.com/the-coolest-ex…

However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

http://lifehacker.com/5924093/five-b…

  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

http://lifehacker.com/wunderlist-for…

Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

http://lifehacker.com/any-do-adds-a-…

What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

http://lifehacker.com/should-i-use-t…

The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

http://lifehacker.com/the-coolest-ex…

However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from some of our favorite to-do apps, Wunderlist and Any.Do, which means it’s a perfect time for a fresh look at both apps. Both are still some of the best, cross-platform, free to-do managers available, but let’s see how far they’ve come.

The Contenders

If you’ve spent any time at Lifehacker, you already know Any.do and Wunderlist. They’ve been featured in many of our roundups of great to-do list managers. We’re going to assume that you have some familiarity with them—they’re both to-do apps, they’re largely desktop and mobile, and have similar features to help you organize your to-dos, add them on the go, be reminded of them, and hopefully, get things done—but if not, here are the basics:

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  • Wunderlist: Wunderlist is a cross-platform to-do list and project organizer, with apps for Windows and OS X, Android and iOS, Windows Phone, the web, and more. It’s clearly one of our favorites, and earned our pick as the best for Windows, for Mac, and for Android. It’s streamlined, simple and easy to use, features timed reminders so you don’t miss a task, notes and additional information for each item, and it keeps all of your to-dos and due dates on the web and synchronized across devices. If you prefer, just use the webapp to manage your to-dos.
  • Any.do: Any.do is a web-forward to-do list manager, with apps for Android and iOS, a Chrome app and extension, and a webapp. It’s our current favorite for the iPhone, and while at times it can be a bit spartan when it comes to features like customizable reminders and subtasks, its focus on simplicity and availability has made it a more than popular pick with tons of extra features under the hood. Like any good to-do manager, it syncs your to-dos and account across devices, is available on the web, and keeps track of your items so you don’t have to.

While some of our other favorite to-apps (like Google Keep and Todoist, for example) have picked up regular updates and improvements, these two have been a bit more quiet. In Wunderlist’s case, we assume the veil of silence descended once the company was aqcuired by Microsoft. For Any.Do, it’s not entirely clear. Let’s see where they are today.

How Wunderlist and Any.do Have Changed Lately

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

The fact that Any.do and Wunderlist haven’t made any splashy announcements or updates doesn’t mean they haven’t been making smaller, more incrimental improvements.

For example, a few months ago, Wunderlist updated its Android app to include quick-adding tasks, and integration with Google Now On Tap, and their iPhone and iPad apps got a similar update shortly after. Their Mac app got a similar update a few months earlier that made adding to-dos easier and added a few helpful shortcuts.

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Just last month, Wunderlist unveiled a new plug-in for Microsoft Outlook that works with Outlook on the web, or the desktop version of Outlook included with Microsoft Office 2013, 2016, or Office 365. For its part, the Outlook plugin makes it easier to share to-do lists with collaborators via email, turn email into actionable to-dos, and set reminders based on emails and requests in your inbox. It’s pretty useful, assuming you use Outlook for mail—and in a corporate setting that’s a lot of people. That’s the kind of move we expected to see when Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft. Similarly, Wunderlist recently added itself as a Zapier channel. If you’re not familiar with Zapier, think of it as a kind of IFTTT-like service that connects not just web services, but apps as well.

Over with Any.do, things have been a little more quiet. The app got a big uplift to Any.do 3.0 last year that improved to-do list collaboration, gave you the ability to zoom in and out of lists to check out sub-tasks or related items, and the option to sort all of your individual lists by time, priority, or list views. The new version picked up some design tweaks and improvements, and some usability improvements as well. Since then, the team unveiled a new iPad app that brought all of those same great features to the (slightly) larger screen.

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What Wunderlist and Any.do Offer Free and Premium Users

2016 To-Do App Showdown: Wunderlist vs. Any.do 

At the same time though, a lack of big updates don’t mean nothing is happening. Any.do’s Android app was last updated this week, and its iOS app was updated earlier this month. Wunderlist for Android picked up an very welcome update earlier this month that improved the user experience for Android Wear owners, and its iOS app picked up Apple Watch support not too long ago. All of its apps picked up a necessary update to fix issues with daylight saving time here in the US.

There’s still active development behind the scenes, and lots of attention to bugs, usability, and smooth operation for both apps. It’s a shame we haven’t seen huge feature updates, or big improvements to some of each apps’ biggest issues (recurring tasks are still a common complaint in the app store reviews for both apps, for example), but both services are still working hard to make sure each app has the best to-do management experience available.

Both apps are still freemium, with most of their popular features available without paying anything. You can download any of them on all of your devices, add your to-dos, sync them, and get reminders when they’re due. However, both apps have premium features, and here’s what you get for your money:

  • Wunderlist Pro ($5/mo or $50/yr) unlocks the ability to upload files of any size to attach to your to-dos, delegate tasks to an unlimited number of assignees (useful if you’re using Wunderlist on a team or with family), unlimited subtasks for your to-dos or projects, and additional cosmetic backgrounds to customize the apps. All in all, the pro version takes a few features limited (but still useful) in the free version and opens the door to them completely.
  • Any.do Premium ($3/mo or $27/yr) allows you to share unlimited to-dos with collaborators or assignees (free accounts are limited to one shared task), customizable recurring tasks (free accounts are limited to pre-set recurrances), location-based reminders, support for larger files attached to your to-dos, cosmetic themes for the app, and unlimited use of one of Any.do’s best features, Any.do Moment—a kind of primer for your day that walks you through your to-dos and encourages you to get them done or reschedule them. In Any.do’s case, many of the premium features aren’t available at all in the free version.

All in all, Wunderlist is still in a better place as far as giving you more features for no money, while Any.do offers a huge value for the money you do wind up spending on a premium account. So it may be clear that neither app is quite “dead,” but it’s definitely possible that they both may be slowing down a bit. Their developers are working on bugfixes and stability improvements more than new features, for better or worse. While that definitely makes us sit up and take notice, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

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The Verdict: The Best for You Depends on What (If Anything) You’re Willing to Spend

The battle between Wunderlist and Any.do isn’t one that’s settled easily just by bringing everyone up to speed on where these two popular apps are today.

If we had to judge purely on who’s been busiest adding new features and benefits, and who offers the most bang for no buck at all, we would have to go with Wunderlist. We can’t really see the need for someone to open their wallet for Wunderlist Pro, unless they’re using Wunderlist on a small team.

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However, for interesting and innovative features, premium or no, and for the most extra useful features for the money should you opt to pay for a premium account, we’d have to turn our eyes to Any.do. Any.do Moment is like a mini “weekly review” you can do every day, which is hugely useful, and they have more flexible recurring tasks—once you pay for them, that is. Any.do may be cheaper, but they definitely offer more features an individual may find useful to manage their own to-dos should you pay for an account upgrade.

http://lifehacker.com/5908816/the-we…

Wunderlist is under the Microsoft umbrella now, which bodes well for its continued existence, upgrades, and support—but it’s possible one day Microsoft will just absorb it and its team for another project. Any.do on the other hand is independent, but it’s been quiet. While users can certainly support it by paying for it and its sister app, Cal, being independent and quiet can be a sign that the doors may close any day now, or they’ll get acquired.

Should that all really matter to you when choosing the best? Not really, but it’s worth considering if you’re planning to spend money, you’re thinking about switching to-do apps, or you’re wondering where these popular picks stand today. With all that in mind, and since they’re both free to start with, try them both to see which one resonates with you the most.